Posts Tagged ‘penile implants’

Practical Approach To Erectile Dysfunction

September 16, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  9/16/17

shutterstock_side view manjpeg

ED is a highly prevalent condition and a common reason for a urology consultation.  A pragmatic approach to its diagnosis and treatment–the topic of today’s entry–has always worked well for my patients.  A practical approach starts with simple and sensible measures, and only in the event that these are not successful, proceeding with more complex and involved strategies, dividing management options into four tiers of complexity. 

 Principles to managing male sexual issues are the following:

  • If it ‘ain’t broke,’ don’t fix it: “First do no harm.”
  • Educate to enable informed decisions: “The best prescription is knowledge.”
  • Try simple, conservative options before complex and aggressive ones: “Simple is good.”
  • Healthy lifestyle is vital: “Genes load the gun, but lifestyle pulls the trigger.”

Questions that need to be asked in order to evaluate ED include the following:

AS and DM

  • How long has your problem been present?
  • Was the onset sudden or gradual?
  • How is your sexual desire?
  • How is your erection quality on a scale of 0-5 (0 = flaccid; 5 = rigid)?
  • Can you achieve an erection capable of penetration?
  • Is your problem obtaining an erection, maintaining an erection, or both?
  • Is your problem situational? Consistent? Variable?
  • Are nocturnal, early morning and spontaneous erections present?
  • Do you have a bend or deformity to the erect penis?
  • How confident are you about your ability to complete the sexual act?
  • Are there ejaculation issues (rapid, delayed, painful, inability)?
  • Do you have symptoms of low testosterone?
  • What treatments have been tried?

Of equal relevance are medical, nutritional, exercise and surgical history, medications, and use of tobacco, alcohol and recreational drugs.  A tailored physical includes blood pressure, pulses and an exam of the penis, testes and prostate.  Basic lab tests including urinalysis, serum glucose, HbA1c, lipid profile and testosterone.

Information derived from the evaluation as described above will provide a working diagnosis and the ability to formulate a treatment approach.  Although a nuanced and individualized approach is always best, four lines of treatment for ED are defined—from simple to complex—in a similar way that four lines of treatment can be considered for arthritis.  For arthritis of the knee, for example, first-line therapy is weight loss to lessen the mechanical stress on the joint, in conjunction with physical therapy and muscle strengthening exercises. Second-line therapy is anti-inflammatory and other oral medications that can help alleviate the pain and inflammation. Third-line therapy is injections of steroids and other formulations.  Fourth-line therapy is surgery.

If the initial evaluation indicates a high likelihood that the ED is largely psychological/emotional in origin, referral to a qualified psychologist/counselor is often in order.  If the lab evaluation is indicative of low testosterone, additional hormone blood tests to determine the precise cause of the low testosterone are done prior to consideration for treatment aimed at getting the testosterone in normal range.  If the lab evaluation demonstrates unrecognized or poorly controlled diabetes or a risky lipid and cholesterol profile, appropriate medical referral is important.

Practical treatment of ED


elephant penis
 Credit for photo above goes to one of my patients; note the 7 prodigious appendages!

First-line: Lifestyle makeover

 A healthy lifestyle can “reverse” ED naturally, as opposed to “managing” it. ED can be considered a “chronic disease,” and as such, changes in diet and lifestyle can reverse it, prevent its progression and even prevent its onset.

My initial approach is to think “big picture” (and not just one particular aspect of the body working poorly).  Since sexual functioning is based upon many body components working harmoniously (central and peripheral nerve system, hormone system, blood vessel system, smooth and skeletal muscles), the first-line approach is to do what nurtures every cell, tissue and organ in the body. This translates to getting down to “fighting” weight, adopting a heart-healthy and penis-healthy diet (whole foods, nutrient-dense, calorie-light, avoiding processed and refined junk foods), exercising moderately, losing the tobacco habit, consuming alcohol in moderation, managing stress (yoga, meditation, massage, hot baths, whatever it takes, etc.), and getting adequate quantity and quality of sleep. Aside from general exercises (cardio, core, strength and flexibility training), specific pelvic floor muscle exercises (“man-Kegels”) are beneficial to improve the strength, power and endurance of the penile “rigidity” muscles.

If a healthy lifestyle can be adopted, sexual function will often improve dramatically, in parallel to overall health improvements. Many medications have side effects that negatively impact sexual function. A bonus of improved lifestyle is potentially allowing lower dosages or elimination of medications (blood pressure, cholesterol, diabetic meds, etc.), which can further improve sexual function.

“The food you eat is so profoundly instrumental to your health that breakfast, lunch and dinner are in fact exercises in medical decision making.”  Thomas Campbell MD

 

healthy meal

Above: A nice, healthy meal consisting of salmon, salad, veggies and quinoa

 

fat belly

Above: Not the kind of belly you want–visceral obesity is a virtual guarantee of pre-diabetes–if not diabetes–and greatly increases one’s risk of cardiovascular disease, including ED

Bottom line: Drop pounds, eat better, move more, stress less, sleep soundly = love better!

Second-line: ED pills and mechanical devices

In my opinion, the oral ED medications should be reserved for when lifestyle optimization fails to improve the sexual issues. This may be at odds with other physicians who find it convenient to simply prescribe meds, and with patients who want the quick and easy fix.  However, as good as Viagra, Levitra, Cialis and Stendra may be, they are expensive, have side effects, are not effective for every patient and cannot be used in everyone, as there are medical situations and medications that you might be on that preclude their use. In the second-line category, I also include the mechanical, non-pharmacological, non-surgical devices, including the Viberect and the vacuum suction devices.

Viagra (Sildenefil). Available in three doses—25, 50, and 100 mg—it is taken on demand and once swallowed, it will increase penile blood flow and produce an erection in most men within 30-60 minutes if they are sexually stimulated, and will remain active for up to 8 hours.

 Levitra (Vardenefil). Similar to Viagra, it is available in 5, 10, and 20 mg doses. Its effectiveness and side effect profile is similar to Viagra.

Cialis (Tadalafil).  Available in 2.5, 5 mg, 10mg, and 20 mg doses, its effectiveness and side effect profile is similar to Viagra. Its duration of action is approximately 36 hours, which has earned it the nickname of “the weekender.” Daily lower doses of Cialis are also FDA-approved for the management of urinary symptoms due to benign prostate enlargement.

Stendra (Avanafil). Similar to Viagra, it is available in 50, 100 and 200 mg doses. Its advantage is rapid onset.

Vacuum suction device                                                                                                                          This is a mechanical means of producing an erection in which the penis is placed within a plastic cylinder connected to a manual or battery-powered vacuum. The negative pressure engorges the penis with blood and a constriction band is temporarily placed around the base of the penis to maintain the erection.

Viberect device                                                                                                                               Initially employed as a means of triggering ejaculation in men with spinal cord injuries using vibrational energy, it has achieved wider use in provoking erections in men with ED. The device has dual arms that are placed in direct contact with the penile shaft. The vibratory stimulation will cause an erection and ultimately induce ejaculation.

Third-line: Vasodilating (increase blood flow) urethral suppositories and penile injections

These drugs are not pills, but other formulations (suppositories and injections) that increase penile blood flow and induce an erection.

M.U.S.E. (Medical urethral system for erection).  This is a vasodilator pellet—available in 125, 250, 500, and 1000 microgram dosages—that is placed into the urinary channel after urinating.  Absorption occurs through the urethra into the adjacent erectile chambers, inducing increased penile blood flow and potentially an erection.

Caverject and Edex (Prostaglandin E1) are vasodilators that when injected directly into the erectile chambers result in increased blood flow and erectile rigidity. After one is taught the technique of self-injection, the medication can be used on demand, resulting in rigid and durable erections.  A combination of medications can be used for optimal results– this combination is known as Trimix and consists of Papaverine, Phentolamine, and Alprostadil.

Fourth-line: Penile implants

There are two types of these devices that are surgically implanted into the erectile chambers under anesthesia, most often on an outpatient basis. Penile implants are totally internal, with no visible external parts, and aim to provide sufficient penile rigidity to permit vaginal penetration.

The semi-rigid device is a simple one-piece flexible unit consisting of paired rods that are implanted into the erectile chambers. The penis with implanted flexible rods is bent up for sexual intercourse and bent down for concealment. The inflatable device is a three-piece unit that is capable of inflation and deflation. Inflatable inner tubes are implanted within the erectile chambers, a fluid reservoir is implanted behind the pubic bone and a control pump in the scrotum, adjacent to the testes. When the patient desires an erection, he pumps the control pump several times, which transfers fluid from the reservoir to the inflatable inner tubes, creating a hydraulic erection which can be used for as long as desired. When the sexual act is completed, he deflates the mechanism via the control pump, transferring fluid back to the reservoir.

Penile implants can be a life changer for a man who cannot achieve a sustainable erection. They provide the necessary penile rigidity to have intercourse whenever and for however long that is desirable.

 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

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Putting Some “Lead” In Your Pencil: A Fix For The “Innie” Penis

April 29, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   4/28/2017

pencil pixbay

Thank you, Pixabay, for image above

As Multi-Functional as a Swiss Army Knife

The penis is an extraordinary organ with urinary, sexual and reproductive functions. The possession of a penis endows man with the ability to stand to urinate and direct his urinary stream, a distinct advantage over the clumsy apparatus of the fairer sex that generates a spraying, poor-directed stream that demands sitting down on a toilet seat. The advantage of being able to stand to urinate (and keep one’s body appropriately distanced from the horrors of many public toilets) is priceless. Although man does not often have to employ this, the capability (when necessary) of urinating outside is another benefit of our design.  Many find the outdoor voiding experience pleasing, observing the pleasant sounds and visuals of a forceful stream striking our target (often a tree) with finesse, creating rivulets and cascades to show for our efforts.

Getting beyond the urinary, the most dramatic penis magic is its ability to change its form in a matter of seconds, morphing into an erect “proud soldier” and enabling the wherewithal for vaginal penetration and with sufficient stimulation, for ejaculation.  All that fun, but really serving the purpose of the passage of genetic material and ultimately the perpetuation of our species…reproductive wizardry!

The water tap that could turn into a pillar of fire.”

Eric Gill

tap pixabay

pixabay pillar

Thank you, Pixabay, for images above

 

The Sometimes Cruel Process of Aging Does Not Spare the Penis

 “Getting older is an honor and a privilege, but getting old is a burden.”

Beverly Radow (my aunt, who will turn 90-years-old this year)

Long after our reproductive years are over and fatherhood is no longer a consideration, most men still wish to be able to achieve a decent-enough erection to have sexual intercourse.  As well, we still desire to be able to urinate standing upright with laser-like urinary stream precision.

However, the ravages of time (and poor lifestyle habits) can wreak havoc on penile anatomy and function.  Many middle-aged men typically gain a few pounds a year, ultimately developing a bit of a pubic fat pad–the male equivalent of the female mons pubis– and before you know it the penis appears shorter and becomes an “innie” as opposed to an “outie.”  In actuality, penile length is usually more-or-less preserved, with the penis merely hiding behind the fat pad, the “turtle effect.” Lose the fat and presto…the penis reappears. This is why having a plus-sized figure is not a good thing when it comes to size matters.

Useful Factoid: The Angry Inch…It is estimated that there is a one-inch loss in apparent penile length with every 35 lbs. of weight gain.

One of the problems with a shorter and more internal penis is that the forceful and precise urinary stream of yesteryear gives way to a spraying and dribbling-quality stream that can drip down one’s legs, spray over the floor and onto one’s feet (and even at times towards or on the gentleman next to you at the urinal!).

Almost Useless Factoid: Water Sports…Turkey vultures pee on themselves to deal with the heat of the summer on their dark feathers, since they lack sweat glands.  By excreting on their legs, the birds use urine evaporation to cool themselves down in the process of “urohidrosis.”  Unless you are a turkey vulture, peeing on yourself or others is rather undesirable!

The solution to having a recessed penis that is often hidden from sight and has lost its aiming capabilities is to sit on the toilet bowl to urinate, joining the leagues of our female companions who are “stream-challenged” because of their anatomy.

With aging (and poor lifestyle habits) also comes declining sexual function and activity as rigid erections going by the wayside.  However, like any other body part, the penis needs to be used on a regular basis—the way nature intended—in order to maintain its health. In the absence of regular sexual activity, disuse atrophy (wasting away with a decline in anatomy and function) of the penile erectile tissues can occur, resulting in a de-conditioned and smaller penis that does not function like it used to.

Factoid: Disuse Atrophy…If one goes too long without an erection, collagen, smooth muscle, elastin and other erectile tissues may become compromised, resulting in a loss of penile length and girth and limiting one’s ability to achieve an erection.  Conversely, sexual intercourse on a regular basis protects against ED issues and the risk of ED is inversely related to the frequency of intercourse.

The point I am trying to hammer home is that aging, weight gain and poor lifestyle habits often render men with penises that are:

  1. Shrunken and recessed
  2. Unreliable in terms of ability to pee straight, requiring sitting down on the toilet bowl like women
  3. Unreliable with respect to sexual function

Factoid: Point 1 + Point 2 + Point 3 = EMASCULATION (depriving man of his male role and identity)

What To Do?

The first step is to keep one’s body (and penis) as healthy as possible via intelligent lifestyle choices. These include the following: smart eating habits; maintaining a healthy weight; engaging in exercise (including pelvic floor muscle training); obtaining adequate sleep; consuming alcohol in moderation; avoiding tobacco; and stress reduction. The use of ED medications on a low-dose, daily basis can sometimes help all 3 issues.

In the event that the aforementioned means fail to correct the problem, a virtually sure-fire way of rectifying all three issues is by a simple surgical procedure.  Malleable penile implants (penile rods) are surgically placed into each erectile chamber of the penis (the two inner tubes of the penis that under normal circumstances fill with blood to create an erection). The implants act as skeletal framework for the penis (“bones” of the penis). Two USA companies, Coloplast and AMS (American Medical Systems) manufacture the rods that are in current use. They are very similar with subtle differences.

464x261_GenesisColoplast Genesis implant

AMS Spectra

American Medical Systems Spectra implant

The implant procedure of these two stiff-but-flexible rods into the erectile chambers of the penis is performed by a urologist on an outpatient basis.  Like shoes, the penile rods come in a variety of lengths and widths and fundamental to the success of the procedure is to properly measuring the dimensions of the erectile chambers in order to obtain an ideal fit. The small incision needed to implant the rods is closed with sutures that dissolve on their own. Healing typically takes about 6 weeks, after which sexual relations can be initiated.

An erection suitable for penetration and sexual intercourse is available 24-7-365, simply by bending the penis up. The penis is angled down for concealment purposes. It is flexible enough to be comfortably flexed up or down, while rigid enough for intercourse, the best of all worlds.

Print

Penile rods in action, bent down for concealment and up for urination and sex

Bottom Line:  It is not uncommon for aging, weight gain and unhealthy lifestyle factors to conspire to compromise penile anatomy and function with respect to apparent penile size, urinary stream precision and erectile rigidity.  This leaves one emasculated with a penis that is often concealed, shortened and habitually limp, impeding the ability to have sexual intercourse, as well as a spraying quality urinary stream necessitating sitting to urinate.  If lifestyle improvement measures do not correct the situation, literally and figuratively “putting some lead in your pencil” using a simple malleable penile implant can “kill three birds with one stone.” (I could not resist the very mixed metaphor.)  Confidence can be restored with the conversion of the “innie” penis to an “outie,” the ability to resume sexual intercourse and the reestablishment of a directed, non-spraying stream to permit standing to urinate.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health  http://www.TheKegelFix.com

Man Kegels (Pelvic Floor Muscle Exercises for Men)-Part 2

March 15, 2014

Andrew Siegel MD, Blog# 145

photo

The photo above was taken by a pharmaceutical rep friend who discovered this phallic carving among the Roman ruins in Fez, Morocco.

The following is largely excerpted from my forthcoming book, Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health, available in April 2014:

With respect to sexuality, medical publications—and more specifically the urological literature—rarely, if ever make mention of targeted exercise as a means of optimizing function or helping to treat a dysfunction. The preeminent urology textbook, Campbell’s Urology, a 4000 page, 4-volume tome, devotes precisely one paragraph to the use of pelvic floor muscle exercises in the management of male sexual dysfunction and makes no mention of its use in maximizing sexual function.

Despite numerous studies and research demonstrating the effectiveness of targeted pelvic exercises, they have been given short shrift. Part of the reason for this is simply that there has never been an easy-to-follow exercise program or well-designed means of facilitating pelvic floor muscle training in men. Instead, there is an emphasis on oral medications, urethral suppositories, penile injections, vacuum devices and penile implants. In the United States we have a pharmacology-centric medical culture—“a pill for every ill”—with aggressive prescription writing by physicians and a patient population that expects a quick fix.

It is shameful that traditionally there has been such little emphasis on lifestyle improvement—healthy diet, weight management, exercising, and avoidance of tobacco, excessive alcohol and stress—as a means of preventing and improving sexual dysfunction.

In addition to general lifestyle measures, specific exercises targeted at the pelvic floor can confer great benefits to pelvic health and fitness, an important element of overall health and fitness. The pelvic floor muscles (PFM) are critical to healthy  sexual function and achieving fitness in this domain is advantageous on many levels: to enhance sexual health; to maintain sexual health; to help prevent the occurrence of sexual dysfunction in the future; and to aid in the management of sexual dysfunction. PFM exercises should be considered first-line treatment of sexual dysfunction and a safe and natural self-improvement approach ideally suited to the male population, including the baby boomers, generation X, and generation Y.  PFM fitness can serve as an effective means to help keep the boomers “booming.”

I do not mean to downplay and disparage the role of medications and other options in managing sexual dysfunction. The availability of that magic blue pill in April 1998—Viagra—was a seminal moment in the world of male sexual dysfunction that enabled for the first time a simple and effective means of treating erectile dysfunction (ED).  On the polar opposite end of the treatment spectrum—but of no less importance—was the development and refinement of the penile implant, used in severe cases of ED unresponsive to less invasive options.

But why should we not initially try to capitalize on simpler, safer, and more natural solutions and consider, for example, using a targeted exercise program or medications in conjunction with a targeted exercise program?  Sexual function is all about blood flow to the penis and pelvis.  And what better way to enhance blood flow than to exercise?  We engage in exercise programs for virtually every other muscle group in the body.  Working out our PFM can result in a strong, robust and toned pelvic floor, capable of supporting and sustaining sexual function to the maximum.

Physical therapy is a well-accepted discipline that is commonly used for disabilities and rehabilitation after injury or surgery.  The goal of a physical therapy regimen is to promote mobility, functional restoration and quality of life. A targeted PFM exercise regimen can be considered the equivalent of genital and pelvic physical therapy with the goal of increasing the bulk, strength, power and function of the PFM.

The PFM can be thought of as a vital partner to our sexual organs, whose collaboration is an absolute necessity for optimal sexual functioning, little different than the relationship between the diaphragm muscle and the lungs. The role of the PFM in sexual function has been vastly undervalued and understated. The hard truth is that a well-conditioned pelvic floor that can be vigorously contracted and relaxed at will is often capable of improving sexual prowess and functioning as much as fitness training can enhance athletic performance and endurance.

Such targeted exercises confer advantages that go way beyond the sexual domain. These often-neglected muscles are vital to our genital-urinary health and wellness and serve an essential role in urinary function, bowel function and prostate health.  Additionally, they are important contributors to lumbar stability, spinal alignment and the prevention of back pain. Specifically, PFM exercises can be beneficial with respect to the following spectrum of issues: erectile dysfunction; orgasmic dysfunction; premature ejaculation; urinary incontinence; overactive bladder; post-void dribbling; pelvic pain due to levator muscle spasm; bowel urgency and incontinence; and in mitigating damage incurred from saddle sports including cycling, motorcycling and horseback riding.

The PFM, comprised of muscles that form a muscular shelf that spans the gap between our pelvic bones, form the base of our “core” muscles.  Our core muscles are the “barrel” of muscles in our midsection.  The top of our core is our diaphragm, the sides are our abdominal, flank, and back muscles, and the bottom of the barrel are our PFM.

The core muscles, including the PFM, are not the glitzy muscles of the body—not those muscles that are for show. Our core muscles are often ignored and do not get much respect, as opposed to the external glamour muscles of our body, including the pectorals, biceps, triceps, quadriceps, latissimus, etc.  In general, muscles that have such “mirror appeal” are not those that will help in terms of sexual and urinary function. Our core muscles are the hidden gems that work diligently behind the scenes—the muscles of major function and not so much form—muscles that have a role that goes way beyond movement, which is the cardinal task of a skeletal muscle.  On a functional basis, we would be much better off having a “chiseled” core as opposed to having “ripped” external muscles, as there is no benefit to having all “show” and no “go.”

The pelvic floor seems to be the lowest caste of the core muscles—the musculus non grata, if you will kindly accept my term. The PFM, however, do deserve serious respect because, although concealed from view, they are responsible for some very powerful and beneficial functions, particularly so when intensified by training.  Although the PFM are not muscles of glamour, they are our muscles of “amour.”

Who Knew? Having “ripped” external glamour muscles might help get your romance going, but having a chiseled core and conditioned PFM will help keep it going…and going…and going!

The female pelvic floor muscles, exercises for which were popularized by gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel, have long been recognized as an important structural and functional component of the female pelvis. But who has ever heard of the male pelvic floor?  The male pelvic floor has been largely unrecognized and relegated as having far less significance than the female pelvic floor.  Yet from a functional standpoint, these muscles are of vital importance, certainly as critical to male genital-urinary health as they are to female genital-urinary health.

The PFM, as with other muscles in the body, are subject to the forces of adaptation.  Unused as they are intended, they can suffer from “disuse atrophy.” Used appropriately as designed by nature, they can remain in a healthy structural and functional state. When targeted exercise is applied to them, particularly against the forces of resistance, their structure and function, as that of any other skeletal muscle, can be enhanced.

The key responsibility of most of our skeletal muscles is for joint movement and locomotion. The core muscles in general, and the PFM in particular, are exceptions to this rule.  Although the core muscles do play a role with respect to movement, of equal importance is their contribution to support, stability, and posture. Consider that the pelvic floor muscles, particularly the superficial PFM, have an essential function in the support, stability and “posture” of the penis.  They should be considered the hidden “jewels” of the pelvis.

Who Knew? If you want your penis to have “outstanding” posture and stability, you want to make sure that your PFM are kept fit and well-conditioned.

The PFM have three main functions that can be summarized by three S’s: support, sphincter, and sex. Support refers to their important role in securing our pelvic organs—the urinary, genital and intestinal tracts—in proper anatomical position. Sphincter function allows us to interrupt our urinary stream and pucker the anus and contributes in a major way to urinary and bowel control.  These vital responsibilities are generally taken for granted until something goes awry. With regard to sexual function, the PFM are active during erection and ejaculation.  They cause a surge of penile blood flow that helps maintain a rigid penile erection throughout sexual activity and at the time of orgasm, contract rhythmically, enabling ejaculation by propelling semen through the urethra.

The PFM can become atrophied, flabby and poorly functional with aging, weight gain, a sedentary lifestyle, saddle sports and other forms of injury and trauma, chronic straining, and surgery.  Sexual inactivity can lead to their loss of tone, texture, and function.  However, PFM integrity and optimum functioning can be maintained into our golden years with attention to a healthy lifestyle, an active sex life, and PFM training, particularly when such exercises are performed against progressive resistance.  The goal of such a regimen is the attainment of broader, thicker and firmer PFM and maintenance and/or restoration of function.

The PFM may physically be the bottom of the barrel of our core, but functionally they are furthermost from the bottom of the barrel.  For those who are already functioning well, an intensive PFM training program—as with any good fitness regimen—can impart better performance, increased strength (rigidity), improved endurance (ejaculatory control), and decreased recovery time (the amount of time it takes to achieve another erection).  Keeping the PFM supple and healthy can help prevent the typical decline in function that accompanies the aging process. On so many domains, diligently practiced PFM exercises will allow one to reap tangible rewards, as they are the very essence of functional fitness—training one’s body to handle real-life situations and overcome life’s daily obstacles.

Andrew Siegel, M.D.

Author of: Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health; in press and available in e-book and paperback formats in April 2014.

www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Author of Promiscuous Eating: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food: www.promiscuouseating.com

Available on Amazon in Kindle edition

Author of Finding Your Own Fountain of Youth: The Essential Guide For Maximizing Health, Wellness, Fitness & Longevity  (free electronic download) www.findyourfountainofyouth.com 

Amazon page: amazon.com/author/andrewsiegel

For more info on Dr. Siegel: http://www.about.me/asiegel913