Posts Tagged ‘urology’

On Beer Bellies, Heart Disease And Sexual Function

July 30, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD  7/30/16

fat

 

A bit of fat is good…but not too much

Having some fat on our bodies is not a bad thing, as long as it is not excessive. Fat serves a number of useful purposes: it cushions internal organs; it provides insulation to conserve heat; it is a means of storing energy and fat-soluble vitamins; it is part of the structure of the brain and cell membranes; and it is used in the manufacturing process of several hormones.

All fat is not created equal…It’s all about location, location, location.

Not all fat is the same. It is important to distinguish between visceral fat and subcutaneous fat. Visceral fat–also referred to as a “pot belly” or “beer belly”– is internal fat located deep within the abdominal cavity. Subcutaneous fat–also known as “love handles,” “spare tires,” “muffin top,” or “middle-age spread”–is superficial fat located between the skin and the abdominal wall. In addition to the physical distribution of the fat being different, so is the nature of the fat. Although neither type is particularly attractive, visceral fat is much more hazardous to one’s health than subcutaneous fat since it increases the risk of heart disease, diabetes and metabolic disturbances. Subcutaneous fat is inactive and relatively harmless and generally does not contribute to health problems.

Factoid: A beer belly is called a beer belly for good reason. One of the real culprits in cultivating visceral fat is drinking liquid carbs, whether they are sweetened beverages (sodas, iced tea, lemonade, sports drinks, etc.), fruit juices such as orange, grapefruit, grape, cranberry, etc., or alcoholic beverages. These liquid carbs have no fiber and are essentially pre-digested, stimulating an insulin surge and rapid storage as fat. It is always better to eat the fruit rather than drink the juice, since the fruit is loaded with fiber that fills you up and slows the absorption process and contains abundant phytonutrients. You would have to eat 3 oranges to get the same sugar and calorie load as drinking a glass of OJ, and it is hardly possible to do that.

Visceral fat essentially is a metabolically active endocrine “organ” that does way more than just create an unsightly protrusion from our abdomens. It produces numerous hormones and other chemical mediators that have many detrimental effects on all systems of our body. So, fat is not just fat. Visceral fat ought to have a specific name, as do other endocrine organs (thyroid gland, adrenal gland, thymus gland, etc.). This name should convey the dangerous nature of this “gland.” I suggest “die-roid” gland because of its dire metabolic consequences, including risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, low testosterone, erectile dysfunction (ED) and premature death.

When a patient walks into the office and the first thing I observe is a protuberant and bulging belly, a siren goes off screaming “metabolic syndrome, metabolic syndrome, metabolic syndrome.”

Factoid: Anybody with a big belly is pre-diabetic, if not diabetic already.

“Metabolic syndrome” is a cluster of risk factors that are dangerous to one’s health. These include visceral obesity as defined by waist circumference (men > 40 inches; women > 35 inches), elevated blood sugar (> 100 mg/dL), high blood pressure (> 130/85 mm), elevated triglycerides (>150 mg/dL) and low HDL cholesterol (the good cholesterol): (men < 40 mg/dL; women < 50 mg/dL).

Sexual dysfunction

Beer belly and metabolic syndrome are highly associated with low testosterone and poor erection and ejaculation function. The fatty tissue present in obese abdomens contains abundant amounts of the enzyme aromatase, which converts testosterone to estrogen—literally emasculating obese men. So, visceral fat can steal away our masculinity, male athletic form and body composition, mojo, strength, as well as the ability to obtain and maintain a good quality erection.

ED serves as a good proxy for cardiac and general health. The presence of ED is as much of a predictor of heart disease as is a strong family history, tobacco smoking, or elevated cholesterol. The British cardiologist Graham Jackson expanded the initials ED to mean: Endothelial Dysfunction (endothelial cells being the type of cells that line the insides of arteries); Early Detection (of heart disease); and Early Death (if missed).

Factoid: The penis can function as a “canary in the trousers.” Since the penile arteries are generally rather small (diameter of 1- 2 mm) and the coronary (heart) arteries larger (4 mm), it stands to reason that if vascular disease is affecting the tiny penile arteries and causing ED, it may affect the larger coronary arteries as well—if not now, then at some time in the future. In other words, the fatty plaque that compromises blood flow to the smaller vessels of the penis may also do so to the larger vessels of the heart and thus ED may be considered a genital “stress test.”

“Fatal retraction”

While the penis can genuinely shrink for a variety of reasons, most of the time it is a mere illusion—a sleight of penis. Obesity causes a generous pubic fat pad that will make the penis appear shorter. However, penile length is usually intact, with the penis merely hiding or buried behind the fat pad, the “turtle effect.” Lose the fat and presto…the penis reappears. Yet another reason to remain lean!

Trivia: It is estimated that for every 35 lbs. of weight gain, there is a one-inch loss in apparent penile length.

What does this all mean?

  • Visceral fat is a bad, metabolically-active form of fat that is highly correlated with metabolic syndrome, diabetes, heart disease and sexual dysfunction.
  • ED often occurs in the presence of “silent” heart disease (no symptoms) and serves as a marker for increased risk for heart disease (as well as stroke, peripheral artery disease and death) often occurring 3-5 years before heart disease manifests. Early detection of ED provides an opportunity to decrease the risk of heart disease and the other forms of blood vessel disease.  ED has a similar or greater predictive value for heart disease as do traditional factors including family history, prior heart attack, tobacco use and elevated cholesterol. The greater the severity of the ED, the greater the risk and extent of heart disease and blood vessel disease.
  • Intensive lifestyle intervention has the potential for reversing visceral obesity, metabolic syndrome and sexual dysfunction. This lifestyle intervention involves achieving a healthy weight, losing the belly fat, healthy eating, regular exercise, smoking cessation, moderation of alcohol intake, stress management, etc.
  • The good news about visceral fat is that it is so metabolically active that with the appropriate lifestyle measures it can readily melt away, as opposed to subcutaneous fat, which is tenacious and can be virtually impossible to lose.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo; paperback edition available at TheKegelFix.com

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc  

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

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Viagra, Levitra, Cialis or Stendra: Which ED Med Is Right For You?

July 1, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD  7/1/2016

IMG_1457(1)

Cartoon by my patient/artist Ben Blank given to me shortly after  Viagra became available in 1998.  It says it all!

There are lots of options available if you are having erection problems. In my humble opinion, healthy lifestyle measures should always be considered first-line: weight management, healthy eating, exercise (including cardio, strength, core and pelvic floor), sufficient sleep, avoidance of tobacco, excessive alcohol and excessive stress, etc. With respect to ED medications, there are now many choices. Today’s entry will discuss which of the ED meds is best for you.

How the Penis Erects

In an erotic situation, nerves to the penis release nitric oxide that then causes the release of cGMP, resulting in blood flooding into the erectile chambers of the penis, the basis of an erection. As the erection gets fuller, penile veins become compressed, limiting the exit of blood and ultimately the pelvic floor/perineal muscles engage to cause maximal erectile rigidity.

How the Penis Becomes Flaccid

After ejaculation, the enzyme PDE-5 (phosphodiesterase) is released, the chemical mediator of flaccidity. It results in decreased levels of cGMP, resulting in a loss of the erection and a return to flaccid status.

ED Meds

The ED medications include Viagra, Cialis, Levitra and Stendra. They work by inhibiting PDE-5 and are known as PDE-5 inhibitors. Effective for many men with ED, they result in enhanced erectile function, sexual satisfaction and quality of life.

They are taken orally, require some time to get absorbed and necessitate sexual stimulation to work effectively. Although they can result in some increase in penile fullness (tumescence) without sexual stimulation, sexual stimulation is a must in order to induce a fully rigid erection.

Although effective for many men, they will not work for everyone.  If there is significant nerve or vascular compromise to the penis, they will likely be ineffective. It is important to know that the same ED drug at the same dose may work variably depending on the particular time and situation, sometimes more effectively than at other times since there are so many factors that determine erectile rigidity.

Men who are taking nitrates of any kind should never use the ED meds or serious consequences may result, including a dramatic drop in blood pressure (Remember Jack Nicholson in “Something’s Gotta Give”?). All of these ED drugs are metabolized in the liver for breakdown by the body.

Viagra (Sildenefil) This was the first of the group, released in 1998. Dosed at 25, 50 or 100 mg, the half-life (the amount of time it takes for the blood level of the drug to drop by 50%) is about 4 hours. It is taken on demand and kicks in in 15-60 minutes and remains active for 4 or more hours.

Viagra trivia:  Viagra was discovered by chance. Pfizer scientists conducted a clinical trial with an experimental medicine that causes blood vessels to dilate in an effort to treat high blood pressure and chest pain. The medication did not work particularly well for the intended purposes, but had a side effect in that it dramatically improved erections. When the study ended, the participants were profoundly disturbed that the drug was no longer available. The rest is history.

More Viagra trivia: The name Viagra was born as a fusion of the words “vigor” (physical strength) and “Niagara” (the most powerful waterfall in North America).

Even more Viagra trivia: Viagra is not only used for ED. A 20 mg dose is effective for children with pulmonary hypertension, a condition in which the blood vessels in the lungs have abnormally high blood pressures.

The most common side effects of Viagra are headache, facial flushing, upset stomach, and nasal stuffiness. Less frequent side effects are temporary changes in color vision, sensitivity to light, and blurry vision.

Levitra (Vardenefil) This drug came to market in 2003 and is very similar to Viagra, available in 10 mg and 20 mg doses. The effectiveness and side effect profile is similar to Viagra; however, there are no reports of visual distortions as side effects. It is taken on demand and has an onset of about 25 minutes and has a half-life of about 4 hours and remains active for 4 or more hours.

Levitra trivia: The name Levitra derives from “elevate”; in French “le” indicates masculinity and “vitra” suggests vitality.

More Levitra trivia: Levitra is also formulated in a minty, dissolves-in-your-mouth 10mg formulation called Staxyn.

Cialis (Tadalafil) This was FDA approved in 2003 and is available in 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mg doses. The effectiveness and side effect profile is similar to Viagra. Uniquely, Cialis has a long duration of action that has earned it the nickname “the weekender” as it can be taken on Friday evening and remain effective for the remainder of the weekend without the need for an additional dose. This affords a considerable advantage in terms of spontaneity. Cialis is either taken on demand (usually 10 or 20 mg, although 5 mg can be effective as well) or on a daily basis (2.5 or 5 mg) and has an onset of 15-45 minutes and remains active for 36 or more hours.

Cialis trivia: Cialis is also approved to treat children with pulmonary hypertension.

In 2012, daily Cialis (2.5 and 5 mg) was FDA approved for the management of urinary symptoms due to benign prostate enlargement.

Cialis, on occasion, can cause backaches and other muscle aches. Cialis is not affected by eating fatty meals, which can slow the absorption of the alternative ED meds.

Stendra (Avanafril) This was FDA approved in 2012. Available in 50, 100 and 200 mg doses, it has the advantage of a rapid onset of action. It is taken on demand and has an onset of about 10 minutes and remains active for 6 or more hours. It seems to have lower rates of hypotension when nitrates are co-administered.

Stendra trivia:  The name Stendra probably is a derivative of the word “extends.”

My Take

I have been in urology practice since 1988 and have plenty of clinical experience managing ED with these meds. In my opinion, Viagra 100 mg is the most potent of the group, but will also incur the most side effects, particularly facial flushing and potentially a nasty headache. Levitra is very similar in most respects to Viagra. Cialis is overall the best of the bunch because of its long duration, the spontaneity factor, the ability to take it with a fatty meal and its dual utility of helping urination as well as sexual function. The downside to Cialis is the occasional muscle aches. Stendra’s rapid onset gives it a small advantage.

Many men are capable of functioning satisfactorily without any of these medications, but find that taking a “recreational dose” of Cialis 5 mg enhances erectile capability and takes 20 years or more off the functional age of the penis. It is particularly useful for those with performance anxiety.

$$$$$

These drugs have gradually increased in price to the point where they are ridiculously expensive, unaffordable for many. None of the ED meds are yet generic. They typically retail for $40 or more per pill.

Tip of the Day: Viagra 20 mg (for pulmonary hypertension in children) is now generic and significantly less expensive than the branded variety and can be used for ED (taking up to 5 pills) at significant savings.

Bottom Line: The arrival of this class of medication in 1998 revolutionized the management of erectile dysfunction. Each of the available ED medications in this class is effective in improving erectile dysfunction issues for most men. There are subtle differences among the four that provide potential advantages and disadvantages. Trial and error will determine what works best for your needs.

Wishing you the best of health and a wonderful Independence Day weekend,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo; paperback edition available at TheKegelFix.com

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc 

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

Viagra, Levitra, Cialis, Stendra: Which One Is Right For You?

July 1, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD   7/1/16

IMG_1457(1)

                     Cartoon by my patient/artist Ben Blank given to me shortly after  Viagra became available in 1998.  It says it all!

There are lots of options available if you are having erection problems. In my humble opinion, healthy lifestyle measures should always be considered first-line: weight management, healthy eating, exercise (including cardio, strength, core and pelvic floor), sufficient sleep, avoidance of tobacco, excessive alcohol and excessive stress, etc. With respect to ED medications, there are now many choices. Today’s entry will discuss which of the ED meds is best for you.

How the Penis Erects

In an erotic situation, nerves to the penis release nitric oxide that then causes the release of cGMP, resulting in blood flooding into the erectile chambers of the penis, the basis of an erection. As the erection gets fuller, penile veins become compressed, limiting the exit of blood and ultimately the pelvic floor/perineal muscles engage to cause maximal erectile rigidity.

How the Penis Becomes Flaccid

After ejaculation, the enzyme PDE-5 (phosphodiesterase) is released, the chemical mediator of flaccidity. It results in decreased levels of cGMP, resulting in a loss of the erection and a return to flaccid status.

ED Meds

The ED medications include Viagra, Cialis, Levitra and Stendra. They work by inhibiting PDE-5 and are known as PDE-5 inhibitors. Effective for many men with ED, they result in enhanced erectile function, sexual satisfaction and quality of life.

They are taken orally, require some time to get absorbed and necessitate sexual stimulation to work effectively. Although they can result in some increase in penile fullness (tumescence) without sexual stimulation, sexual stimulation is a must in order to induce a fully rigid erection.

Although effective for many men, they will not work for everyone.  If there is significant nerve or vascular compromise to the penis, they will likely be ineffective. It is important to know that the same ED drug at the same dose may work variably depending on the particular time and situation, sometimes more effectively than at other times since there are so many factors that determine erectile rigidity.

Men who are taking nitrates of any kind should never use the ED meds or serious consequences may result, including a dramatic drop in blood pressure (Remember Jack Nicholson in “Something’s Gotta Give”?). All of these ED drugs are metabolized in the liver for breakdown by the body.

Viagra (Sildenefil) This was the first of the group, released in 1998. Dosed at 25, 50 or 100 mg, the half-life (the amount of time it takes for the blood level of the drug to drop by 50%) is about 4 hours. It is taken on demand and kicks in in 15-60 minutes and remains active for 4 or more hours.

Viagra trivia:  Viagra was discovered by chance. Pfizer scientists conducted a clinical trial with an experimental medicine that causes blood vessels to dilate in an effort to treat high blood pressure and chest pain. The medication did not work particularly well for the intended purposes, but had a side effect in that it dramatically improved erections. When the study ended, the participants were profoundly disturbed that the drug was no longer available. The rest is history.

More Viagra trivia: The name Viagra was born as a fusion of the words “vigor” (physical strength) and “Niagara” (the most powerful waterfall in North America).

Even more Viagra trivia: Viagra is not only used for ED. A 20 mg dose is effective for children with pulmonary hypertension, a condition in which the blood vessels in the lungs have abnormally high blood pressures.

The most common side effects of Viagra are headache, facial flushing, upset stomach, and nasal stuffiness. Less frequent side effects are temporary changes in color vision, sensitivity to light, and blurry vision.

Levitra (Vardenefil) This drug came to market in 2003 and is very similar to Viagra, available in 10 mg and 20 mg doses. The effectiveness and side effect profile is similar to Viagra; however, there are no reports of visual distortions as side effects. It is taken on demand and has an onset of about 25 minutes and has a half-life of about 4 hours and remains active for 4 or more hours.

Levitra trivia: The name Levitra derives from “elevate”; in French “le” indicates masculinity and “vitra” suggests vitality.

More Levitra trivia: Levitra is also formulated in a minty, dissolves-in-your-mouth 10mg formulation called Staxyn.

Cialis (Tadalafil) This was FDA approved in 2003 and is available in 2.5, 5, 10, and 20 mg doses. The effectiveness and side effect profile is similar to Viagra. Uniquely, Cialis has a long duration of action that has earned it the nickname “the weekender” as it can be taken on Friday evening and remain effective for the remainder of the weekend without the need for an additional dose. This affords a considerable advantage in terms of spontaneity. Cialis is either taken on demand (usually 10 or 20 mg, although 5 mg can be effective as well) or on a daily basis (2.5 or 5 mg) and has an onset of 15-45 minutes and remains active for 36 or more hours.

Cialis trivia: Cialis is also approved to treat children with pulmonary hypertension.

In 2012, daily Cialis (2.5 and 5 mg) was FDA approved for the management of urinary symptoms due to benign prostate enlargement.

Cialis, on occasion, can cause backaches and other muscle aches. Cialis is not affected by eating fatty meals, which can slow the absorption of the alternative ED meds.

Stendra (Avanafril) This was FDA approved in 2012. Available in 50, 100 and 200 mg doses, it has the advantage of a rapid onset of action. It is taken on demand and has an onset of about 10 minutes and remains active for 6 or more hours. It seems to have lower rates of hypotension when nitrates are co-administered.

Stendra trivia:  The name Stendra probably is a derivative of the word “extends.”

My Take

I have been in urology practice since 1988 and have plenty of clinical experience managing ED with these meds. In my opinion, Viagra 100 mg is the most potent of the group, but will also incur the most side effects, particularly facial flushing and potentially a nasty headache. Levitra is very similar in most respects to Viagra. Cialis is overall the best of the bunch because of its long duration, the spontaneity factor, the ability to take it with a fatty meal and its dual utility of helping urination as well as sexual function. The downside to Cialis is the occasional muscle aches. Stendra’s rapid onset gives it a small advantage.

Many men are capable of functioning satisfactorily without any of these medications, but find that taking a “recreational dose” of Cialis 5 mg enhances erectile capability and takes 20 years or more off the functional age of the penis. It is particularly useful for those with performance anxiety.

$$$$$

These drugs have gradually increased in price to the point where they are ridiculously expensive, unaffordable for many. None of the ED meds are yet generic. They typically retail for $40 or more per pill.

Tip of the Day: Viagra 20 mg (for pulmonary hypertension in children) is now generic and significantly less expensive than the branded variety and can be used for ED (taking up to 5 pills) at significant savings.

Bottom Line: The arrival of this class of medication in 1998 revolutionized the management of erectile dysfunction. Each of the available ED medications in this class is effective in improving erectile dysfunction issues for most men. There are subtle differences among the four that provide potential advantages and disadvantages. Trial and error will determine what works best for your needs.

Wishing you the best of health and a wonderful Independence Day weekend,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo; paperback edition available at TheKegelFix.com

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc 

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

Ejaculation: His and Hers

March 12, 2016

Andrew Siegel, MD   3/12/2016

One of the advantages of the specialty of urology is that it encompasses patients of both genders, unlike gynecology, which strictly involves females. Since I am board certified in Urology as well as in Female Pelvic Medicine, my practice allows me to have an equal balance of male and female patients. This gives me the opportunity to appreciate comparative male and female pelvic anatomy and function, which in reality are remarkably similar–a fact that may surprise you.

 A Few Brief Words on the Embryology of the Genitals.

Who Knew? Female and male external genitals are remarkably similar. In fact, in the first few weeks of existence as an embryo, the external genitals are identical.

The female external genitals are the “default” model, which will remain female in the absence of the male hormone testosterone. In this circumstance, the genital tubercle (a midline swelling) becomes the clitoris; the urogenital folds (two vertically-oriented folds of tissue below the genital tubercle) become the labia minora (inner lips); and the labio-scrotal swellings (two vertically-oriented bulges outside the urogenital folds) fuse to become the labia majora (outer lips).

Gray1119

(Comparison of genital anatomy,  1918 Gray’s Anatomy, Dr. Henry Gray, public domain)

In the presence of testosterone, the genital tubercle morphs into the penis; the urogenital folds fuse and become the urethra and part of the shaft of the penis; and the labio-scrotal swellings fuse to become the scrotal sac.  So, the clitoris and the penis are essentially the same structure, as are the outer labia and the scrotum.                                                                                              

Ejaculation

Ejaculation is the expulsion of fluids at the time of sexual climax. The word “ejaculation” derives from ex, meaning out and jaculari, meaning to throw, shoot, hurl, cast. We are all familiar with male ejaculation, an event that is obvious and well understood and well studied. However, female ejaculation is a mysterious phenomenon and a curiosity to many and remains poorly understood and studied.

Male Ejaculation

Men often “dribble” before they “shoot.” The bulbo-urethral glands, a.k.a. Cowper’s glands, are paired, pea-sized structures whose ducts drain into the urethra (urinary channel). During sexual arousal, these glands produce a sticky, clear fluid that provides lubrication to the urethra. (These glands are the male versions of Bartholin’s glands in the female, discussed below).

Once a threshold of sexual stimulation is surpassed, men reach the “point of no return,” in which ejaculation becomes inevitable. Secretions from the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, epididymis, and vas deferens are deposited into the urethra within the prostate gland. Shortly thereafter, the bladder neck pinches closed while the prostate and seminal vesicles contract and the pelvic floor muscles (the bulbocavernosus and ischiocavernosus) spasm rhythmically, sending wave-like contractions rippling down the urethra to forcibly propel the semen out in a pulsatile and explosive eruption. Ejaculation is the physical act of expulsion of the semen, whereas orgasm is the intense emotional excitement and climax, the blissful emotions that accompany ejaculation.

Male_anatomy

(Male Internal Sexual Anatomy, permission CC BY-SA 3.0, created 18 April 2009)

What’s in the Ejaculate?

Less than 5% of the volume is sperm and the other 95+% is a cocktail of genital secretions that provides nourishment, support and chemical safekeeping for sperm. About 70% of the volume comes from the seminal vesicles, which secrete a thick, viscous fluid and 25% from the prostate gland, which produces a milky-white fluid. A negligible amount is from the bulbo-urethral glands, which release a clear viscous fluid that has a lubrication function. The average ejaculate volume is 2-5 milliliters (one teaspoon is the equivalent of 5 milliliters).

Who Knew?  While a huge ejaculatory load sounds desirable, in reality it is correlated with having fertility issues. The sperm can literally “drown” in the excess seminal fluid.

Female Ejaculation

This is a much less familiar subject than male ejaculation and a curiosity to many. Only a small percentage of women are capable of expelling fluid at the time of sexual climax.

The nature of this fluid is controversial, thought by some to be excessive vaginal lubrication and others to be glandular secretions. Although the volume of ejaculated fluid is typically small, there are certain women who ejaculate very large volumes of fluid at climax. Expulsion of fluid at climax may come from four possible sources: vaginal secretions; Bartholin’s glands; Skene’s glands; and the urinary bladder.

Skenes_gland

(Skene’s and Bartholin’s Glands, created 22 January 2007, original uploader Nicholasolan  en.wikipedia, Permission: CC-BY-SA-2.5, 2.0, 1.0; GFDL-WITH-DISCLAIMERS; CC-BY-S)

During female arousal and sexual stimulation, the vaginal walls lubricate with a “sweating-like” reaction as a result of the increased blood flow to the genitals and pelvic blood congestion, creating a slippery and glistening film. The amount of this lubrication is highly variable. Some women with female ejaculation can release some of this fluid at the time of climax by virtue of powerful contractions of the vaginal and pelvic floor muscles.

Bartholin’s glands are paired, pea-size glands that drain just below and to each side of the vaginal opening. They are the female versions of the male bulbo-urethral glands and during sexual arousal they secrete small drops of fluid, resulting in moistening of the opening of the vagina.

Skene’s glands (para-urethral glands) are paired glands that drain just above and to each side of the urethral opening. They are the female homologue of the male prostate gland and secrete fluid with arousal.

Scientific studies have shown that those women who are capable of ejaculating very large volumes are actually having urinary incontinence due to an involuntary contraction of the urinary bladder that accompanies orgasm. This is often referred to as “squirting.”

Bottom Line: In the animal kingdom (including human beings), sex is a clever “bait and switch” scheme. In the seeming pursuit of a feel-good activity, in reality—determined by nature’s evolutionary sleight of hand—participants are hoodwinked into reproducing. The ultimate goal of the reproductive process is the fusion of genetic material from two individuals to perpetuate the species.

The penis functions as a “pistol” to place DNA deeply into the female’s reproductive tract with ejaculation a necessity for the process. Similarly, the female genitals need to be sufficiently lubricated to optimize this process and the combination of vaginal lubrication from enhanced blood flow contributed to by Skene’s and Bartholin’s secretions will optimize nature’s ultimate goal.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx, comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store that is home to quality urology products for men and women.  Use code UROLOGY10 at check out for 10% discount. 

 

 

 

 

Robotics In Urology

January 23, 2016

Andrew Siegel, MD 1/23/16

The word “robot” was coined by a Czech playwright almost a century ago, derived from “robota,” meaning “forced labor.”  Now used routinely, robotics represents a significant engineering advance that has been rapidly adopted by urologists since its inception 15 years ago.  Before the availability of this technological breakthrough, major urological surgical procedures were performed through large incisions with poorer visualization, more blood loss, less precision, more pain and longer hospital stays and recovery.

With the advent of laparoscopy (“keyhole”) surgery done via small portals and thereafter the development and refinement of surgical robotics, many advantages have accrued. Major surgical procedures can be performed less invasively, with a reduction in blood loss, a brighter, sharper and magnified visual field for the surgeon, less pain and faster recovery. The robot has been put to use for prostate, bladder, kidney and adrenal surgery as well as for severe cases of female pelvic organ prolapse. Robotic technology has been beneficial in helping urologists remove diseased organs as well as in facilitating reconstructive urological procedures. Robots do not perform the surgery independent of the surgeon!  The urologist with a dedicated team of assistants harnesses the powers of the robot for the benefit of the patient, the robotic technology an extraordinary example of human-machine symbiosis.

Initially, portals are placed by small incisions that leave only small scars and cause limited pain. Through one of these portals, a camera is inserted to obtain an optically magnified, three dimensional, high definition view of the surgical field. The camera can be manipulated, zoomed, rotated, etc. Robotic instruments that are mounted on the robot’s arms are inserted through the portals. These include electric cautery used to cut and coagulate tissue, scissors, forceps, scalpels, needle holders and other surgical tools.

IMG_1614

(The operative field with robotic instruments mounted on robotic arms)

The surgeon sits at a console remote from the patient and controls and maneuvers the miniaturized robotic instruments while viewing the operation in real time. An advantage of sitting at the console is that it is a very comfortable, ergonomically favorable position that minimizes the postural fatigue that often accompanies standing up for traditional open surgery. The surgeon’s fingers are inserted into surgical joysticks that provide control of the instruments by using natural hand and wrist movements, with the system capable of “motion scaling,”  converting the surgeon’s movements to precise, tremor-free robotic micro-movements.  In addition to hand controls the surgeon uses foot pedals to control the camera, focus, electro-cautery and coagulation.  Seven degrees of freedom (each direction a joint can move is a degree of freedom) are provided at the instrument tips. 540 degrees of pivoting provide greater maneuverability than is possible with the human hands or laparoscopic instruments.

IMG_1613

(Dr. Mutahar Ahmed seated at the console performing a robotic prostatectomy)

Robot-assisted laparoscopic prostatectomy is the surgical approach of choice for removing a cancerous prostate gland, allowing the surgeon the benefits of markedly better vision and maneuverability, very refined precision in the dissection of delicate tissue and facilitation of suturing. Because of these advantages, in addition to less bleeding, less post-operative pain and shorter hospital stays, there are improved outcomes in terms of urinary incontinence and erectile dysfunction as compared with the open approach.

Bottom Line: Surgical robotics is a revolutionary technological advance that has been rapidly adopted by urology, general surgery, gynecology, cardio-thoracic, pediatric and ear-nose-throat surgeons. It affords numerous advantages including surgeon comfort and ergonomics, high quality 3D vision, motion scaling, enhancement of surgeon dexterity and elimination of tremors, which translates to numerous benefits and advantages to the patient.

Exactly one year ago,  New Jersey Center for Prostate Cancer & Urology (NJCPCU) and Bergen Urological Associates (BUA) merged practices.  The main office is located at 255 W. Spring Valley Avenue in Maywood, New Jersey. The combined group consists of  8 urologists, a physician’s assistant and nurse practitioner. The merger brings together the exceptional robotic skills of the NJCPCU urologists (having pioneered robotic prostatectomy in New Jersey and having performed more than 7000 such procedures) with the urological expertise and experience of the BUA urologists.

RoboticUrology.com                                                                                                BergenUrological.com

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

Erection Recovery Program

December 5, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD   12/5/15

Reviresco – (Latin, re- + viresco) “I become green or verdant again”; “I am renewed or revived.”

Outliving Your Penis

It is very possible that you will “outlive” your penis. It will always be there for you in terms of a “spigot” to allow you the privilege of standing up to aim your urinary stream with reasonable accuracy, although this too suffers the ravages of time. However, in terms of being able to obtain or maintain an erection, your penis may perish decades before you do, for a variety of reasons.

The focus of today’s blog is ED due to prostate cancer treatment, although it is equally relevant to any man suffering with ED for any reason.  Having one’s prostate removed is a highly successful means of curing prostate cancer.  However, despite advances in technical and surgical approach, trauma to nerves, blood vessels, and muscular tissue during surgery can compromise sexual function, with ED being the most common complication.  The effect of radical prostatectomy on the penis is not unlike the effect of a stroke on the brain: in both situations a neuro-vascular (nerve/blood vessel) event occurs that may profoundly disturb function.  90% of men experience some degree of ED in the early post-surgery recovery period. The good news is that there are effective “rehab” and even “prehab” methods to optimize preservation and return of sexual function.  

Even if your penis has “expired” in terms of becoming rigid, it is still capable of being stimulated to ejaculation and orgasm, a phenomenon eventually discovered by many men. This is a small consolation (pun intended) for suffering with ED.

If your penis is not completely lifeless, it may be impaired such that you can obtain an erection, but lose it prematurely, or you can obtain at best a partially firm, non-penetrable erection. As if having a crippled penis were not severe enough punishment, to add insult to injury one of the consequences of lack of erections and sexual inactivity is further compromise of the future potential for erections. In other words, you need to obtain erections in order to maintain erections.

Use It Or Lose It

Erections not only provide the capacity for penetrative sex, but also serve to keep the erectile chambers (erectile smooth muscles and vascular sinus tissues) richly oxygenated, elastic and functioning. If one goes too long without an erection, damage to this erectile apparatus can result in penile atrophy (shrinkage) and compromised function. In a vicious cycle, the poor blood flow from disuse induces scarring and further damage to erectile smooth muscle and sinus tissues that often gives rise to venous leakage (rapid loss of erections as blood cannot be properly trapped within the erectile chambers). The bottom line is that in the absence of regular erections, one will likely lose length, girth and function, with the penis hobbled by its inability to properly trap blood.

As an aside, one of the functions of sleep erections—the spontaneous nocturnal erections that occur during REM (rapid eye movement) sleep in healthy men—is to maintain the erectile chambers in good working order. As sleep has an important restorative function for the human body, so sleep erections have a vital restorative function for the human penis.

Penile Resurrection

Achieving erections when they fail to occur by natural means is vital for sexual “resurrection” (l like the sound of this word—say it slowly). In time, the nerves that were “stunned” and/or injured by radical prostatectomy will usually heal and during this convalescing time, obtaining erections will help preserve erectile tissue. The implication is that even if you are sexually inactive, if you anticipate being sexually active in the future, you need to keep the penis and erectile apparatus fit.

Many urologists recommend penile “rehabilitation” when healed up after radical prostatectomy. Traditional rehab involves a combo of pills, injections and vacuum therapy, a.k.a. vacuum suction device (VSD). Some men use one, two or all three of these rehab strategies.

The oral ED medications (Viagra, Levitra, Cialis, and Stendra) can help maintain penile blood flow and provide the benefits that derive from maintaining tissue oxygenation. However, they are double-edged swords as they cannot be used in the face of certain medical conditions, have side effects, are expensive (costing about $40 per pill) and are not effective in all comers.

For those who do not respond to pills, the next step is often penile injections. Vasodilator drugs are injected directly into the erectile chambers to induce an erection. A mixture of one or more medications is often used for this purpose. Unfortunately–despite its effectiveness–many men are not fond of putting a needle in their penis and often nix this means of treatment.

The VSD is the third traditional rehab element. Starting 6 weeks or so after surgery and pursued for 10 minutes daily, the VSD mechanically engorges the penis in an effort to keep the erectile chambers healthy.

The Erection Recovery Program

“Prehab” is a means of pre-rehabilitation that is started shortly after the diagnosis of prostate cancer, during the time period when one awaits being operated upon. Instead of waiting for after-the-fact rehab, prehab intends to maximize sexual function before surgery in an effort to hasten recovery of erectile function after surgery. Committing to the erection recovery program before the trauma of surgery permits one to go into the operation optimally prepared.

The Erection Recovery Program combines two non-pharmacological, non-invasive tools—vibratory nerve stimulation and pelvic floor muscle training—to stimulate the nerves that produce erections and to strengthen the muscles that contribute to erectile rigidity, respectively. The traditional rehab program can be highly effective; however, it addresses primarily blood flow, a vital element of erectile physiology, while not focusing on nerve stimulation and pelvic floor/perineal muscle function, important contributors to the erectile process.

Vibratory-tactile nerve stimulation in men was originally conceived (pun intended) for spinal cord injured patients who desired to father children but were incapable of doing so because of their inability to ejaculate. However, vibro-tactile nerve stimulation is equally effective in inducing erection as well as ejaculation/orgasm in the non-spinal cord injured population and its use has been expanded to the general male population.

The pelvic floor/perineal muscles activate at the time of sexual stimulation, compressing the deep roots of the penis and fostering hypertensive blood pressures in the erect penis in excess of 200 mm, responsible for rock-hard rigidity. Pelvic floor muscle training has been used to bolster the strength, power and endurance of these muscles in order to optimize erectile rigidity and durability. Without well functioning pelvic floor/perineal muscles, full rigidity will not occur.

Oral meds, injection and/or vacuum therapy help prevent erectile tissues from losing elasticity and becoming scarred and less functional from the absence of erections. Similarly, nerve stimulation and pelvic floor/perineal muscle training help maintain the integrity of the erectile tissues as well as help prevent the pelvic floor/perineal muscles from atrophying in the absence of erections.  By keeping the pelvic floor/perineal muscles fit, when erections ultimately do return, function can be optimized.

The combination of nerve stimulation and pelvic floor muscle strengthening is a powerful alliance that is prescribed “prehab” as well as after radical prostatectomy to shorten the time it takes to recover erections. Its merits are its simplicity, safety, efficiency and the fact that it is actually pleasurable to pursue. It does not preclude the use of the traditional rehab program, which can be used in conjunction with the Erection Recovery Program.

Specifically, the Erection Recovery Program consists of the Viberect nerve stimulation device and the Pelvic Rx pelvic floor muscle training program. Viberect, manufactured by Reflexonic, is an FDA-certified hand-held penile vibro-tactile nerve stimulation device that triggers erection and ultimately ejaculation. The Pelvic Rx program, manufactured by Adult Fitness Concepts, is a FDA-registered, comprehensive, interactive follow-along exercise program to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance. Basic Training strengthens the pelvic floor muscles with a series of progressive “Kegel” exercises, while Complete Training provides maximum opportunity for gains via resistance equipment.

Bottom Line: 

The critical principle for erectile recovery is achieving an erection for at least several times weekly during the recovery period after prostate surgeryPenile vibro-tactile nerve stimulation coupled with pelvic floor muscle training is a synergistic combination that promotes initiation and maintenance of erections, respectively. 

This Erection Recovery Program is used prehab (prior to radical prostatectomy) and continued after surgery.  It offers a non-pharmacological option for erection recovery, but can also be used in conjunction with traditional penile rehab programs that use medications.  The Erection Recovery Program is also appropriate for any man who wants to improve sexual function, regardless of the underlying cause.  

To obtain the Erection Recovery Program:

http://www.viberect.com/erection-recovery-program-combo-pack.html

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

5 Things Every Woman Should Know About Her Man’s Pelvic Health

November 28, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD   11/28/15

4910841630_d096720d0d_o (1)

(Attribution: Pier-Luc Bergeron, A happy couple and a happy photographer; no changes made, https://www.flickr.com/photos/burgtender/4910841630)

Since this is Thanksgiving weekend and a broadly celebrated family holiday, I cannot think of a better time to blog about how wives/girlfriends/partners can help empower their men’s pelvic health.

  1. His Erections
  2. Prostate Cancer
  3. Bleeding
  4. Testes Lumps/Bumps
  5. Urinary Woes

 

Erectile Dysfunction: A “Canary in the Trousers”

If his erections are absent or lacking in rigidity or sustainability, it may just be the “tip of the iceberg,” indicative of more serious underlying medical problems. The quality of his erections can be a barometer of his cardiovascular health. Since penile arteries are tiny (diameter of 1-2 millimeters) and heart arteries larger (4 millimeters), it stands to reason that if vascular disease is affecting the penile arteries, it may affect the coronary arteries as well—if not now, then perhaps soon in the future. Since fatty plaque deposits in arteries compromise blood flow to smaller blood vessels before they do so to larger arteries, erectile dysfunction may be considered a genital “stress test.”

Bottom Line: If your man is not functioning well in the bedroom, think strongly about getting him checked for cardiovascular disease. His limp penis just may be the clue to an underlying more pervasive and serious problem.

Prostate Cancer

One in seven American men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetimes and most have no symptoms whatsoever, the diagnosis made via a biopsy because of an elevated or accelerated PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) blood test and/or an abnormal rectal exam that reveals an asymmetry or lump. Similar to high blood pressure and glaucoma, prostate cancer causes no symptoms in its earliest phases and needs to be actively sought after.

With annual PSA testing, he can expect a small increase each year correlating with prostate growth. A PSA acceleration by more than a small increment is a “red flag.” The digital exam is simply the placement of a gloved, lubricated finger in the rectum to feel the size, contour and consistency of the prostate gland, seeking hardness, lumps or asymmetry that can be a clue to prostate cancer. It is not unlike the female  pelvic exam.

Bottom Line:  As breast cancer is actively screened for with physical examination and mammography, so prostate cancer should be screened for with PSA and digital rectal exam. In the event that prostate cancer is diagnosed, it is a treatable and curable cancer. Not all prostate cancers demand treatment as those with favorable features can be followed carefully, but for other men, treatment can be lifesaving.

Bleeding

Blood in the urine can be visible or only show up on dipstick or microscopic exam of the urine. Blood in the urine should also be thought of as a “red flag” that mandates an evaluation to rule out serious causes including cancers of the kidney and bladder. However, there are many causes of blood in the urine not indicative of a serious problem, including stones, urinary infections and prostate enlargement.

Blood in the semen is not uncommonly encountered in men and usually results from a benign inflammatory process that is usually self-limited, resolving within several weeks. It is rarely indicative of a serious underlying disorder, as frightening as it is to see blood in the ejaculate. Nonetheless, it should be checked out, particularly if it does not resolve.

Bottom Line: If blood is present when there should be none—including visible blood in the urine, blood stains on his undershorts or blood apparent under the microscope—it should not be ignored, but should be evaluated. If after having sex with your partner you notice a bloody vaginal discharge and you are not menstruating, consider that it might be his issue and make sure that he gets followed up.

Testes Lumps and Bumps

Most lumps and bumps of the testes are benign and not problematic. Although rare, testicular cancer is the most common solid malignancy in young men, with the greatest incidence being in the late 20s, striking men at the peak of life. The excellent news is that it is very treatable, especially so when picked up in its earliest stages, when it is commonly curable.

A testicular exam is a simple task that can be lifesaving. One of the great advantages of having his gonads located in such an accessible locale—conveniently “gift wrapped” in the scrotal satchel—is that it makes them so easy to examine. This is as opposed to your ovaries, which are internal and not amenable to ready inspection. This explains why early testes cancer diagnosis is a cinch as opposed to ovarian cancer, which most often presents at an advanced stage. In its earliest phases, testes cancer will cause a lump, irregularity, asymmetry, enlargement or heaviness of the testicle. It most often does not cause pain, so his absence of pain should not dissuade him from getting an abnormality looked into.

Your guy should be doing a careful exam of his testes every few weeks or so in the shower, with the warm and soapy conditions beneficial to an exam. If your man is a stoic kind of guy who is not likely to examine himself, consider taking matters into your own hands—literally: At a passionate moment, pursue a subtle, not-too-clinical exam under the guise of intimacy—it may just end up saving his life.

Bottom Line: Have the “cajones” to check his cajones. Because sperm production requires that his testes are kept cooler than core temperature, nature has conveniently designed mankind with his testicles dangling from his mid-section. There are no organs in the body—save your breasts—that are more external and easily accessible. If your man is not willing to do self-exams, at a moment of intimacy do a “stealth” exam under the guise of affection—it just might be lifesaving.

Urinary Woes

Most organs shrink with the aging process. However, his nose, ears, scrotum and prostate are the exceptions, enlarging as he ages. Unfortunately, the prostate is wrapped precariously around the urinary channel and as it enlarges it can constrict the flow of urine and can cause a host of symptoms. These include a weaker stream that hesitates to start, takes longer to empty, starts and stops and gives him the feeling that he has not emptied completely. He might notice that he urinates more often, gets up several times at night to empty his bladder and when he has to urinate it comes on with much greater urgency than it used to. He might be waking you up at night because of his frequent trips to the bathroom. Almost universal with aging is post-void dribbling, an annoying after-dribble.

Bottom Line: It is normal for him to experience some of these urinary symptoms as he ages. However, if he is getting up frequently at night, dribbling on the floor by the toilet, or has symptoms that annoy him and interfere with his quality of life, it is time to consider having him looked at by your friendly urologist to ensure that the symptoms are due to benign prostate enlargement and not other causes, to make sure that no harm has been done to the urinary tract and to offer treatment options.

Wishing you the best of health and a wonderful Thanksgiving weekend,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

The Curious Use of Genital and Anal Slang

October 24, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD   10/24/15

* Warning:  This blog contains adult language that you may find offensive. 

asshole_emoticon_by_marynightshade

(Asshole Emoticon, by marynightshade; no changes made Link: http://marynightshade.deviantart.com/art/Asshole-Emoticon-13248436  Licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution—Share Alike 3.0 License)

What an…“asshole”; “dick”; “dickhead”; “bell end” (British variety of dickhead)

He’s such a “jerk-off”; “wanker” (British variety of jerk-off)

She’s a “cunt,” “pussy,” “twat” (British variety of pussy)

The weather “sucks.”

This situation is so “fucked” up.

The aforementioned nouns and verbs are used metaphorically with negative and disparaging intent. What these phrases have in common is that they employ slang terms that refer to either the anatomy of the genitals and anal area, or alternatively, to some element of sexual function.

It is a curiosity that it is the slang terms that are used for derogatory purposes, but the non-slang, proper anatomical terms are never used in this context. Who ever refers to another person as an anus, penis, glans penis, vagina, etc.? Or, he’s such a masturbator? Or, the weather is like oral stimulation of a man’s penis? Or, this situation is like having sexual intercourse?

This genital and anal anatomical region of concern is valuable, often unappreciated human real estate. I am puzzled as to how our slang language evolved to use anatomy and physiology of the nether region in such a pejorative sense. Perhaps it is the fact that our culture has strong underlying puritanical roots. The word pudendum, meaning genitals, derives from the Latin “pudenda,” meaning “shameful parts.” Certainly the fact that these are the most “private” areas of our body and the most “private” of body functions—the only anatomical regions and activities that are considered off limits and politically incorrect to expose or pursue, respectively, in public venues such as beaches—may explain why they are fodder for ridicule.

I think we have it all “ass backwards” (pun intended). Pelvic function—sexual, urinary and bowel—is truly remarkable and never appreciated until dysfunction sets in.

For many men—and women for that matter—the vagina is a dark and mysterious place, but an amazing and versatile structure if you consider that it is a sexual organ that allows entry of the penis, an inflow pathway and receptacle for semen, an outflow pathway for menstruation and a birth canal for the fetus. Vagina magic!

The penis is an equally extraordinary multifunctional organ—no less so than a Swiss army knife—with an impressive ability to multi-task, having an array of functions including urinary, sexual and reproductive. In the words of Eric Gill: “The water tap that could turn into a pillar of fire.” It allows man to urinate with a directed stream and when erect, it enables vaginal penetration and sexual intercourse. Ejaculation deposits semen in the vagina, with the passage of genetic material and ultimately the perpetuation of the species. Penis magic!

Last but not least, the anus is nothing short of brilliant, the “asshole” not only capable of distinguishing gas, liquid and solid, but also is the structure standing between you and diapers. I care for patients with the devastating problem of fecal incontinence and recently evaluated a youthful 50-something year-old woman who recounted to me her circumstance of standing in an elevator with others present when fecal material started dripping out of her bikini bottoms, without her awareness.

So, if you wish to address a contemptible person, call them a “shit” or a “shithead”—so much more appropriate and meaningful slang than calling them an “asshole.” (Thank you Greg Lovallo, MD and Jennifer Bonilla, MA for pointing out the true utility of the S-word as opposed to the other genital and anal slang words.)

Bottom Line: Your “asshole” is your close friend and should never be taken for granted. Likewise, the entire genital/anal region should be admired, respected and held in the highest of esteem and not ridiculed, belittled and vilified. Think about that the next time you call someone an “asshole,” “dick,” or “pussy.” Just sayin’.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

A Lemon A Day Keeps The Urologist Away

July 25, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD  July 25, 2015

IMG_1354

The Northeast USA has recently experienced oppressively hot weather –sizzling, steaming, scorching, sultry hot. This extreme weather has the same significance to urologist as a frigid and icy winter to an orthopedist–a harbinger of busier office hours. Ice drives patients with fractures in to see their bone specialists, but heat drives patients with kidney stones in to see their urologists. Summer is the “high season” for kidney stones, often brought on by dehydration from the stifling heat. The hotter the temperature, the greater the prevalence of kidney stones. To help prevent this very common and extremely painful condition, it is important to stay well hydrated by drinking lots of fluids. A sign of good hydration is dilute-appearing urine, which looks more like lemonade as opposed to apple cider, or for the beer drinkers, light American beer versus a rich, dark European brew. Lemons, being citrus fruits, contain citrate in high concentration, a well-known inhibitor of kidney stones.

I’m puzzled why the word “lemon”—representing such a lovely fruit—is often used with negative connotations, referring to a poorly functioning car or a challenging situation that can be overcome, turning “lemon into lemonade.” I suppose it’s because of its natural tartness. But au contraire, the lemon is a citrus superstar that is appealing to all of the senses…to the eyes with its vibrant sunshine color and oval shape, to the nose with its distinctive citrus aroma and to the sense of touch with its firm, textured outer peel and juicy, segmented inner flesh and to the sense of taste, with its unique tart and acidic flavor.

Lemons are low calorie nutritional powerhouses.  In addition to citrate, lemons contain fiber, potassium, copper, calcium, flavonoids, B vitamins, folate and other phytochemicals. Lemons are packed with Vitamin C, a formidable anti-oxidant that helps slow oxidative damage that occurs via the accumulation of byproducts of metabolism and damage from environmental toxins. This accumulation is called reactive oxygen species (also known as free radicals) and contributes to diseases, aging and ultimately death.

Squeeze one-quarter or one-half of a fresh lemon into water or seltzer on the rocks for a refreshing, extremely low-calorie, delicious drink that is so much better for you than sweetened beverages such as sodas, fruit juices and sports drinks. This serves as a powerful tonic for preventing kidney stones. Urologists often prescribe medications containing citrate to help prevent stones, but why not try the natural, first-line approach at ramping up levels of citrate before trying the pharmaceutical approach?

In addition to being an awesome fruit that is great squeezed into a drink, lemon juice is wonderful on fish, in chicken dishes and in salad dressings. Lemons are often used as an ingredient for aromatherapy and in cleansing products as well. If you have ever visited Italy, particularly the Amalfi Coast region, you probably recall an abundance of citrus groves and a lemon-based liqueur called Limoncello available everywhere.

Bottom Line: If an apple a day keeps the doctor away, then a lemon a day keeps the urologist away! 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in your email in box go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

What You Don’t Know About Testosterone Treatment…and Perhaps A Better Option

January 10, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD  1/10/15

shutterstock_orange gu tract

The Magic Of T

You probably have heard a great deal about T (testosterone) and its extraordinary properties and indeed, for the symptomatic man who has low levels of T, boosting levels of this hormone can result in a remarkable improvement of energy, sexuality (sex drive, erections, ejaculation), masculinity, mood, body composition (muscle and bone mass), mental focus and other parameters. However, men considering T treatment need to understand that T is not a cure-all and must only be used under the circumstances of symptoms of low T and laboratory testing that shows low T. Most certainly, T has been over-marketed, over-prescribed and certain side effects have been understated. It is vital to understand the side effects of T before committing to treatment.

Some Necessary Science

Most T is made by the testicles. Its secretion is governed by the release of LH (luteinizing hormone) from the pituitary, the master gland within your brain. Some of T is converted to E (estradiol). E is the primary hormone involved in the regulation of the pituitary gland. Under the circumstance of adequate levels of T, E feeds back to the pituitary to turn off LH production. This feedback loop is similar to the way a thermostat regulates the temperature of a room in order to maintain a relatively constant temperature, shutting the heat off when a certain temperature is achieved, and turning it on when the temperature drops.

The Effects of Being on Long-Term Testosterone Replacement

So what happens when you have been on long-term T? This exogenous (external source) T, whether it is in the form of gels, patches, injections, pellets, etc., shuts off the pituitary LH by the feedback system described above so that the testes stop manufacturing natural T. Additionally, the testes production of sperm is stifled, problematic for men wishing to remain fertile. In other words, exogenous T is a contraceptive! Nearly all men will have some level of suppression of sperm production while on T replacement, less so with the gels vs. the injections or implantable pellets.

Thus, using T results in the testes shutting down production of natural T and sperm and after long-term T use, the testes can actually shrivel, becoming ghosts of their former functional selves. And if you stop the T after long-term use, natural function does not resume anytime quickly.  Although recovery of natural testosterone and sperm production after stopping T replacement usually occurs within 6 months or so, it may take several years and permanent detrimental effects are possible.  So, at the time that you are receiving the benefits of exogenous T, your natural T is shut off and you can end up infertile, with smaller testicles (testicular atrophy, in urology parlance)!

Is there an alternative for the symptomatic male with low T? Can you boost levels of T without shutting down your testes and developing shrunken, poorly functional gonads?

The answer is an affirmative YES, and one that Big Pharma does not want you to know. There has been such a medication around for quite some time. It has been FDA approved for infertility issues in both sexes and is available on a generic basis. In urology we have used it for many years for men with low sperm counts. But here is a little secret: this medication also raises T levels nicely, and does so by triggering the testes to secrete natural T. It works by stimulating the testes to make its own T rather than shutting them down. No marble-sized testes that have their function turned to the “off” mode, but respectable family jewels. The other good news is that treatment does not necessarily need to be indefinite. The testes can be “kicked” back into normal function, and at some point a trial off the medication is warranted.

The medication is clomiphene citrate, a.k.a, Clomid, and I will refer to it as CC. CC is an oral pill often used in females to stimulate ovulation and in males to stimulate sperm production. CC is a selective estrogen receptor modulator (SERM) and works by increasing the pituitary hormones that trigger the testes to produce sperm and testosterone. CC blocks E at the pituitary, so the pituitary sees less E and makes more LH and thus more T, whereas giving external T does the opposite, increasing E and thus the pituitary makes less LH and the testes stop making T.

Works Like A Charm

CCis usually effective in increasing T levels and maintaining sperm production, testes anatomy (size) and function. Its safety and effectiveness profile has been well established and minor side effects occur in proportion to dose and may include (in a small percentage of men): flushes, abdominal discomfort, nausea and vomiting, headache, and rarely visual symptoms. In general, those with the highest LH levels have the poorest response to CC, probably because they already have maximal stimulation of the testes by the LH.

Not FDA Approved For Low T

One issue is that CC is not FDA approved for low T, only for infertility. Many physicians are reluctant to use a medication that is not FDA approved for a specific purpose. It needs to be used “off label,” even though it is effective and less expensive than most of the other overpriced T products on the market.

Bottom Line: Treatment to boost T levels should only be done when one has genuine symptoms of low T and a low T level documented on lab testing. It is imperative to monitor those on such treatment on a regular basis. Using T to boost T can result in shutting down the testes and the possibility of atrophied, non-functional testes that do not produce sperm or natural testosterone. CC is an oral, less expensive alternative that stimulates natural T production.

A study from Journal of Urology (Testosterone Supplementation Versus Clomiphene Citrate: An Age Matched Comparison of Satisfaction and Efficiency. R. Ramasamy, JM Scovell, JR Kovac, LI Lipshultz in J Urol 2014;192:875-9) compared T injections, T gels, CC and no treatment. T increased from 247 to 504, 224 to 1104 and 230 to 412 ng/dL, respectively, for CC, T injections and gels. Men in all of the 3 treatment arms experienced similar satisfaction. The authors concluded that CC is equally effective as T gels with respect to T level and improvement in T deficiency-related clinical symptoms and because CC is much less expensive than T gels and does not harm testes size or sperm production, physicians should much more often consider CC, particularly in younger men with low T levels.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

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Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Co-creator of Private Gym pelvic floor muscle training program for menhttp://www.PrivateGym.com