Posts Tagged ‘overactive bladder’

Kegels-on-Demand: Use Them As Needed

March 24, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD   3/24/2018

The concept of pelvic floor muscle training is not just to develop a strong and flexible pelvic floor, but also to put that capacity into practical use.  By knowing how to use your pelvic floor in real-life situations, you can improve your quality of life and many pelvic floor-related issues that may have surfaced over the years. This is the  essence of “functional fitness.”   Although this entry is primarily geared towards females, Kegels-on-demand on equally useful for men who have overactive bladder, stress incontinence, tension myalgia and premature ejaculation.

shutterstock_femalebluepelvic

 

Putting Your Pelvic Floor Muscle Training Into Action: Kegels-on-demand

Functional pelvic fitness is the practical and actionable means of applying pelvic floor muscle (PFM) proficiency to common everyday activities to improve pelvic function. This encompasses the knowledge of how to contract and relax PFM muscles through their full range of motion in the real world (as opposed to isolated, out-of-context contractions), when to do so, how often do so and why to do so.  For many women, this is the essence of PFMT–having stronger and more durable PFM to improve their quality of life.  These purposeful and consciously applied PFM contractions are not intended as exercise or training—although they will secondarily serve that purpose—but as management of the various pelvic floor dysfunctions at the times and moments that the problems become apparent.  When practiced diligently, these targeted PFM contractions can ultimately become automatic and reflex behaviors.

“Gotta” Go: Urgency Management

When you feel the sudden and urgent desire to urinate or move your bowels, snap your PFM several times, briefly but intensively. When your PFM are so engaged, the bladder muscle reflexively relaxes and the feeling of intense urgency should disappear. Understand that this is most effective when the bladder or bowels are not full, but are contracting involuntarily.

Staying Dry

For urgency incontinence, prior to exposure to the specific provoking trigger—hand washing, key in the door, running water, entering the shower, cold or rainy weather, etc.—snap your PFM rapidly several times to preempt the involuntary bladder contraction before it occurs (or diminish or abort the bladder contraction after it begins).

With respect to stress urinary incontinence (SUI), by actively contracting the PFM immediately before exposure to the activity that prompts the SUI, the incontinence can be improved or prevented. For example, if changing position from sitting to standing results in SUI, do a brisk short duration PFM contraction prior to and when transitioning from sitting to standing to brace the PFM and pinch the urethra shut.

Keeping Your Insides In

If you have pelvic organ prolapse (POP) and have defined activities that cause the prolapsed pelvic organ to drop or protrude—often standing, bending or straining—engage the PFM prior to or during these triggers. If you need to manually reduce the POP (by pushing the prolapse in with your fingers), after doing so, consciously engage the PFM to maintain the prolapsed pelvic organ in its proper anatomical position.

Better Sex for You and Your Partner

Integrate your newfound PFM powers in the bedroom and intensify your sensation as well as his by tightening your vaginal “grip” around his penis during sexual intercourse.  Alternatively, you can pulse your PFM rhythmically while pelvic thrusting or pulse your PFM without pelvic thrusting, the snapping providing penile stimulation in the absence of active thrusting.

As you develop increasing PFM proficiency, you may be able to selectively contract individual PFM in isolation, simultaneously, or in such a sequence that can result in a titillating experience for both you and your partner. You may be able to develop as much fine motor control of your vagina as you have of your fingers and hands! At the time of sexual climax, focus on the involuntary rhythmic contractions of your PFM and try to heighten the experience by explosively contracting them.

Try This: “Pompoir” is a technique in which a woman contracts her PFM rhythmically to stimulate the penis without the need for pelvic motion or thrusting. Women who diligently practice Kegel training can develop powerful PFM and become particularly adept at this, resulting in extreme vaginal “dexterity” and the ability to refine pulling, pushing, locking, gripping, pulsing, squeezing and twisting motions, which can provide enough stimulation to bring a male to climax. 

Relaxing the High-strung Pelvic Floor

If you suffer with tension myalgia of the PFM, focus on consciously unclenching the PFM over the course of your day. Be particularly aware of the natural PFM relaxation that occurs when urinating or moving your bowels and strive to replicate that feeling of PFM release.

 Limber hip rotators,

A powerful cardio-core,

But forget not

The oft-neglected pelvic floor.

 

Wishing you the best of health!

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

 MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (female version is in the works): PelvicRx

 

 

 

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Nuts and Bolts of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training: Part 4

March 3, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD   3/3/2018

There are few, if any, pelvic programs in existence targeted for specific pelvic floor dysfunctions, as what you will generally find is a “one-size-fits-all” approach.

What follows are focused pelvic training programs, each designed for the nuances of the specific pelvic dysfunction at hand.  I have designed a general program as well as programs for poor pelvic muscle endurance, stress urinary incontinence (SUI), overactive bladder (OAB), pelvic organ prolapse (POP)/vaginal laxity, sexual/orgasm issues, bowel incontinence and pelvic pain. These programs have been carefully crafted based on my specialized training in pelvic medicine and surgery, clinical experience, interactions with physical therapists, exercise/fitness experts, Pilates and yoga instructors, and most importantly, my patients.

 General PFMT Program

The general program is a balanced program that incorporates strength and endurance training.  It is intended for women who are found to have poor PFM strength or poor strength and endurance on the preliminary testing. It is also appropriate for women without specific pelvic issues who wish to pursue a PFM exercise program to make their PFM stronger, more durable and to help prevent the onset of pelvic floor issues.

Perform the following: 3 sets; one-minute break between each set; do 3-4 times weekly; with each week try to step up the intensity of the PFM contractions and duration of the short contractions; allot equal time to relaxing phase as contracting phase; refer back to previous pages if you need a refresher on snaps, shorts and sustained.

 Week 1: snaps x20; 2-5 second shorts x15; 10 second sustained x1 = 1 set 

 Week 2: snaps x30; 2-5 second shorts x20; 10 second sustained x2 = 1 set 

 Week 3: snaps x40; 2-5 second shorts x25; 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

 Week 4: snaps x50; 2-5 second shorts x30; 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

Week 5 and on: Advance to resistance training. However, if you were severely challenged by this non-resistance program or cannot or prefer not to use resistance—which requires the placement of a device in your vagina—you can continue this as a “maintenance” program, consisting of the Week 4 regimen performed twice weekly (as opposed to every other day).

 PFMT for Poor PFM Endurance

This program is designed for those with satisfactory PFM strength (Oxford grades 3-5), but poor endurance. The number of contractions performed and contraction duration are gradually increased over the course of the training program as adaptation occurs.

Perform the following: 3 sets; one-minute break between each set; do 3-4 times weekly; allot equal time to relaxing phase as contracting phase.

 Week 1: snaps x15; 2 second shorts x15; 6 second sustained x1 = 1 set 

 Week 2: snaps x25; 3 second shorts x20; 8 second sustained x2 = 1 set 

 Week 3: snaps x35; 4 second shorts x25; 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

 Week 4: snaps x50; 5 second shorts x30; 10 second sustained x4 = 1 set 

 Week 5 and on: Advance to resistance training.  If you found yourself severely challenged by this non-resistance program or cannot/prefer not to use resistance (which requires the placement of a device in your vagina), you can continue this as a “maintenance” program consisting of the Week 4 regimen performed twice weekly (as opposed to every other day).

PFMT for POP/Vaginal Laxity

Endurance training is especially relevant for those with POP and poor vaginal tone. Focusing on sustained contractions will benefit the slow twitch endurance PFM fibers that are the prime contributors to pelvic tone and support. 

 Perform the following: 3 sets; one-minute break between each set; do 3-4 times weekly; with each successive week, work on stepping up the intensity of the PFM contractions; allot equal time to relaxing phase as contracting phase.

 Week 1: snaps x20; 2-5 second shorts x15; 10 second sustained x1 = 1 set 

 Week 2: snaps x30; 2-5 second shorts x20; 10 second sustained x2 = 1 set 

 Week 3: snaps x40; 2-5 second shorts x25; 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

 Week 4: snaps x50; 2-5 second shorts x30; 10 second sustained x4 = 1 set 

 Week 5 and on: Advance to resistance training.  However, if you were severely challenged by this non-resistance program or cannot or prefer not to use resistance—which requires the placement of a device in your vagina—you can continue using this as a “maintenance” program, which will consist of the Week 4 regimen performed twice weekly (as opposed to every other day).

PFMT for Sexual/Orgasm Issues

The PFM contract intensively at the time of climax with each contraction lasting about 0.8 of a second, about how long snaps last. A series of vigorous snaps is precisely the PFM contraction pattern experienced at the time of orgasm. If you have issues with achieving an orgasm or with orgasm intensity, this natural contraction pattern is replicated in this program, which focuses on high-intensity pulses of the PFM (snaps) that benefit the fast twitch explosive fibers.  Endurance training is also important for sexual function since sustained contractions benefit the slow twitch endurance PFM fibers that contribute to pelvic support and vaginal tone.    

Perform the following: 3 sets; one-minute break between each set; do 3-4 times weekly; with each week work on stepping up the intensity of the snap PFM contractions; allot equal time to relaxing phase as contracting phase.

Week 1: snaps x30; 2-5 second shorts x15; 10 second sustained x1 = 1 set 

Week 2: snaps x40; 2-5 second shorts x20; 10 second sustained x2 = 1 set 

Week 3: snaps x50; 2-5 second shorts x25; 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

Week 4: snaps x60; 2-5 second shorts x30; 10 second sustained x4 = 1 set 

Week 5 and on: Advancing to the resistance training.  However, if you were severely challenged by this non-resistance program or cannot/prefer not to use resistance—which requires the placement of a device in your vagina—you can continue using this as a “maintenance” program, consisting of the Week 4 regimen performed twice weekly (as opposed to every other day).

PFMT for SUI

Strength and power training are critical for managing SUI, with the power element (i.e., how rapidly you can maximally contract your PFM) vital in order to react quickly to SUI triggers.  Focusing on moderate intensity contractions that last for several seconds (shorts) will benefit SUI, as this type of PFM contraction deployed prior to and during any activity that induces the SUI will help prevent its occurrence.  Attention directed to these short contractions will allow earlier activation of the PFM with SUI triggers, as well as increased contraction strength and durability to counteract the sudden increase in abdominal pressure that induces SUI.  Effort applied to sustained contractions is equally important since the slow twitch endurance PFM fibers are prime contributors to pelvic tone and pelvic support of the urethra, which promote urinary continence.

Perform the following: 3 sets; one-minute break between each set; do 3-4 times weekly; with each successive week try to step up the PFM contraction intensity as well as the activation speed (how long it takes to get to peak intensity); allot equal time to relaxing phase as contracting phase.

Week 1: snaps x20; 5 second shorts x15; 10 second sustained x1 = 1 set 

Week 2: snaps x30; 5 second shorts x20; 10 second sustained x2 = 1 set 

Week 3: snaps x40; 5 second shorts x25; 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

Week 4: snaps x50; 5 second shorts x30; 10 second sustained x4 = 1 set 

Week 5 and on: Advance to resistance training.  However, if you were severely challenged by this non-resistance program or cannot or prefer not to use resistance—which requires the placement of a device in your vagina—you can continue this as a “maintenance” program, which consists of the Week 4 regimen performed twice weekly (as opposed to every other day).

PFMT for OAB and Urinary/Bowel Incontinence

Focusing on high-intensity pulses of the PFM (snaps) will benefit the fast twitch explosive fibers that are critical for inhibiting urinary and bowel urgency/urgency incontinence. These snaps will generate increased PFM strength and power to enhance the inhibitory reflex between PFM and the bladder/bowel, permitting a speedy reaction to urgency and facilitating the means to counteract urinary and bowel urgency, frequency and incontinence. Of equal importance is endurance training of the slow twitch, fatigue-resistant fibers that contribute to baseline tone of the voluntary urinary and bowel sphincters.

Perform the following: 3 sets; one-minute break between each set; do 3-4 times weekly; with each successive week try to step up the intensity of the PFM contractions; allot equal time to relaxing phase as contracting phase.

Week 1: snaps x20; 2-5 second shorts x15; 10 second sustained x1 = 1 set 

Week 2: snaps x30; 2-5 second shorts x20; 10 second sustained x2 = 1 set 

Week 3: snaps x40; 2-5 second shorts x25; 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

Week 4: snaps x50; 2-5 second shorts x30; 10 second sustained x4 = 1 set 

Week 5 and on: Advance to resistance training.  However, if you were severely challenged by this non-resistance program or cannot/prefer not to use resistance (which requires the placement of a device in your vagina), you can continue using this as a “maintenance” program, which will consist of the Week 4 regimen performed twice weekly (as opposed to every other day).

PFMT for Pelvic Pain Due to Tension Myalgia: “Reverse” PFMT

Focusing on the relaxing aspect of the PFM contraction/relaxation cycle is the key to “down-train” the PFM from their over-tensioned, knot-like state. Those with over-contracted and over-toned PFM will not benefit from the typical strengthening PFMT done for most PFM dysfunctions—and can actually worsen their condition—so the emphasis here is on the relaxation phase of the PFM. This is “reverse” PFMT, conscious unclenching of the PFM in which the PFM drop and slacken as opposed to rise and contract. Reverse PFMT strives to stretch, relax, lengthen and increase the flexibility of the PFM. 

“Reverse” Kegels can be a confusing and difficult concept, particularly because these exercises demand conscious relaxation of the PFM, which only occurs subconsciously in real life. Recall that the PFM have a baseline level of tone and that complete PFM relaxation only occurs at the time of urination, bowel movements, passing gas or childbirth. 

To make this easier to understand, think of a PFM contraction on a scale of 0-10, with 0 being complete relaxation and 10 being maximal contraction. I have arbitrarily chosen 2 as the baseline level of PFM tone.  In reverse Kegel exercises you strive to go from 2 to 0 as opposed to standard exercises in which the effort is to go from 2 to 10.  When you urinate, move your bowels or pass gas, the PFM relax to a level of 0, so this is the feeling that you should strive to replicate, while continuing to breathe regularly without straining or pushing.  A deep exhalation of air will facilitate PFM relaxation, as it does for other muscle groups.

Perform the following: A very gentle PFM contraction to initiate PFM engagement, followed by deep relaxation and release of the PFM lasting as long as the contraction; 3 sets; one-minute break between each set; do 3-4 times weekly.

Week 1: reverse snaps x20; reverse 2-5 shorts x15; reverse 10 second sustained x1 = 1 set 

Week 2: reverse snaps x30; reverse 2-5 shorts x20; reverse 10 second sustained x2 = 1 set 

Week 3: reverse snaps x40; reverse 2-5 shorts x25; reverse 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

Week 4: reverse snaps x50; reverse 2-5 shorts x30; reverse 10 second sustained x3 = 1 set 

Week 5 and on: There is no role for using resistance exercises for tension myalgia. Continue using this program as a “maintenance” program, consisting of the Week 4 regimen done twice weekly (as opposed to every other day). Make a concerted effort at keeping the PFM relaxed at all times, not just while pursuing the PFMT program.

…To be continued.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (the female version is in the works): PelvicRx

 

Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation (PTNS) For Overactive Bladder (OAB)

July 29, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   7/29/17

ptns-v2@2x

PTNS therapy is a non-drug, non-surgical option to treat OAB symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency and urgency incontinence. PTNS consists of 12 weekly sessions in the office, followed by a maintenance regimen. During each 30-minute session, a thin needle electrode is placed into the ankle region and is connected to an external electrical stimulator. Up to 80% of patients improve with minimal, if any, side-effects.

OAB

Overactive bladder is a common and annoying condition present in both females and males marked by episodes of urinary urgency, frequency and, at times, incontinence. A variety of methods can be used to improve symptoms and quality of life, including the following: behavioral modifications, bladder retraining, pelvic floor muscle training, bladder relaxant medications and Botox injections.  Although medications are commonly used for OAB, the problem is that side effects and expense often limit their continued usage.

Neuromodulation

An effective alternative is neuromodulation, the least invasive technique of which is known as PTNS.  PTNS uses a thin, acupuncture-style needle placed in the ankle that is attached to a hand-held device that generates electrical stimulation.  This is a significantly less invasive means of neuromodulation than is Interstim, which requires implantable wire electrodes to be placed in the spine and continuous electrical stimulation with an implantable battery-powered pulse generator. In both instances, the sacral plexus—responsible for regulating bladder and pelvic floor function—is “modulated” by the electrical stimulation, causing a beneficial effect with improvement of OAB symptoms. With PTNS, the electrical stimulation travels up the tibial nerve to the sacral plexus, whereas with Interstim, the sacral plexus is directly stimulated by electrodes.

Nuts and Bolts of PTNS

PTNS involves once weekly visits to the office for 12 weeks, 30 minutes per session.  It can be performed on both female and male patients.

At each session, the patient is seated comfortably with the treatment leg elevated and supported.  A fine caliber needle electrode—similar to an acupuncture needle—is inserted into the inner ankle in the vicinity of the tibial nerve.  A grounding surface electrode is placed as well.  An adjustable electrical pulse is applied to the needle electrode via an external pulse generator. Activation of the tibial nerve is confirmed with a sensory (mild sensation in ankle or sole) and/or a motor (toe flex/fan or foot extension) response. Thereafter, the power of electrical stimulation is adjusted to an appropriate level and the 30-minute session begins. The patient can read, listen to music, nap, meditate, etc.

Clinical Response

Improvement in OAB symptoms often occurs by session 6, sometimes sooner. Patients who respond well to the 12-week protocol may require occasional maintenance treatments.  70-80% of patients will achieve long-term improvement in OAB symptoms. PTNS incurs minimal risks with the most common side effects being mild pain and skin irritation where the needle electrode is placed.

Insurance

PTNS is covered by most insurances, including Medicare.  PTNS cannot be used in patients with pacemakers or implantable defibrillators, those prone to excessive bleeding, those with nerve damage or women who are pregnant or planning to get pregnant during the treatment period.

YouTube on PTNS

“My PTNS” educational program

My nurse practitioner and I will be giving a seminar (free of charge) on PTNS on 7PM on Thursday, September 14, 2017 at the Marriott Hotel, 138 New Pehle Avenue, Saddle Brook, NJ.  Light refreshments will be served.  Space is limited, so if interested, please call 201-487-8866 to reserve a spot.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

Amazon page for Dr. Siegel’s books

 

 

12 STEPS TO OVERCOMING “OVER-ACTIVE” BLADDER (OAB)

May 6, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  5/6/17 (my daughter’s 18th birthday!)

For most people, the urinary bladder is a cooperative and obedient organ, behaving and adhering to its master’s will, squeezing only when appropriate. However, some people have bladders that are unruly and disobedient, acting rashly and irrationally, squeezing at inappropriate times without their master’s permission. This condition is referred to as “overactive bladder” or OAB for short. This problem can occur in both women and men, although it is more common in females.

Picture1

“Gotta go,” the urinary urgency that is the hallmark of OAB

8. UUI

Image above (artist Ashley Halsey from “The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health”) illustrates a bladder contracting involuntarily, leading to urinary leakage

OAB (http://www.njurology.com/overactive-bladder/) is a common condition often due to one’s bladder contracting (squeezing) at any time without warning.  This involuntary bladder contraction can give rise to the symptoms of urgency, frequency (daytime and nighttime) and urgency incontinence. The key symptom of OAB is urinary urgency (a.k.a. “gotta go”), the sudden and compelling desire to urinate that is difficult to postpone.

Although OAB symptoms can occur without specific provocation, they may be triggered by exposure to running water, cold or rainy weather, hand-washing, entering the shower, positional changes such as arising from sitting, and getting nearer and nearer to a bathroom, particularly at the time of placing the key in the door to one’s home.

An evaluation includes a urinalysis (dipstick exam of the urine), a urine culture (test for urinary infection) if indicated, and determination of the post-void residual volume (amount of urine left in bladder immediately after emptying). A 24-hour voiding diary (record of urination documenting time and volume) is an extremely helpful tool.  Urodynamics (test of storage and emptying bladder functions), cystoscopy (visual inspection of inside of bladder), and renal and bladder ultrasound (imaging tests using sound waves) may also prove helpful.

The management of OAB is challenging, yet rewarding, and necessitates a partnership between patient and physician. Successful treatment requires a willing, informed and engaged patient with a positive attitude. Management options for OAB range from non-invasive strategies to pills to surgery. It is sensible to start with the simplest and least invasive means of treatment and progress accordingly to more aggressive and invasive treatments if there is not a satisfactory response to conservative measures.  Behavioral treatments are first-line: fluid management, bladder training, bladder control strategies, pelvic floor muscle training and lifestyle measures.  Behavioral therapies may be combined with medication(s), which are considered second-line treatment. Third-line treatments include neuromodulation (stimulating specific nerves to improve OAB symptoms) and Botox injections into the urinary bladder.

References that will help the process include the following:

Book: THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health www.TheKegelFix.com

Book: MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health www.MalePelvicFitness.com

DVD: Easy-to-use, follow-along, FDA-registered pelvic training program that includes a detailed instruction guide, an interactive DVD and digital access to the guided training routines: www.PelvicRx.com

12 Steps To Overcoming OAB

The goal of the 12 steps that follow is to re-establish control of the urinary bladder.  Providing that the recommendations are diligently adhered to, there can be significant improvement, if not resolution, of OAB symptoms.

  1. FLUID AND CAFFEINE MODERATION/MEDICATION ASSESSMENT  Symptoms of OAB will often not occur until a “critical” urinary volume is reached, and by limiting fluid intake, it will take a longer time to achieve this volume. Try to sensibly restrict your fluid intake in order to decrease the volume of urinary output. Caffeine (present in tea, coffee, colas, some energy drinks and chocolate) and alcohol increase urinary output and are urinary irritants, so it is best to limit intake of these beverages/foods.  Additionally, many foods—particularly fruits and vegetables—have hidden water content, so moderation applies here as well.  It is important to try to consume most of your fluid intake before 7:00 PM to improve nocturnal frequency. Diuretic medications (water pills) can contribute to OAB symptoms. It is worthwhile to check with your medical doctor to see if it is possible to change to an alternative, non-diuretic medication. This will not always be feasible, but if so, may substantially improve your symptoms.
  2. URGENCY INHIBITION Reacting to the first sense of urgency by running to the bathroom needs to be substituted with urgency inhibition techniques. Stop in your tracks, sit, relax and breathe deeply. Pulse your pelvic floor muscles rhythmically (see below) to deploy your own natural reflex to resist and suppress urgency.
  3. TIMED VOIDING (for incontinence) Urinating by the “clock” and not by your own sense of urgency will keep your bladder as empty as possible. By emptying the bladder before the critical volume is reached (at which urgency incontinence occurs), the incontinence can be controlled.  Voiding on a two-hour basis is usually effective, although the specific timetable has to be tailored to the individual in accordance with the voiding diary.  Such “preemptive” or “defensive” voiding is a very useful technique since purposeful urinary frequency is more desirable than incontinence.
  4. BLADDER RETRAINING (for urgency/frequency) This is imposing a gradually increasing interval between voids to establish a more normal pattern of urination. Relying on your own sense of urgency often does not give you accurate information about the status of your bladder fullness.  Urinating by the “clock” and not by your own sense of urgency will keep your voided volumes more appropriate. Voiding on a two-hour basis is usually effective as a starting point, although the specific timetable has to be tailored to the individual, based upon the voiding diary.  A gradual and progressive increase in the interval between voiding can be achieved by consciously delaying urinating.  A goal of an increase in the voiding interval by 15-30 minutes per week is desirable.  Eventually, a return to more acceptable voiding intervals is possible.  The urgency inhibiting techniques mentioned above are helpful with this process.
  5. BOWEL REGULARITY Avoidance of constipation is an important means of helping control OAB symptoms. Because of the proximity of the rectum and bladder, a full rectum can put pressure on the bladder, resulting in worsening of urgency, frequency and incontinence.
  6. PELVIC FLOOR MUSCLE TRAINING (PFMT)  *All patients need to understand the vital role of the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) in inhibiting urgency and frequency and preventing urge leakage.  PFMT voluntarily employs the PFM to help stimulate inhibitory reflexes between the pelvic floor muscles and the bladder.  Rhythmic pulsing of the PFM can inhibit an involuntary contraction once it starts and prevent an involuntary contraction before it even begins. Initially, one must develop an awareness of the presence, location, and nature of the PFM and then train these muscles to increase their strength and tone.  These are not the muscles of the abdominal wall, thighs or buttocks.  A simple means of recognizing the PFM for a female is to insert a finger inside her vagina and squeeze the PFM until the vagina tightens around her finger.  A simple means of identifying the PFM for either gender is to start urinating and when about half completed, to abruptly stop the stream. It is the PFM that allows one to do so. It is important to recognize the specific triggers that induce urgency, frequency or incontinence and prior to exposure to a trigger or at the time of the perceived urgency, rhythmic pulsing of the PFM–“snapping” the PFM several times–can either preempt the abnormal bladder contraction before it occurs or diminish or abort the bladder contraction after it begins.  Thus, by actively squeezing the PFM just before and during these trigger activities, the urgency can be diminished and the urgency incontinence can often be avoided.

oab

Schematic diagram above illustrates the relationship of the contractile state of the bladder muscle to the contractile state of the PFM. Note that a voluntary PFM contraction can turn off an involuntary bladder contraction (+ symbol denotes contraction; – symbol denotes relaxation)

7. LIFESTYLE MEASURES: HEALTHY WEIGHT, EXERCISE, TOBACCO CESSATION   The burden of excess pounds can worsen OAB issues by putting pressure on the urinary bladder. Even a modest weight loss may improve OAB symptoms.  Pursuing physical activities can help maintain general fitness and improve urinary control. Lower impact exercises–yoga, Pilates, cycling, swimming, etc.–can best help alleviate pressure on the urinary bladder by boosting core muscle strength and tone and improving posture and alignment. The chemical constituents of tobacco constrict blood vessels, impair blood flow, decrease tissue oxygenation and promote inflammation, compromising the bladder, urethra and PFM.  By eliminating tobacco, symptoms of OAB can be improved. 

8.  BLADDER RELAXANT MEDICATIONS A variety of medications are useful to suppress OAB symptoms. It may take several trials of different medications or combinations of medications to achieve optimal results. The medications include the following: Tolterodine (Detrol LA), Oxybutynin (Ditropan XL), Transdermal Oxybutynin (Oxytrol patch), Oxybutynin gel (Gelnique), Trospium (Sanctura), Solifenacin (Vesicare), Darifenacin (Enablex) and Fesoterodine (Toviaz).  The most common side effects are dry mouth and constipation.  These medications cannot be used in the presence of urinary or gastric retention or uncontrolled narrow-angle glaucoma.  The newest medication, Mirabegron (Myrbetriq), has a different mechanism of action and fewer side effects.

9.  BIOFEEDBACK This is an adjunct to PFMT in which electronic instrumentation is used to relay feedback information about your PFM contractions.  This can enhance awareness and strength of the PFM.

10.  BOTOX TREATMENT This is a simple office procedure in which Botox is injected directly into the bladder muscle, helping reduce OAB symptoms by relaxing those areas of the bladder into which it is injected. Botox injections generally will last for six to nine months and are covered by Medicare and most insurance companies.

11.  PERCUTANEOUS TIBIAL NERVE STIMULATION (PTNS) This is a minimally invasive form of neuromodulation in which a tiny acupuncture-style needle is inserted near the tibial nerve in the ankle and a hand-held stimulator generates electrical stimulation with the intent of improving OAB symptoms. This is done once weekly for 12 weeks.

12.  INTERSTIM This is a more invasive form of neuromodulation in which electrical impulses are used to stimulate and modulate sacral nerves in an effort to relieve the OAB symptoms. A battery-powered neuro-stimulator (bladder “pacemaker”) provides the mild electrical impulses that are carried by a small lead wire to stimulate the selected sacral nerves that affect bladder function.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Female Bladder Works

February 11, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   2/11/17

This entry is a brief overview of bladder anatomy and function to help you better understand the two most common forms of urinary leakage—stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder— topics for entries that will follow for the next few weeks.  Having a working knowledge of the properties of the bladder will serve you well in being able to understand when things go awry. 

                          6. bladder

                             Drawing of the bladder and urethra by Ashley Halsey from “The Kegel Fix:                           Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health”

The bladder is a muscular balloon that has two functions—storage and emptying of urine. The stem of the bladder balloon is the urethra, the tube that conducts urine from the bladder during urination and helps store urine at all other times. The urethra runs from the bladder neck (where the urinary bladder and urethra join) to the urethral meatus, the external opening located just above the vagina.

Bladder Control Issues—More Than Just a Physical Problem

Urinary incontinence is an involuntary leakage of urine. Although not life threatening, it can be life altering and life disrupting. Many resort to absorbent pads to help deal with this debilitating, yet manageable problem. It is more than just a medical problem, often affecting emotional, psychological, social and financial wellbeing (the cumulative cost of pads can be significant). Many are reluctant to participate in activities that provoke the incontinence, resulting in social isolation, loss of self-esteem and, at times, depression. Since exercise is a common trigger, many avoid it, which can lead to weight gain and a decline in fitness. Sufferers often feel “imprisoned” by their bladders, which have taken control over their lives, impacting not only activities, but also clothing choices, travel plans and relationships.

Bladder Function 101

Healthy bladder functioning depends upon properties of the bladder and urethra. Bladder control issues arise when one or more of these go awry:

Capacity

The average adult has a bladder that holds about 12 ounces before a significant urge to urinate occurs. Problem: The most common capacity issue is when the capacity is too small, causing urinary frequency.

Elasticity

The bladder is stretchy like a balloon and as it fills up there is a minimal increase in bladder pressure because of this expansion. Low-pressure storage is desirable, as the less pressure in the bladder, the less likelihood for leakage issues. Problem: The bladder is inelastic or less elastic and stores urine at high pressures, a setup for urinary leakage.

Sensation

There is an increasing feeling of urgency as the urine volume in the bladder increases. Problem: The most common sensation issue is heightened sensation creating a sense of urgency before the bladder is full, giving rise to the frequent need to urinate. Less commonly there exists a situation in which there is little to no sensation even when the bladder is quite full (and little warning that the bladder is full), sometimes causing the bladder to overflow.

Contractility

After the bladder fills and the desire to urinate is sensed, a voluntary bladder contraction occurs, which increases the pressure within the bladder in order to generate the power to urinate. Problem: The bladder is “under-active” and cannot generate enough pressure to empty effectively, which may cause it to overflow when large volumes of urine remain in the bladder.

Timing

A bladder contraction should only occur after the bladder is reasonably full and the “owner” of the bladder makes a conscious decision to empty the bladder. Problem: The bladder is “overactive” and squeezes prematurely (involuntary bladder contraction) causing sudden urgency with the possibility of urinary leakage occurring en route to the bathroom.

Anatomical Position

The bladder and urethra are maintained in proper anatomical position in the pelvis because of the pelvic floor muscles and connective tissue support. Problem: A weakened support system can cause urinary leakage with sudden increases in abdominal pressure, such as occurs with sneezing, coughing and/or exercising.

Urethra

In cross-section, the urethra has infoldings of its inner layer that give it a “snowflake” appearance. This inner layer is surrounded by rich spongy tissue containing an abundance of blood vessels, creating a cushion around the urethra that permits a watertight seal similar to a washer in a sink. The female hormone estrogen nourishes the urethra and helps maintain the seal. Problem: With declining levels of estrogen at the time of menopause, the urethra loses tone and suppleness, analogous to a washer in a sink becoming brittle, potentially causing leakage issues.

Sphincters

The urinary sphincters, located at the bladder neck and mid-urethra, are specialized muscles that provide urinary control by pinching the urethra closed during storage and allowing the urethra to open during emptying. The main sphincter (a.k.a. the internal sphincter) is located at the bladder neck and is composed of smooth muscle designed for involuntary, sustained control. The auxiliary sphincter (a.k.a. the external sphincter), located further downstream and comprised of skeletal muscle contributed to by the pelvic floor muscles, is designed for voluntary, emergency control. Problem: Damage to or weakness of the sphincters adversely affects urinary control.

The main sphincter is similar to the brakes of a car—frequently used, efficient and effective. The auxiliary sphincter is similar to the emergency brake—much less frequently used, less efficient, but effective in a pinch. The pelvic floor muscles are intimately involved with the function of the “emergency brake.”

Nerves

The seemingly “simple” act of urination is actually a highly complex event requiring a functional nervous system providing sensation of filling, contraction of the bladder muscle and the coordinated relaxation of the sphincters. Problem: Any neurological problem can adversely affect urination, causing bladder control issues.

Bladder Reflexes

A reflex is an automatic response to a stimulus, an action that occurs without conscious thought. There are three reflexes that are vital to bladder control:

Guarding Reflex: During bladder filling, the “guarding” (against leakage) pelvic floor muscles contract in increasing magnitude in proportion to the volume of urine in the bladder; this provides resistance that helps prevent leakage as the bladder becomes fuller.

Cough Reflex: With a cough, there is a reflex contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, which helps prevent leakage with sudden increases in abdominal pressure.

Pelvic Floor Muscle-Bladder Reflex: When the pelvic floor muscles are voluntarily contracted, there is a reflex relaxation of the bladder. This powerful reflex can be tapped into for those who have involuntary bladder contractions that cause urgency and urgency leakage.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.wordpress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery. Much of the content of this entry was excerpted from his recently published book The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health: http://www.TheKegelFix.com

He is also the author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

What You Don’t Know About Your Pelvic Floor Muscles, But Should

June 18, 2016

Andrew Siegel, M.D. 6/18/16

* Please note that although this entry is written for women, it is equally applicable to men.

In dogs, the pelvic floor muscles (PFM) play an important role with respect to tail position and movement. They are responsible for tail wagging in circumstances when dogs are happy and for the tail being held down between the legs when dogs are frightened or anxious. Weak PFM are virtually unheard of in the canine population, suggesting that with constant tail movement, the PFM are exercised sufficiently to maintain tone and vitality.

 

foot in water bowl

Photo above is Charley, my English Springer Spaniel.  Note her happy, erect tail and her curious habit of eating with her foot in her water bowl.

For better or worse, humans do not have tails to wag or place between our legs.  Tails became extinct with the evolutionary process (with the exception of the character played by Jason Alexander in the movie “Shallow Hal”). If we did have tails, our PFM would likely get a great deal more exercise than they typically do.

Sadly, the PFM don’t get the respect that the glitzy, for-show, mirror-appealing, external glamour muscles do. However, the PFM are hidden gems that work diligently behind the scenes–muscles of major function and not so much form-offering numerous powers and benefits, particularly so when intensified by training. Although not muscles of glamour, they are muscles of “amour,” and have a profoundly important role in sexual, urinary, and bowel function as well as in supporting our pelvic organs.

What are the PFM?

The PFM—commonly known as the “Kegel muscles”—are a muscular hammock that form the bottom of the pelvis. They are also referred to as the “saddle” muscles because you sit on them when seated on a bicycle. They are part of the “core” group of muscles.

What are the “core” muscles?

The core muscles are the “barrel” of muscles comprising the torso, consisting of the abdominal muscles in front, the lumbar muscles in back, the diaphragm muscle on top and the PFM on the bottom. The core muscles are responsible for stabilizing the pelvis and holding the spine erect.

1.core muscles

                              Illustration of core muscles by Ashley Halsey from                                            The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health

Where are the PFM?

The deep PFM (pubococcygeus, iliococcygeus, coccygeus) span from the pubic bone in front to the tailbone in the back, and from pelvic sidewall to pelvic sidewall, between the “sit” bones.

2.deep PFM              Illustration of deep PFM muscles by Ashley Halsey

The superficial PFM (ischiocavernosus, bulbocavernosus, transverse perineal, anal sphincter) are situated under the surface of the external genitals and anus.

3. superficial and deep PFM

            Illustration of superficial and deep PFM muscles by Ashley Halsey

 

What is the function of the PFM?                                                                      

The PFM muscles intertwine with the muscles of the vagina, bladder and rectum,  provide support for the pelvic organs, play a vital role in sexual function and contribute to the control mechanism of the urinary and intestinal tracts.

What is PFM dysfunction?

PFM “dysfunction” is a common condition referring to when the PFM are not functioning properly. PFM dysfunction ranges from “low tone” to “high tone.” Low tone occurs when the PFM lack in strength and endurance and is often associated with stress urinary incontinence (urinary leakage with coughing, sneezing, laughing, exercising and other physical activities), pelvic organ prolapse (when one or more of the pelvic organs fall into the space of the vagina and at times outside the vagina) and altered sexual function (decreased sensation, difficulty accommodating a penis because of looseness, difficulty achieving climax, etc.). High tone occurs when the PFM are too tense and unable to relax, giving rise to a pain syndrome known as pelvic floor tension myalgia (this situation is entirely analogous to the high-strung dog with its tail between its legs).

Trivia: PFM dysfunction often causes symptoms in several domains, e.g., women with urinary control issues often have trouble achieving orgasm, both problems contributed to by weak PFM.

What causes PFM dysfunction?

The PFM can become weakened, flabby and poorly functional with pregnancy, labor, childbirth, menopause, weight gain, a sedentary lifestyle, poor posture, sports injuries, pelvic trauma, chronic straining, pelvic surgery, diabetes, tobacco use, steroid use, and disuse atrophy (not exercising the PFM). Sexual inactivity can lead to their loss of tone, texture and function. With aging there is a decline in the bulk and contractility of the PFM, often resulting in PFM dysfunction.

Why are the PFM so vital to your health?

The PFM are perhaps the most versatile yet under-appreciated muscle group in your body. They provide vaginal tone, support to the pelvic organs, a healthy sexual response–enhancing arousal and orgasm–and urinary and bowel sphincter control. They play a key role in your ability to carry and deliver a baby as well as contributing to the mobility and stability of your torso.

A simplified way of thinking of the female pelvic organs–bladder, uterus and bowel–is as “storage containers” for urine, fetuses, and stool, respectively. Each organ is connected to the outside world by tubular structures, the urethra, vagina and anal canal, respectively, through which flow the contents of the organs. The PFM play a strong role in compressing the tubes for storage and relaxing them for emptying.

What Is the muscle function of the PFM?

Whereas most skeletal muscles function as movers (joint movement and locomotion), the PFM are unique in that they function as stabilizers—helping to keep the pelvic organs in proper position—and compressors—helping to tighten the vagina, urethra and rectum—important to urinary and bowel control as well as to sexual function. During sex the PFM activate, causing a surge of genital blood flow that helps lubrication and clitoral engorgement; at the time of orgasm, the PFM contract rhythmically.

Why bother exercising your PFM?                                                        

The PFM are out of sight and out of mind; however, they have vital functions, so are muscles that you should be exercising. PFM training is based upon solid exercise science and can help maintain PFM integrity and optimal function into old age. The PFM are capable of making adaptive changes when targeted exercise is applied to them. Pelvic training involves gaining facility with both the contracting and the relaxing phases of PFM function. Their structure and function can be enhanced, resulting in broader, thicker and firmer PFM with a stronger resting tone and the ability to generate a powerful contraction at will. PFM training can be effective in stabilizing, relieving, improving and even preventing issues with pelvic support, sexual function, and urinary and bowel control. In addition to the muscle-training benefit of PFM training, it also supports tissue healing by stimulating the flow of oxygenated, nutritionally-rich blood to the vagina and other pelvic organs.

Because of pregnancy, labor and delivery, the PFM get stretched more than any other muscle group in the body. Through pelvic training, the PFM have the capacity of rebounding from this obstetrical “trauma,” recovering tone and function. Prenatal pelvic training can help fortify the PFM in preparation for pregnancy, labor and delivery.

Bottom Line: The PFM may literally be at the bottom of the barrel of our core muscles, but in terms of their important functions, they are figuratively furthermost from the “bottom of the barrel.” Without functioning PFM, your organs would dangle out of your pelvis, you would be wearing adult diapers and your sexual function would be non-existent. It behooves you to keep these vital muscles in tip-top shape. 

Please check out the following 3 minute video entitled “Why Kegel?”:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kclY1vY3wG8

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo; paperback edition available at TheKegelFix.com

Author page on Amazon: 

http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

The Kegel Fix trailer: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc  

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

10 Reasons For Men To Kegel

June 4, 2016

Andrew Siegel, M.D. 6/4/16

The pelvic floor muscles—a.k.a. the Kegel muscles—are internal, hidden and behind-the-scenes muscles, yet they are vital to a healthy life. There are numerous advantages to keeping them fit and robust with pelvic floor exercises.  Last week’s entry detailed why this is the case for females and today’s will explain how and why are equally beneficial for males.  As the saying goes: “What’s good for the goose is good for the gander,” and when it comes to the pelvic floor, this is an absolute truth.  Kegel popularized these exercises for females and it is my intent to do the same for men!   If you would like more information on pelvic floor muscle training in men, visit AndrewSiegelMD.com, the opening page of which has the link to a review article I wrote for the Gold Journal of Urology on the topic. 

 

pixabay image

  10 REASONS FOR MEN TO DO KEGEL EXERCISES 

  1. To improve/prevent erectile dysfunction.
  1. To improve/prevent premature ejaculation.
  1. To improve/prevent ejaculatory dysfunction (skimpy ejaculation volumes, weak ejaculation force and arc, diminished ejaculatory sensation).
  1. To improve/prevent post-void dribbling (that annoying after-dribble of urine that occurs after finishing urinating).
  1. To improve/prevent stress urinary incontinence (leakage with coughing, sneezing, exercise, etc.) that may occur following prostate surgery.
  1. To improve/prevent urinary and bowel urgency (“gotta go”) and urinary and bowel urgency incontinence (inability to get to the bathroom on time to prevent an accident).
  1. To improve/prevent pelvic pain due to pelvic floor tension myalgia by learning how to relax your pelvic floor muscles.
  1. To help prevent pelvic impairments from high impact sports and saddle sports (e.g., cycling, motorcycling and horseback riding).
  1. To improve core strength, posture, lumbar stability, alignment and balance.
  1. To maintain good health and youthful vitality.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo; paperback edition available at TheKegelFix.com

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc  

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

10 Reasons For Women To Kegel

May 28, 2016

 Andrew Siegel, M.D. 5/28/16

The pelvic floor muscles—a.k.a. the Kegel muscles—are internal, hidden and behind-the-scenes muscles, yet they are vital to a healthy existence. There are numerous advantages to keeping them robust and fit with Kegel pelvic floor exercises.  Today’s entry enumerates why this is the case for females and next week’s entry will detail why Kegels are equally beneficial for males.

 

Cover

10 GOOD REASONS FOR WOMEN TO DO KEGEL EXERCISES

  1. To enable you to have a more comfortable pregnancy, a smoother labor and delivery and a faster recovery.
  1. To improve/prevent pelvic relaxation (dropped bladder, uterus, rectum, etc.) and vaginal laxity (looseness).
  1. To improve/prevent sexual and orgasm issues. 
  1. To enhance sexual pleasure for you and your partner.
  1. To improve/prevent stress urinary incontinence (leakage with coughing, sneezing, exercise, etc.).
  1. To improve/prevent urinary and bowel urgency (“gotta go”) and urinary and bowel urgency incontinence (inability to get to the bathroom on time to prevent an accident).
  1. To improve/prevent pelvic pain due to pelvic floor tension myalgia by learning how to relax your pelvic floor muscles.
  1. To help prevent pelvic impairments from high impact sports and saddle sports (e.g., cycling, motorcycling and horseback riding).
  1. To improve core strength, posture, lumbar stability, alignment and balance.
  1. To maintain good health and youthful vitality.

 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo; paperback edition available at TheKegelFix.com

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc  

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

The Pelvic (Kegel) Revolution

April 23, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD  4/23/16

b016110 

(photo above: Dr. Arnold Kegel, Gladser Studio, 1953)

A Brief Recap from Last Week

In the 1940s, the seminal work of Los Angeles gynecologist Dr. Arnold Kegel resulted in pelvic floor exercises achieving the stature and acclaim that they deserved. His legacy is the name that many use to refer to pelvic exercises—“Kegels” or “Kegel exercises.” Despite Kegel’s pelvic regimen proving effective for many female pelvic issues (pelvic relaxation, vaginal laxity and sexual issues, urinary leakage, etc.) what came to be referred to as Kegel exercises in the post-Kegel era had little resemblance to what he so brilliantly described in his classic series of medical articles sixty-five years ago. His regimen incorporated a critical focus and intensity that were unfortunately not upheld in most of the pelvic floor muscle training programs that followed his reign.

The Pelvic (Kegel) Revolution

After years of “stagnancy” following the transformative work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, there is a resurgence of interest in the pelvic floor and in the benefits of pelvic floor training. In 2016, we are in the midst of a pelvic floor “sea change” that is gaining momentum and traction. There is increasing recognition of pelvic floor dysfunction (when pelvic floor function goes awry) as the root cause for a variety of pelvic issues including pelvic organ prolapse, stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder, sexual dysfunction and pelvic pain syndromes. There is an evolution in progress with respect to management of pelvic floor dysfunction, including “smart” pelvic floor muscle programs that are tailored to the specific pelvic floor dysfunction, the advent of a host of novel, high-technology pelvic floor training resistance devices and the expanding use of a specialty niche of physical therapy—pelvic floor physical therapy.  Of note, pelvic floor physical therapy has been popular in Europe for many years and it is only recently that its utility has been recognized in the USA. (I am grateful for the wonderful services provided by my pelvic physiotherapy colleagues who have been so helpful and beneficial for many of my patients with pelvic floor dysfunctions.)

It is my belief that the next few years will bear witness to continued advances in pelvic floor muscle training and focus that will restore pelvic training to the classic sense established by Arnold Kegel—a “renaissance” to a new era of “pelvic enlightenment.” Books such as The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health (www.TheKegelFix.com) introduce new-age, next-generation pelvic programs—progressive, home-based, tailored exercise programs consisting of strength, power and endurance training regimens—designed and customized for each specific pelvic floor dysfunction. 2016 will usher in the availability of high quality follow-along pelvic training programs, e.g., the PelvicRx (www.PelvicRx.com)—a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered training regimen accessible via DVD or streaming. Furthermore, based upon Dr. Kegel’s perineometer resistance device, technological advances have resulted in the emergence of numerous pelvic floor muscle training devices, many of which are sophisticated means of providing resistance, biofeedback and tracking, often via Bluetooth connectivity to a smartphone. Although most provide the same basic functionality—insertion into the vagina, connection to a smartphone app, biofeedback and tracking—each has its own unique features. This market for resistance devices is evolving at a remarkably rapid pace.

Another major refinement is the concept of functional pelvic fitness—teaching patients how to put their pelvic knowledge and skills to real life use with practical and actionable means of applying pelvic muscle proficiency to daily tasks and common everyday activities, an area that has been sorely neglected in the past, with prior emphasis solely on achieving a conditioned pelvic floor.

An additional element of the pelvic revolution is the increasing awareness and acceptance by the urological-gynecological-gastrointestinal community of the concept that stress and other psychosocial factors can give rise to physical complaints such as pelvic floor tension myalgia, a condition in which the pelvic floor muscles exist in an over-contracted, painful state. At one time, this diagnostic entity was not even a consideration; however, an understanding of this condition is slowly gaining recognition and traction and there is a burgeoning understanding that many pelvic pain issues (interstitial cystitis/chronic pelvic pain syndrome, prostatitis, irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, endometriosis, etc.) can, in actuality, be manifestations of pelvic floor hyper-contractility and over-tensioning.

Pelvic floor physical therapy has become and will continue to be increasingly in vogue. This specialized branch of physical therapy that deals with pelvic floor issues treats a wide range of pelvic floor dysfunctions ranging the gamut from pelvic muscle weakness to pelvic muscle over-tensioning. Pelvic floor physical therapy sessions can be of great help for those with pelvic floor dysfunctions and it is clear that patients do better with supervised regimens than they do without. Pelvic physical therapy is particularly useful for pelvic pain syndromes. In France, the government subsidizes the cost of post-partum pelvic training (“La rééducation périnéale après accouchement”), including up to 20 sessions of pelvic PT intended to tone and “re-educate” the postnatal pelvic muscles.

The final piece of the pelvic revolution is the broadening appreciation that pelvic floor muscle training in males is no less important than in females, potentially beneficial in the management of stress urinary incontinence that follows prostatectomy, overactive bladder, post-void dribbling, erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and pelvic pain due to pelvic muscle spasm.

Future Considerations

Demand for the management of pelvic floor disorders will increase over the next decade. There is major growth opportunity for services that utilize non-physician providers (nurse practitioners, physician assistants and physical therapists) to teach patients pelvic muscle training and other behavioral treatments.

If Arnold Kegel were alive today, in all likelihood he would take great pleasure and pride in the breath of life being infused into his seminal work following decades of dormancy. His legacy and the fertile ground and transformative changes nurtured by his pioneering efforts will result in the continued empowerment of patients, with improvement in their pelvic health and quality of life.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– newly available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo (paperback edition will be available May 2016).

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health and Promiscuous Eating: Understanding Our Self-Destructive Relationship With Food   

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women.   Use code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

 

Sleep Apnea: Bad For Your Health (General, Sexual & Urinary)

February 6, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD   2/6/16

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(Thank you Pixabay for image)

This is an important topic, an issue that the medical community is just getting wind of (pardon the pun) with respect to how common a problem it is and how significant its consequences are. Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) negatively affects all aspects of health, including sexual and urinary function. Many patients with OSA present with urological symptoms that are not genital/urinary in origin, their root cause being the OSA.  When the OSA is treated, the urological symptoms improve dramatically. 

Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a chronic medical disorder that adversely affects one’s sleep, health and quality of life. It is characterized by repeated complete or partial interruptions of breathing during sleep due to mechanical obstruction of the upper airway passage. Muscle relaxation during sleeping—including those muscles that support the tongue and throat—results in the soft tissues in the throat sagging and collapsing under the force of gravity, pulling the airway closed and causing intermittent suffocation. This reduces or halts breathing and causes below-normal levels of oxygen in the blood, giving rise to insomnia and restless sleep with frequent awakenings. OSA sufferers wake up fatigued and have excessive daytime sleepiness, which correlates with an increased chance of motor vehicle accidents, “fatigue” eating and sleep deprivation-related cognitive impairment and mood disturbances.

OSA is present in about 25% of men and 10% of women in the USA. It is more prevalent with aging and with obesity.  Snoring in a loud and exaggerated fashion is typical, and snorting and gasping for air is characteristic. Other manifestations of OSA are a dry mouth and throat and abnormal daytime breathing patterns–particularly loud, shallow mouth breathing. It is not uncommon for those with OSA to have anatomical irregularities, including a thick neck, enlarged tonsils and palate and jaw abnormalities.

Obesity and OSA share much in common, both chronic diseases that give rise to serious medical issues affecting quantity and quality of life. OSA results in hypoxia (lack of oxygen supply), an unhealthy state since every cell, tissue and organ in our body depends upon oxygen to fuel proper function. A spectrum of serious medical issues can result, including headache, impaired glucose metabolism/type 2 diabetes, depression, chronic kidney disease, peripheral neuropathy, glaucoma and cardiovascular disease. OSA is detrimental to endothelial cell function, the specialized cells that line arteries, and OSA-related cardiovascular disease includes high blood pressure, heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, arrhythmia and atrial fibrillation. OSA increases the risk of premature mortality.

OSA is associated with urological issues including decreased sex drive, low testosterone levels, sexual dysfunction in both men and women, overactive bladder and frequent nighttime urinating (a.k.a. nocturia).

OSA and Urination

Many with OSA have urinary symptoms because of the OSA and not because of problems with their bladder, prostate, kidneys, etc. They often end up in a urologist’s office because their primary symptoms are urinary. The two most prevalent urinary issues associated with OSA are nighttime urination and overactive bladder.

Nocturnal urine production by the kidneys is based upon many factors including fluid intake as well as the production of certain hormones. The two key hormones involved are anti-diuretic hormone (ADH) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). ADH is a pituitary hormone that regulates water excretion by the kidney, restricting urine production so that humans maintain their blood volume. ANP is the opposite—a diuretic that increases water excretion by the kidney, causing abundant urine production, as well as inhibiting ADH.

Here is what happens with OSA: Vigorous efforts to breathe against an obstructed airway result in negative pressures in the chest. This increases the volume of venous blood that returns to the heart, causing distension of the right heart chambers (atrium and ventricle). The heart responds to this distension as a false sign of fluid volume overload, with a hormonal response of secreting ANP. As a result of the ANP secretion, high volumes of urine are produced during sleep, resulting in sleep-disruptive nocturia. There may be as many as 6 or more nighttime awakenings to urinate. When OSA is treated it results in a significant improvement, if not complete resolution, of the sleep disruptive nocturia.

In contrast to nocturia, overactive bladder is more of a daytime issue. Its symptoms include the sudden and urgent desire to urinate (a.k.a. “gotta go”), urinating frequently, and possibly urinary leakage (urgency urinary incontinence). The cardinal symptom of OAB is urgency, the sudden and compelling desire to urinate that is difficult to postpone. Studies have shown a direct relationship between the severity of OSA and the severity of OAB symptoms.

 OSA and Sex

Sexual issues are common among men and women with OSA. Men typically experience a loss of interest in sex, low testosterone and difficulties obtaining and maintaining erections.  Women can experience a loss in sex drive and other symptoms of female sexual dysfunction.  Neurological testing of patients with OSA-related erectile dysfunction has shown an absent or impaired bulbo-cavernosus reflex, which is a measure of pelvic floor muscle response to sexual stimulation. The extent of impairment is directly proportional to the severity of the OSA. Essentially, this is peripheral neuropathy—nerve damage that negatively affects sexual function.

 Diagnosing OSA

Despite growing awareness of OSA, 90% of those with the disorder are undiagnosed and untreated. The diagnosis is made with overnight sleep studies, performed under the care of a pulmonologist, an internist who specializes in lung problems. This study records sleep stages, heart rhythm, leg movements, breathing patterns and oxygen saturations. OSA is defined as a complete cessation of airflow lasting more than 10 seconds (apneic episodes). The degree of OSA is based upon the number of episodes per hour of breathing cessation:

  • Mild OSA: 5-15 apneic episodes per hour
  • Moderate OSA: 15-30 apneic episodes per hour
  • Severe OSA: more than 30 apneic episodes per hour

As an alternative to overnight sleep studies that require an overnight stay in a sleep lab, home sleep testing machines are now available.

Treating OSA

Since many with OSA carry the burden of extra pounds–which contributes in a major way to the problem–the first-line treatment is lifestyle improvement. This includes healthy eating, weight loss, exercise, smoking cessation, etc. Additionally, alcohol and other sedative medications (that can further interfere with breathing) should be avoided. Positional therapy–avoiding the supine position and instead sleeping upright–can be helpful as well.

Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the most common and effective treatment for OSA and is considered the gold standard. This is an apparatus that maintains the airway and airflow, preventing apnea and the negative consequences of lack of oxygen. The problem with CPAP is that it is a somewhat cumbersome device that some people tolerate poorly. Alternatively, oral appliances that are fitted by a dentist can be effective, are less cumbersome than CPAP and do not require an electrical source. A procedure under investigation is the implantation of a hypoglossus nerve stimulators, which can help prevent some of the involved muscles from sagging and causing obstruction. On occasion, surgery such as uvulo-palato-pharyngoplasty performed by an ear/nose/throat surgeon is needed to help alleviate the obstructed breathing passage.

Bottom Line: OSA causes reduced levels of oxygen in the blood and therefore diminished oxygen supply to all cells in the body. Oxygen is vital for cellular function, and similar to the mechanical choking of one’s neck from OSA, so the cells, tissues and organs of the body “choke” in response to insufficient oxygen. The symptoms of OSA are due to the collateral damage from this lack of oxygen with impaired nerve and blood vessel function being particularly detrimental. Many urological issues can develop as a result of OSA, including sleep-disruptive nighttime urination, overactive bladder and altered sexual function. Fortunately, OSA is a treatable condition.

A shout-out to my friend and dentist extraordinaire who has expertise on OSA and the use of oral appliances:  Warren Boardman, DDS, Bergen County Center for Snoring, Sleep Apnea & CPAP Intolerance, 75 Chestnut Street, Ridgewood, NJ, 07450, 201-445-4808

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.