Posts Tagged ‘perineometer’

Arnold Kegel’s Device—The Perineometer: Prototype Resistance Device

July 23, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD 7/23/16

perineometer

Image above: Arnold Kegel’s perineometer

 

The pelvic floor muscles and vagina often become traumatized with the process of pregnancy, labor and vaginal delivery.  Pelvic floor dysfunctions may result, including pelvic organ prolapse and vaginal laxity, stress urinary incontinence and sexual issues.

In the 1940s, Dr. Arnold Kegel created a special apparatus called a perineometer to help restore pelvic function and vaginal tone in women who had recently delivered babies.  The term is derived from perineum–the anatomical region between the vagina and anus (where many of the pelvic floor muscles are located) and  meter–to measure.  The device was placed in the vagina and provided resistance to contract the pelvic floor muscles upon and feedback as to pelvic floor muscle strength.

The perineometer is a pneumatic chamber about three inches in length and less than one inch in width. It is attached by tubing to a pressure measuring tool (similar to a blood pressure gadget) that is capable of measuring pressures ranging from 0-100 millimeters (mm). The patient inserted the device into her vagina and then contracted her pelvic muscles. The device provided resistance to clench down upon, similar to contracting one’s biceps against the resistance of the weight of a dumbbell as opposed to doing arm flexes with no weights. The perineometer allowed the user to observe the magnitude of each contraction of her pelvic muscles.

Who Knew? In terms of feedback, the perineometer device is not unlike the “ring the bell” strongman game at an amusement park where one swings a mallet as hard as they can in an effort to ring a bell mounted at the top.

The feedback element was of vital importance to the pelvic floor muscle training process, serving as a visual aid and confirming to the patient that the proper muscles were being contracted. It also served the purpose of showing day-to-day improvement, helping to encourage the participant to complete the program. Kegel recommended recording the maximal contraction at each exercise session, the written documentation providing further encouragement.

 Who Knew? Tracking one’s performance is fundamental to the success of pelvic training. By being able to observe forward progress over time, the process is enabled.

Kegel observed that when the vaginal muscles were well developed and had a contractile strength of 20 mm or more, sexual complaints were infrequent. However, when the vaginal muscles were inelastic, thin, poorly toned and had a weak contractile strength, sexual dissatisfaction was commonplace. Kegel observed that younger patients progressed more rapidly through pelvic training than older ones.

Who Knew? Patients vary greatly in their ability to contract their vaginal muscles. Some women are incapable of clenching down on an examining finger in the vagina, whereas others can squeeze so hard that the finger hurts!

Kegel recognized that pelvic muscle reconditioning proceeded in a sequence of stages. The initial phase was awareness and coordination. The next phase was transitional, the adaptive phase when the body learns how to properly execute the exercises; this was followed by regeneration, when the pelvic muscles respond to the exercises and increase their mass, strength, power and coordination. The final stage was restoration, in which there was a leveling out of the maximal pelvic muscle contractions.

Who Knew? Kegel observed that following restoration of pelvic floor muscle function in women with incontinence or pelvic laxity, many patients had increased sexual feelings—including more readily achieved and better quality orgasms.

Kegel’s PFMT regimen was rigorous, requiring a significant investment of time: 20 minutes three times daily for a total of 20-40 hours of progressive resistance exercise over a 20-60 day period. He emphasized the importance of not only pursuing pelvic training after pregnancy, but also prophylactically during pregnancy.

Bottom Line: In the 1940s, Dr. Arnold Kegel developed the prototype pelvic training device used to provide feedback to the user as well as create resistance to contract down upon. After many years of quiescence following Dr. Kegel’s seminal work, we have recently witnessed the availability of numerous resistance devices available in a rapidly changing, competitive and evolving market, all of which are based on Kegel’s perineometer. Most of the sophisticated training devices provide similar basic functionality—insertion into the vagina, connection to a smartphone app, and biofeedback and tracking—although each device has its own special features. An upcoming blog will review the current devices that are available. 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo; paperback edition available at TheKegelFix.com

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc  

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

 

 

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A Brief History of Kegel Exercises

April 16, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD  4/16/16

This first piece (of a two-part entry) reviews the history of pelvic floor training from antiquity up to 2015. The second piece (the 4/23/16 entry) is a discussion of the Kegel “renaissance” and “revolution” that is underway. This “sea change” in pelvic floor medicine that is currently evolving in the urology/gynecology medical community will most certainly permeate into the mainstream in the near future.

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His and hers pelvic floor muscles (Dr. Henry Gray, Gray’s Anatomy, 1918, public domain)

The pelvic floor muscles have long been recognized as instrumental for their roles in  pelvic organ support, healthy sexual functioning and for their contribution to urinary and bowel control. They also contribute to core stability and postural support. The pelvic muscles anatomically and functionally link the female pelvic organs—the vagina, uterus, bladder and rectum—and also affect the independent function of each. Pelvic muscle “dysfunction” (when the pelvic muscles are impaired and not functioning properly) in females can contribute to pelvic organ prolapse and vaginal looseness, urinary and bowel control problems, sexual issues and pelvic pain (tension myalgia). Pelvic floor dysfunction in males can play a role in the urinary incontinence that follows prostate cancer surgery, dribbling of urine after the completion of urination, erectile dysfunction, ejaculation issues and pelvic pain.

Pelvic floor muscle fitness is vital to healthy pelvic functioning and pelvic muscle training therefore plays an important role in the management of many pelvic conditions. Pelvic muscle training has the potential of not only treating pelvic floor dysfunction, but also delaying and preventing its onset.

Pelvic floor exercises date back over 6000 years ago to Chinese Taoism. The Yogis of ancient India practiced pelvic exercises, performing rhythmic contractions of the anal sphincter muscle (one of the pelvic floor muscles). Hippocrates and Galen described pelvic exercises in ancient Greece and Rome, respectively, where they were performed in the baths and gymnasiums and were thought to promote longevity as well as general health, sexual health and spiritual health.

However, for millennia thereafter, pelvic floor exercises fell into the “dark.” Fast-forward to the 1930s when Margaret Morris, a British physical therapist, described pelvic exercises as a means of preventing and treating urinary and bowel control issues. In the 1940s, the seminal work of Dr. Arnold Kegel resulted in pelvic floor exercises achieving the stature and acclaim that they deserved. Dr. Kegel wrote four classic articles that put the pelvic floor muscles and the concept of training them to achieve pelvic fitness “on the map.” Kegel’s legacy is the actual name that many use to refer to pelvic exercises—“Kegels” or “Kegel exercises.” Kegel determined that a successful program must include four elements: muscle education, feedback, resistance, and progressive intensity. He stressed the need for pelvic floor muscle training as opposed to casual exercises, emphasizing the importance of a diligently performed routine performed with the aid of an intra-vaginal device known as a perineometer to provide both resistance (something to squeeze against) and biofeedback (to ensure that the exercises were being done properly).

Despite Kegel’s pelvic regimen proving effective for many female pelvic issues, what is currently referred to as Kegel exercises bears little resemblance to what he so brilliantly described in his classic series of medical articles sixty-five years ago. His regimen incorporated a critical focus and intensity that are unfortunately not upheld in most of today’s programs.

In the post-Kegel era, we have experienced a regression to the Dark Ages with respect to pelvic training. Easy-to-follow pelvic exercise programs or well-designed means of enabling pelvic exercises to improve pelvic floor health have been sorely lacking in availability. The programs that are out there typically involve vague verbal instructions and a pamphlet suggesting a several month regimen of ten or so pelvic contractions squeezing against no resistance, to be done several times daily during “down” times. These static programs typically do not offer more challenging exercises over time. Such Kegel “knockoffs” and watered-down, adulterated versions—even those publicized by esteemed medical institutions—are lacking in guidance, feedback and rigor, demand little time and effort and often ignore the benefit of resistance, thus accounting for their ineffectiveness. With women often unable to identify their pelvic muscles or properly perform the training, outcomes are less than favorable and the frustration level and high abandonment rate with these regimens is hardly surprising.

Bottom Line: In the post-Kegel era, pelvic floor muscle training has been an often ignored, neglected, misunderstood, under-respected and under-exploited resource.

Coming next week: The Kegel Revolution

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– newly available on Amazon Kindle (paperback and Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo editions will be available in May 2016).

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health and Promiscuous Eating: Understanding Our Self-Destructive Relationship With Food   

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx.

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women.   Use code UROLOGY10 at checkout for 10% discount. 

30 Interesting Kegel Facts

November 8, 2014

Kegel Facts

Andrew Siegel MD (11/8/14)

shutterstock_femalebluepelvic

 

  • Arnold Kegel (1894-1981) was a gynecologist who taught at the University of Southern California School of Medicine. He was singularly responsible in the late 1940s for popularizing pelvic floor exercises in women in order to improve their sexual and urinary health, particularly after childbirth. His legacy is the pelvic floor exercises that bear his name, known as “Kegels.”
  • Arnold Kegel invented a resistance device called the perineometer that was placed in the vagina to measure the strength of pelvic floor muscle contractions.
  • Arnold Kegel did not invent pelvic floor exercises, but popularized them in women. Pelvic floor muscle exercises have actually been known for thousands of years, Hippocrates and Galen having described them in ancient Greece and Rome, respectively, where they were performed in the baths and gymnasiums.
  • Kegel exercises are often used in women for stress incontinence (leakage with exercise, sneezing, coughing, etc.) and pelvic relaxation (weakening of the support tissues of the vagina causing dropped bladder, dropped uterus, dropped rectum, etc.).
  • Arnold Kegel wrote four classic articles: The Non-surgical Treatment of Genital Relaxation; Progressive Resistance Exercise in the Functional Restoration of the Perineal Muscles; Sexual Functions of the Pubococcygeus Muscle; The Physiologic Treatment of Poor Tone and Function of the Genital Muscles and of Urinary Stress Incontinence.
  • Kegel wrote: “Muscles that have lost tone, texture and function can be restored to use by active exercise against progressive resistance since muscles increase in strength in direct proportion to the demands placed upon them.”
  • Kegel believed that at least thirty hours of exercise is necessary to obtain maximal development of the pelvic floor muscles.
  • Kegel believed that surgical procedures for female incontinence and pelvic relaxation are facilitated by pre-operative and post-operative pelvic floor muscle exercises.
  • Kegel believed that well-developed pelvic muscles in females are associated with few sexual complaints and that “sexual feeling in the vagina is closely related to muscle tone and can be improved through muscle education and resistive exercise.” Following restoration of pelvic floor muscle function in women with incontinence or pelvic relaxation, he noted many patients with “more sexual feeling.”
  • Kegel believed that impaired function of the genital muscles is rarely observed in tail-wagging animals, suggesting that with constant movement of the tail, the pelvic floor muscles are activated sufficiently to maintain tone or to restore function following injury.
  • The pelvic floor muscles form the floor of the all-important core group of muscles.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are involved in 3 “S” functions: support of the pelvic organs; sphincter control of the bladder and the bowel; and sexual
  • Men have virtually the same pelvic floor muscles as do women with one minor variation: in men the bulbocavernosus muscle is a single muscle vs. in women it has a left and right component as it splits around the vagina.
  • Men can derive similar benefits from Kegel exercises in terms of improving their sexual and urinary health as do women.
  • Kegel exercises can improve urinary control in men, ranging from stress urinary incontinence that follows prostate surgery, to overactive bladder, to post-void dribbling.
  • Kegel exercises can improve sexual function in men, enhancing erections and ejaculation.
  • If the pelvic floor muscles are weak and not contracting properly, incontinence and sexual dysfunction can result. If they are hyper-contractile, spastic and tense, they can cause tension myalgia of the pelvic floor muscles, a.k.a. a “headache in the pelvis,” which often negatively affects sexual, urinary and bowel function.
  • The pelvic floor muscles contract rhythmically at the time of climax in both sexes. These muscles are the motor of ejaculation, responsible for the forcible ejaculation of semen at sexual climax. Kegel exercises can optimize ejaculatory volume, force and intensity.
  • The pelvic floor muscles have an important role during erections, activating and engaging to help maintain penile rigidity and a skyward angling erection. They are responsible for the transformation from a tumescent (softly swollen) penis to a rigid (rock-hard) penis. They exert external pressure on the roots of the penis, elevating blood pressure within the penis so that it is well above systolic blood pressure, creating a “hypertensive” penis and bone-like rigidity.
  • The Kegel muscles are located in the perineum, the area between the vagina and anus in a woman and between the scrotum and anus in a man.
  • The Kegel muscles are not the thigh muscles (adductors), abdominal muscles (rectus), or buttock muscles (gluteals).
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you see the base of the penis retract inwards towards the pubic bone and the testicles rise up as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you can make your erect penis lift up as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you can interrupt your urinary stream as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • The 1909 Gray’s Anatomy referred to one of the male Kegel muscles as the erector penis and another as the ejaculator urine, emphasizing the important role these muscles play in erections, ejaculation, and the ability to push out urine.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are 70% slow-twitch fibers, meaning fatigue-resistant and capable of endurance to maintain constant muscle tone (e.g., sphincter function), and 30% fast-twitch fibers, capable of active contraction (e.g., for ejaculation).
  • Kegel exercises are safe and non-invasive and should be considered a first-line approach for a variety of pelvic issues, as fit muscles are critical to healthy pelvic functioning.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are hidden from view and are a far cry from the external glamour muscles of the body. However, they deserve serious respect because, although not muscles with “mirror appeal,” they are responsible for powerful and beneficial functions, particularly so when intensified by training. Although the PFM are not muscles of glamour, they are our muscles of “amour.”
  • The Kegel muscles—as with other muscles in the body—are subject to the forces of adaptation. Unused as intended, they can suffer from “disuse atrophy.” Used appropriately as designed by nature, they can remain in a healthy structural and functional state. When targeted exercise is applied to them, particularly against the forces of resistance, their structure and function, as that of any other skeletal muscle, can be enhanced. Kegel exercises are an important component of Pilates and yoga.
  • As Kegel popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises in females in the late 1940’s, so Siegel (rhymes with Kegel) popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises in males in 2014, with a review article in the Gold Journal of Urology entitled: Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Men: Practical Applications, a book entitled: Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health, and his work co-creating the Private Gym male pelvic floor exercise DVD and resistance program.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

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A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Private Gym: http://www.PrivateGym.com – now available on Amazon

Kegel and the Game “Telephone”

September 27, 2014

Andrew Siegel, M.D.

When I was in junior high school (yes, junior high…no such thing as middle school back in those dark ages!) we had parties and played silly games such as “spin the bottle” and “telephone.” In both games a group of us would sit in a circle, and with respect to the more sedate “telephone,” the first person would whisper a few sentences into the ear of the person sitting next to him or her. That person would repeat it to the next person, and so on around the circle. The last person would announce the message they heard. The message that the final person announced was virtually always very different and distorted from the original message, usually in a very funny way. My point is that the final “product” bore little, if any, relationship to the original, with each step in the communication process resulting in increasing adulteration.

And so it is with the exercise program that gynecologist Arnold Kegel popularized 65 years ago, with which the game “telephone” has seemingly been played. What is being bandied about now as Kegel exercises bears little to no resemblance of what Arnold Kegel described so brilliantly in his series of medical articles. As a consequence of this adulteration, current Kegels are often ineffective Kegels. Arnold Kegel died in 1981; if he were alive today to see the distortion and misinterpretation of his legacy, I am certain he would be unpleased.

I have carefully studied all of the medical journal articles that Arnold Kegel crafted in the late 1940s. In these scientific works, he explained his program of pelvic floor exercise that he used successfully on thousands of his female patients. I will happily provide PDF copies of Kegel’s articles to any reader interested in the classic, original, unadulterated works. I have distilled Kegel’s message to the following four principles:

  1. Muscle education with the development of the nerve pathway from brain to pelvic floor muscles.
  2. Feedback to confirm to the exerciser that the proper muscles are being used.
  3. Resistance that challenges the exerciser.
  4. Progressive intensity against resistance so that the exerciser can measure and monitor progress over time as pelvic floor muscle strength increases.

So, in accordance with the seminal work of Arnold Kegel, pelvic floor exercises should incorporate muscle education, biofeedback, resistance, and progressive intensity. Kegel recognized four phases of the process of pelvic floor muscle strengthening: “awareness, transitional, regeneration, and restoration.”

Now here is the problem—if you Google search “Kegel exercises” you will get over one million results, but virtually every exercise “program” that you read about—even those publicized by esteemed medical institutions—are knockoffs and meager dilutions of the rigorous resistive pelvic floor exercise regimen advocated by Arnold Kegel. These current programs require very little time, limited physical effort and most often lack in using the benefit of resistance.

Your search will often uncover a printable pamphlet suggesting a several month program of 10 contractions squeezing against no resistance to be done three times daily while stopped at a red light when driving your car or at other down times. What these current programs share in common is that guidance, training and direction are inadequate with programs lacking the feedback to confirm the engagement of the proper muscles. It is of no surprise that many who undertake these ineffective, bastardized pelvic floor muscle exercises ultimately abandon them as they fail to help the situation at hand. The recommendation of doing these exercises while multitasking is a recipe for certain failure. Properly executed pelvic floor exercises—like physical therapy—demands attention, focus and gravitas.

Exercise physiology has taught us that when it comes to muscle training, doing lots of sets with low resistance develops tone and definition, whereas doing fewer sets with maximum resistance builds strength and bulk. The same physiology can be applied to the hidden pelvic floor muscles. A successful exercise program mandates intensity to be successful as muscle adaptation will not occur unless the muscle is subjected to sufficient stresses and resistance.

Kegel devised the “perineometer,” a resistance device that enabled women to work out their pelvic floor muscles against the force of resistance. This device gave visual biofeedback regarding the engagement of the proper muscles and the actual strength of those muscles and allowed women to witness the gradual increase in the strength of their pelvic floor muscles. In terms of intensity, Kegel’s recommendation was “twenty minutes of exercise three times daily, with a total of at least 20-40 hours of progressive resistance exercises spread over 20-60 days, keeping records of maximum contractions each exercise period.” This is a far cry from any of the current programs that you will come across! Additionally, most exercise programs do not utilize a tool that parallels the essential role played by Kegel’s perineometer.

So many of the mainstream programs out there do not hold muster and are terribly ineffective. There is an enormous demand for effective pelvic floor muscle training programs, and the number of people who could potentially benefit from an effective program that adheres to the successful foundational principles laid down by Arnold Kegel is huge. So what to do?

And thus was born the concept of the Private Gym pelvic floor training program, developed through the collaborative efforts of an international team of experts including myself. The Private Gym’s Basic Training program strengthens the pelvic floor muscles with a series of progressive male Kegel exercises without resistance. The Resistance Program uses resistance equipment to maximize pelvic floor muscle strengthening. This program completely adheres to the foundational principles of Arnold Kegel, and then some. The Private Gym program incorporates muscle education, biofeedback, progressive intensity, and resistance. The new dimension added is progressive resistance, so that as pelvic floor muscle strength increases, the trainee can increase resistance accordingly. In other words, as your pelvic muscles get stronger, they can be challenged with increasing resistance. With Kegel’s perineometer, women worked out against the same resistance and over time were able to generate stronger contractions, but with the Private Gym resistance device, you not only develop strength by making progress against resistance, but ultimately increase the resistance in order to optimize the strength of the pelvic floor muscles.

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And don’t worry ladies, our Private Gym for women program is in the works.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

Andrew Siegel, M.D.

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Note: As Arnold Kegel popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises in females in the late 1940’s, so I am working towards the goal of popularizing pelvic floor muscle exercises in males. This year I published a review article in the Gold Journal of Urology entitled Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Men: Practical Applications to disseminate the importance and applications of these exercises to my urology colleagues. I wrote Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health, a book intended to educate the non-medical population. Finally and most importantly, I, along with my partner David Mandell and our superb pelvic floor team, co-created the Private Gym male pelvic floor exercise DVD and resistance program.

For more info on the book: www.MalePelvicFitness.com

For more info on the Private Gym: www.PrivateGym.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Exercise Your Penis…REALLY?

September 2, 2014

Andrew Siegel M.D.   Blog # 170

 

Your penis is an organ that wears many hats. It directs your urinary stream with sometimes laser-like precision (although this precision goes to pot as you age); when erect it allows for vaginal penetration; and at the time of climax, it permits passage of sperm to reproduce the species. Pretty remarkable in terms of its multi-functionality and handiness, similar to a Swiss Army knife, but really so much better! In terms of sexuality and fertility, the ability to achieve an erection is a must, and this is predicated on an adequate penile blood flow, which is the “rocket fuel” of penile erections.

Your ability to obtain penile rigidity is a matter of hydraulics—maximizing inflow of blood while minimizing outflow. I need to get a bit medical to explain this: Your penis contains 3 erection chambers that fill with blood. They are composed of sinuses, virtually identical to our nasal sinuses, and an erection occurs when the sinuses become congested with blood. Blood inflow is caused by smooth muscle relaxation in the penile arteries and in the sinuses. As the sinuses fill up, they compress the penile veins to block the outflow of blood. And hence you have a tumescent penis, plump, but not yet rigid.

So how do you go from plump to rigid? The pelvic floor muscles are the key players in the transformation from a tumescent penis to a rigid penis. They compress the deep, inner part of your penis, creating rigidity by aiding closure of veins and by elevating the blood pressure within your penis so that it is well above systolic blood pressure. An erect penis is a hypertensive penis (really a very good thing), and it is this tremendous pressure that causes bone-like rigidity. If this penile blood pressure at the time of a rigid erection were experienced in the arteries of your body, it would be considered a hypertensive crisis! So, the only organ in the body in which high blood pressure is not only healthy, but also desirable, is your penis.

With aging, the smooth muscle of all of our arteries tends to become stiffer and less able to relax, resulting in high blood pressure (a very bad thing) for many of us. The penis is not spared, as the smooth muscle of the penile arteries and sinuses stiffens and is less able to relax. Unfortunately, stiff smooth muscle in the penis does not lead to a stiff penis…in fact, quite the opposite. Additionally, our pelvic floor muscles weaken with age, like many of our skeletal muscles. Between the smooth muscle stiffening and the weakened pelvic floor muscles, we have the perfect storm for ED.

Where are your pelvic floor muscles? They are located between the scrotal sac and the anus, the saddle region where your body is in contact with a bicycle seat. In the 1940s, gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises (“Kegels”) in women to improve their sexual and urinary health. Men have similar pelvic floor muscles and an equivalent capacity for exercising them, with parallel benefits to sexual and urinary health. It’s high time that we demand equal pelvic rights!

Male pelvic floor muscle exercises date back to ancient times, having been described in ancient Greece and Rome by Hippocrates and Galen respectively. Performed in the baths and gymnasiums, these exercises were thought to promote general and sexual health, spirituality and longevity.

Most men are unfamiliar with pelvic floor muscles exercises, let alone with their pelvic floor muscles. Unfortunately, many physicians are not very knowledgeable regarding the pelvic floor and the benefits of fitness in this area, and do not see themselves as instructors of pelvic floor muscle training. Regrettably, our medical culture—heavy on prescription writing and surgery—does not typically promote lifestyle improvement and exercise programs such as pelvic floor training. I would like to explain to you why such exercises are well worth your time and effort.

There is exercise and then there is EXERCISE; for example, there is walking (moving is good) and then there is running with interval training (a great workout). When it comes to exercising your skeletal muscles, using resistance training—working against an opposing force—stresses your muscles to enhance strength, tone, power, durability and responsiveness. By gradually and progressively overloading the muscles working against the resistance, they will adapt by getting bigger and stronger. Imagine repetitively doing arm curls without weights as compared to doing curls with weights, in which case the added resistance will rapidly and effectively create muscle growth and accelerated strength.

Kegels 101 involves repetitions of pelvic floor contractions without resistance. How do you accelerate to Kegels 401—pelvic floor muscles with resistance? Dr. Kegel designed a resistance device for women called a “perineometer” that was inserted into the vagina to provide a means of squeezing against something and a way to measure the strength of the squeeze. Men don’t have a vagina, but they do have a rectum, and one way to do resistance training is to use a perineometer placed in the rectum. Not a very appetizing thought though, is it?

Remember that your pelvic floor muscles engage when you have an erection. When you contract these muscles, your penis magically lifts up towards the heavens with each contraction. Since the pelvic floor muscles govern this upward deflection, they can be challenged to lift up more than just the weight of your penis.

And thus was born the concept of the Private Gym resistance workout for men. Whereas the Private Gym’s Basic Training program strengthens the pelvic floor muscles with a series of progressive male Kegel exercises without resistance.

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The Resistance Program uses resistance equipment to maximize pelvic floor muscle strengthening. The equipment consists of an ergonomic weighted base and magnetic weights that attach to the base. It is placed on your erect penis, which is raised up and down by contracting the pelvic floor muscles in accordance with the follow-along DVD program, subjecting the pelvic floor muscles to resistance. Your muscles will gradually and progressively adapt to the load placed upon them and will strengthen in accordance with the resistance

 

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When one first hears about progressive resistance training for the penis, their reflex reaction is often: Are you kidding? Really? Seriously? REALLY? Weights for the penis? You must be joking! No way. When Dr. Arnold Kegel in the late 1940’s first proposed his concept of the perineometer that gets placed in the vagina in order to do progressive resistance exercises, he likely received many similar responses from both his patients as well as his medical colleagues. What, shove that up my vagina and squeeze? And this was the 1940’s, decades before the sexual revolution!

If one can discard their conservative prejudices and carefully consider the principle of resistance training for skeletal muscle adaptation, they will realize that resistance training for the pelvic muscles is no different than resistance training for any other skeletal muscle, a bona fide means of creating strength and endurance. Resistance training is a “boner-fide” (sorry—I couldn’t help myself) means of maximizing your pelvic floor muscle growth.

In terms of resistance training of the penis, the Private Gym clearly is superior and more user friendly and less invasive than using a rectal resistance device, with the limitation that it can only be used in those men who can obtain a sufficiently rigid erection, whether naturally, or with the help of pills such as Viagra, Levitra, Cialis and Stendra.

The Private Gym Company was established after recognizing that there was an unmet need for a means by which a pelvic floor muscle-conditioning program could be made accessible and available in the home setting. The premise behind the Private Gym is to help achieve pelvic floor fitness and optimize sexual and urinary health.

Adaptation of skeletal muscle is an accepted scientific precept and if you have ever had your arm or leg in a cast, you can understand the detrimental effect of disuse on muscle tone and strength. The corollary is that if you have ever done weight training, you understand the beneficial effect of resistance training on muscle tone and strength.

Elston Howard was a New York Yankee who invented the batting “donut,” a circular lead weight that slides onto baseball bats and is used by on-deck batters. This added weight during practice swings makes the bat feel very light once it comes time to step up to the plate and remove the weight. Howard employed the resistance principle to heighten power—use the weighted bat in practice and when it comes time to step up to the plate, you’re going to perform better. This principle will work on your “bat,” too—utilize resistance training in practice and when it comes time to “step up to the plate,” you’re going to perform better. The Private Gym resistance turns conditioning into a weapon that is capable of producing “outstanding” erections, maximizing stamina, and tremendously boosting one’s confidence.

Bottom Line: Resistance training is utilized for creating strength and endurance for every group of skeletal muscles in the body, and the pelvic floor muscles should be no exception. The pelvic floor muscles are skeletal muscles and, just like the biceps and pectorals, they will adapt in a positive way to the resistance (load) placed upon them.

 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

Andrew Siegel, M.D.

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Private Gym: http://www.PrivateGym.com