Posts Tagged ‘holistic approach’

Men’s Health: Holistic Urology Approach

August 19, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   8/19/17

pixabay

Thank you, Pixabay, for image above

Men Don’t Ask For Directions, Etc…

With respect to their health, women are usually adept at preventive care and commonly see an internist or gynecologist regularly.  On the other hand, men—who could certainly take a lesson from the fairer sex—are generally not good at seeing doctors for routine checkups. Not only has our culture indoctrinated in men the philosophy of “playing through pain,” but also the lack of necessity of seeking medical care when not having a specific problem or pain (and even when men do develop dangerous health warning signs, many choose to ignore them.). Consequently, many men have missed out on some vital opportunities: To be screened for risks that can lead to future medical issues; be diagnosed with problems that cause no symptoms (such as high blood pressure, glaucoma and prostate cancer); and counseled regarding means of modifying risk factors and optimizing health.

Many Men Don’t Have A Doc

Urologists evaluate and treat a large roster of male patients, a surprising number of whom have not sought healthcare elsewhere and do not have a primary physician. Urological visits offer an opportunity to not only focus on the specific urological complaint that drives the visit (usually urinary or sexual problems), but also to take a more encompassing holistic health approach, emphasizing modifications in diet, physical activity, and other lifestyle factors that can prevent many untoward consequences and maximize health. By getting men engaged in the healthcare system on a timely basis, they can be helped to minimize those risk factors that typically cause the illnesses that afflict men as they age.

Identifying and modifying risk factors can mitigate, if not prevent, a number of common maladies.  Modifiable risk factors for the primary killer of men—cardiovascular disease—include poor diet, obesity, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol, tobacco consumption, stress, high blood pressure, high blood glucose and diabetes, high cholesterol, obstructive sleep apnea, low testosterone and depression. The bottom line is that every patient contact provides an opportunity for so much more than merely treating the sexual or urinary complaint that brought the patient into the office. Furthermore, many systemic disease processes—including diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular diseases, etc.—have urological manifestations and symptoms that can be identified by the urologist who in turn can make a referral to the appropriate health care provider.

Erections are an Indicator of Health

Many men may not cherish seeing doctors on a routine basis, but a tipping point occurs when it comes to their penises not functioning!  Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common reason for men to “bite the bullet” and call their friendly urologist for a consultation. The holistic approach by the consultant urologist is to not only manage the ED, but to diagnose the underlying risk factors that can be a sign of broader health issues than simply poor quality erections. Importantly, ED can be a warning sign of an underlying medical problem, since the quality of erections serves as a barometer of cardiovascular health.

    “A man with ED and no known cardiovascular disease                                                                      is a cardiac patient until proven otherwise.”

Graham Jackson, M.D., cardiologist from the U.K.

Since the penile arteries are small in diameter and the coronary (heart) arteries larger, it stands to reason that if vascular disease—generally a systemic process that is diffuse and not localized—is affecting the tiny penile arteries, it may affect the larger coronary arteries as well, if not now, then at some time in the future. In other words, the fatty deposits that compromise blood flow to the smaller vessels of the penis may also do so to the larger vessels of the heart and thus ED may be considered a “stress test.” In fact, the presence of ED is as much of a predictor of cardiovascular disease as is a strong family history of cardiac problems, tobacco smoking, or elevated cholesterol.

Dr. Jackson cleverly expanded the initials ED to mean: Endothelial dysfunction (endothelial cells line the insides of arteries); early detection (of heart disease); and early death (if missed). For this reason, men with ED should undergo a medical evaluation seeking arterial disease elsewhere in the body (heart, brain, aorta, and peripheral blood vessels).

Urologists have a broad network of colleagues (including internists, cardiologists, pulmonologists, gastroenterologists, medical oncologists, radiologists, radiation oncologists, general surgeons, etc.) that can be collaborated with and to whom patients can be referred to if and when their expertise is needed.

Urine is Golden

Of all the bodily secretions that humans produce, urine uniquely provides one of the best “tells” regarding health.  A simple and inexpensive urinary dipstick can diagnose diabetes, kidney disease, urinary tract infection, the presence of blood and hydration status, in a matter of moments.

What a dipstick can reveal:

specific gravity… hydration status

pH…acidity of urine

leukocytes…urinary infection

blood…many urological disorders including kidney and bladder cancer

nitrite…urinary infection

bilirubin…a yellow pigment found in bile, a substance made by the liver; its presence may be indicative of jaundice

protein…kidney disease

glucose…diabetes

Case report of a recent patient

54-year-old male with six-month history of frequent daytime urination as well as awakening 3-4 times during sleep hours to urinate. Additionally, he has difficulty maintaining erections and premature ejaculation. Physical examination of the abdomen, genitalia and prostate was unremarkable. Urinalysis showed large glucose. Lab studies showed glucose 204 (normally < 100); HbA1c 10.6% (normally < 5.6); testosterone 202 (normally > 300) and PSA 4.2 (elevated for his age). 

He was referred to an internist for management of diabetes that manifested with urinary frequency, elevated urine and blood glucose and elevated HbA1c (a measure of blood glucose levels over the past 6 weeks).  With appropriate management of the diabetes, the urinary frequency resolved. Because of the PSA elevation he is scheduled for an MRI of the prostate, and because of the low testosterone, he is undergoing additional endocrine testing to see if the problem is testicular or pituitary in origin and certainly will be a candidate for medical therapy if improved lifestyle measures fail to sufficiently elevate the testosterone.

Bottom Line: Preventive and proactive care—as many pursue regularly for their prized automobiles (e.g., lubrication and oil changes, replacing worn belts before they snap while on the road, etc.)—provides numerous advantages.  The same strategy should be applied to the human machine!  Since contact with a urologist may be a man’s only connection with the healthcare system, a vital opportunity exists for the urologist to offer holistic care in addition to specialty genital and urinary care.  The goal is to empower men by getting them invested in their own health in order to minimize disease risk and optimize vitality. 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

 

Advertisements