Posts Tagged ‘ejaculation’

Bloody Semen: Frightening, But Usually Not To Worry

September 2, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  9/2/17

Hematospermia is medical speak for a bloody ejaculation. It is a not uncommon occurrence, usually resulting from inflammation of one of the male reproductive parts, typically the prostate or seminal vesicles.  As scary as it is, it is rarely indicative of a serious underlying disorder.  Like a nosebleed, it can be due simply to a ruptured blood vessel. It is almost always benign and self-limited,  typically resolving within several weeks. On occasion it may become recurrent or chronic, causing concern and anxiety, but again, rarely due to a serious problem.

Factoid: The most common cause of a bloody ejaculation is following a prostate biopsy.

 

Illu_repdt_male

Thank you, Wikipedia, for image above, public domain

What is semen?

Semen is a nutrient vehicle for sperm that is a concoction of secretions from the testes, epididymis, urethral glands, prostate gland, and seminal vesicles.  The clear secretions from the urethral glands account for a tiny component, the milky white prostate gland secretions for a small amount of the fluid, and the viscous secretions from the seminal vesicles for the bulk of the semen. Sperm makes up only a minimal contribution.

Factoid:  After vasectomy the semen appears no different since sperm make up a negligible portion of the total seminal volume.

What exactly occurs during ejaculation?

After a sufficient level of sexual stimulation is achieved (the “ejaculatory threshold”), secretions from the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, epididymis, and vas deferens are deposited into the part of the urethra within the prostate gland.  Shortly thereafter, the bladder neck pinches closed while the prostate and seminal vesicles contract and the pelvic floor muscles spasm rhythmically, sending wave-like contractions rippling down the urethra to propel the semen out.

Factoid:  Ejaculation is an event that takes place in the penis; orgasm occurs in the brain.

Factoid: It is the pelvic floor muscles that are the muscle power behind ejaculation.  Remember this: strong pelvic muscles = strong ejaculation.

Since the prostate and seminal vesicles contribute most of the volume of the semen, bleeding, inflammation or other pathology of these organs is usually responsible for bloody ejaculations. The bleeding may cause blood in the initial, middle, or terminal portions of the ejaculate.  Typically, blood arising from the prostate occurs in the initial portion, whereas blood arising from the seminal vesicles occurs later. The color of the semen can vary from bright red, indicative of recent or active bleeding, to a rust or brown color, indicative of old bleeding.

What are some of the causes of blood in the semen?

  • Infection or inflammation (urethritis, epididymitis, orchitis, prostatitis, seminal vesiculitis, etc.)
  • Ruptured blood vessel, often from intense sexual activity
  • Reproductive organ cysts or stones
  • Following prostate biopsy (from numerous needle punctures); following vasectomy
  • Pelvic trauma
  • Rarely malignancy, most commonly prostate cancer and less commonly, urethral cancer
  • Coagulation issues or use of blood thinners

 How is hematospermia evaluated and treated?

A brief history reveals how long the problem has been ongoing, the number of episodes, the appearance of the semen and the presence of any inciting factors and associated urinary or sexual symptoms. Physical examination involves examination of the genitals and a digital rectal examination to check the size and consistency of the prostate. Laboratory evaluation is a urinalysis to check for urinary infection and blood in the urine, and a PSA (prostate specific antigen) blood test.  At times a urine culture and/or semen culture needs to be done.

Hematospermia is typically managed with a course of oral antibiotics because of the infection/inflammation that is often the underlying cause.  In most cases, the situation resolves rapidly.

If the bloody ejaculations continue, further workup is required.  This may involve imaging with either trans-rectal ultrasonography (TRUS) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and at times, cystoscopy. TRUS is an office procedure in which the prostate and seminal vesicles are imaged by placing an ultrasound probe in the rectum. MRI imaging is performed at an imaging center under the supervision of a radiologist. The MRI provides a more thorough diagnostic evaluation, but is more expensive and time consuming.  Both TRUS and MRI can show dilated seminal vesicles, cysts of the ejaculatory ducts, prostate or other reproductive organs, and ejaculatory or seminal vesicle stones.  MRI can also show sites suspicious for prostate cancer. Cystoscopy is a visual inspection of the inner lining of the urethra, prostate and bladder with a small-caliber, flexible instrument. Treatment is based on the findings of the imaging and diagnostic studies, but again, it is important to emphasize the typical benign and self-limited nature of hematospermia.

Bottom Line: Blood in the ejaculation is not uncommon and is frightening, but is usually benign and self-limited and easily treated. In the rare situation where it persists, it can be thoroughly evaluated to assess the underlying cause.  If you experience hematospermia, visit your friendly urologist to have it checked out.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

The aforementioned books will teach men and women, respectively, how to strengthen their pelvic floor muscles.

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Ejaculation: His and Hers

March 12, 2016

Andrew Siegel, MD   3/12/2016

One of the advantages of the specialty of urology is that it encompasses patients of both genders, unlike gynecology, which strictly involves females. Since I am board certified in Urology as well as in Female Pelvic Medicine, my practice allows me to have an equal balance of male and female patients. This gives me the opportunity to appreciate comparative male and female pelvic anatomy and function, which in reality are remarkably similar–a fact that may surprise you.

 A Few Brief Words on the Embryology of the Genitals.

Who Knew? Female and male external genitals are remarkably similar. In fact, in the first few weeks of existence as an embryo, the external genitals are identical.

The female external genitals are the “default” model, which will remain female in the absence of the male hormone testosterone. In this circumstance, the genital tubercle (a midline swelling) becomes the clitoris; the urogenital folds (two vertically-oriented folds of tissue below the genital tubercle) become the labia minora (inner lips); and the labio-scrotal swellings (two vertically-oriented bulges outside the urogenital folds) fuse to become the labia majora (outer lips).

Gray1119

(Comparison of genital anatomy,  1918 Gray’s Anatomy, Dr. Henry Gray, public domain)

In the presence of testosterone, the genital tubercle morphs into the penis; the urogenital folds fuse and become the urethra and part of the shaft of the penis; and the labio-scrotal swellings fuse to become the scrotal sac.  So, the clitoris and the penis are essentially the same structure, as are the outer labia and the scrotum.                                                                                              

Ejaculation

Ejaculation is the expulsion of fluids at the time of sexual climax. The word “ejaculation” derives from ex, meaning out and jaculari, meaning to throw, shoot, hurl, cast. We are all familiar with male ejaculation, an event that is obvious and well understood and well studied. However, female ejaculation is a mysterious phenomenon and a curiosity to many and remains poorly understood and studied.

Male Ejaculation

Men often “dribble” before they “shoot.” The bulbo-urethral glands, a.k.a. Cowper’s glands, are paired, pea-sized structures whose ducts drain into the urethra (urinary channel). During sexual arousal, these glands produce a sticky, clear fluid that provides lubrication to the urethra. (These glands are the male versions of Bartholin’s glands in the female, discussed below).

Once a threshold of sexual stimulation is surpassed, men reach the “point of no return,” in which ejaculation becomes inevitable. Secretions from the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, epididymis, and vas deferens are deposited into the urethra within the prostate gland. Shortly thereafter, the bladder neck pinches closed while the prostate and seminal vesicles contract and the pelvic floor muscles (the bulbocavernosus and ischiocavernosus) spasm rhythmically, sending wave-like contractions rippling down the urethra to forcibly propel the semen out in a pulsatile and explosive eruption. Ejaculation is the physical act of expulsion of the semen, whereas orgasm is the intense emotional excitement and climax, the blissful emotions that accompany ejaculation.

Male_anatomy

(Male Internal Sexual Anatomy, permission CC BY-SA 3.0, created 18 April 2009)

What’s in the Ejaculate?

Less than 5% of the volume is sperm and the other 95+% is a cocktail of genital secretions that provides nourishment, support and chemical safekeeping for sperm. About 70% of the volume comes from the seminal vesicles, which secrete a thick, viscous fluid and 25% from the prostate gland, which produces a milky-white fluid. A negligible amount is from the bulbo-urethral glands, which release a clear viscous fluid that has a lubrication function. The average ejaculate volume is 2-5 milliliters (one teaspoon is the equivalent of 5 milliliters).

Who Knew?  While a huge ejaculatory load sounds desirable, in reality it is correlated with having fertility issues. The sperm can literally “drown” in the excess seminal fluid.

Female Ejaculation

This is a much less familiar subject than male ejaculation and a curiosity to many. Only a small percentage of women are capable of expelling fluid at the time of sexual climax.

The nature of this fluid is controversial, thought by some to be excessive vaginal lubrication and others to be glandular secretions. Although the volume of ejaculated fluid is typically small, there are certain women who ejaculate very large volumes of fluid at climax. Expulsion of fluid at climax may come from four possible sources: vaginal secretions; Bartholin’s glands; Skene’s glands; and the urinary bladder.

Skenes_gland

(Skene’s and Bartholin’s Glands, created 22 January 2007, original uploader Nicholasolan  en.wikipedia, Permission: CC-BY-SA-2.5, 2.0, 1.0; GFDL-WITH-DISCLAIMERS; CC-BY-S)

During female arousal and sexual stimulation, the vaginal walls lubricate with a “sweating-like” reaction as a result of the increased blood flow to the genitals and pelvic blood congestion, creating a slippery and glistening film. The amount of this lubrication is highly variable. Some women with female ejaculation can release some of this fluid at the time of climax by virtue of powerful contractions of the vaginal and pelvic floor muscles.

Bartholin’s glands are paired, pea-size glands that drain just below and to each side of the vaginal opening. They are the female versions of the male bulbo-urethral glands and during sexual arousal they secrete small drops of fluid, resulting in moistening of the opening of the vagina.

Skene’s glands (para-urethral glands) are paired glands that drain just above and to each side of the urethral opening. They are the female homologue of the male prostate gland and secrete fluid with arousal.

Scientific studies have shown that those women who are capable of ejaculating very large volumes are actually having urinary incontinence due to an involuntary contraction of the urinary bladder that accompanies orgasm. This is often referred to as “squirting.”

Bottom Line: In the animal kingdom (including human beings), sex is a clever “bait and switch” scheme. In the seeming pursuit of a feel-good activity, in reality—determined by nature’s evolutionary sleight of hand—participants are hoodwinked into reproducing. The ultimate goal of the reproductive process is the fusion of genetic material from two individuals to perpetuate the species.

The penis functions as a “pistol” to place DNA deeply into the female’s reproductive tract with ejaculation a necessity for the process. Similarly, the female genitals need to be sufficiently lubricated to optimize this process and the combination of vaginal lubrication from enhanced blood flow contributed to by Skene’s and Bartholin’s secretions will optimize nature’s ultimate goal.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx, comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store that is home to quality urology products for men and women.  Use code UROLOGY10 at check out for 10% discount. 

 

 

 

 

When Ejac-“elation” Becomes Ejac-“frustration”

February 13, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD  2/13/2016

800px-Fireworks4_amk

(Fireworks, 8/2007, author AngMoKio)

In the arena of male sexual dysfunction (MSD), ejaculation problems play second fiddle to erectile dysfunction (ED). Today’s entry explores common issues with ejaculation other than premature ejaculation, which I have previously addressed: https://healthdoc13.wordpress.com/tag/premature-ejaculation/

What my patients tell me: 

“It takes me too long.”

 “I can’t ejaculate.”

 “It happens, but not much fluid comes out.”

 “It just dribbles out with no force.”

 “I barely know that it happened; I just don’t get the same feeling that I used to.”

One would think that MSD is the same as ED, which seems to get all the press. However, MSD is more complex and all-encompassing than having soft or short-lived erections, which is just one aspect of MSD. Sex drive (libido) is an important part of the picture. Ejaculation is another vital component. With regard to ejaculatory issues, premature ejaculation (rapidly achieving climax) gets all the attention. However, there are other ejaculatory issues that contribute in a major way to MSD.

The processes of having an erection and ejaculating are separate, even though they usually occur at the same time. However, it is possible to have a rock-hard erection and be unable to ejaculate, and conversely, to ejaculate with a limp penis. Regardless, it sure is nice when the two processes harmonize. All things being equal, with a good quality erection, ejaculation will be more satisfying.

Why is ejaculation better with a rigid erection than without?

The urethra (tube within the penis that conducts semen) is the “barrel” of the penile “rifle.” It is surrounded by spongy erectile tissue called the corpora spongiosum (“spongy body”) which constricts and pressurizes the “barrel” to optimize ejaculation and promote the forceful expulsion of semen, the “ammo.” The word ejaculation derives from ex, meaning out + jaculari, meaning to throw, shoot, hurl, cast for a good reason!

Additionally, the pelvic floor muscles play a key role in the process of ejaculation. The bulbocavernosus (BC) is a compressor muscle that surrounds the spongy body and at the time of ejaculation it contracts rhythmically, sending wave-like pulsations rippling down the urethra to forcibly propel the semen in an explosive eruption, providing the horsepower for forceful ejaculation. This BC muscle engages when you have an erection and becomes maximally active at the time of ejaculation.

Issues with ejaculation are extremely common complaints among middle-aged and older men. These are often bothersome and distressing, and include the following:

  • Delayed ejaculation
  • Absent ejaculation
  • Skimpy ejaculation volume
  • Weak ejaculation force and arc
  • Diminished ejaculatory sensation

Ejaculatory problems often correlate with aging, weight gain, the presence of lower urinary tract symptoms and ED. The older you are, the heavier you are, the more that you are having problems with urination and obtaining/maintaining an erection, the greater the likelihood that you will also have ejaculatory problems. This is often on the basis of an age-related decline of sensory nerve function as well as weakened pelvic floor muscles. Additionally, aging reproductive glands produce less fluid and the ducts that drain genital fluids can obstruct. Furthermore, medications that are used to treat prostate enlargement can profoundly affect ejaculatory volume.

So What’s The Big Deal Anyway?

Most men do not appreciate meager, lackadaisical-quality ejaculations and orgasms. Sex is important and getting a rigid erection is vital, but the culmination—ejaculation and orgasm—is equally important. We may be 40, 50, 60 years old or older, but we still want to point and shoot like we did when we were 20 and desire to retain that intensely pleasurable feeling of yesteryear.

Delayed Ejaculation

I have previously addressed this topic:

https://healthdoc13.wordpress.com/2015/02/21/im-almost-there-what-you-need-to-know-about-delayed-ejaculation/

Absent Ejaculation

This is part of the spectrum of delayed ejaculation, except in this instance, climax is never achieved. Alternatively, it happens with surgical removal of the reproductive organs, as occurs with radical prostatectomy or radical cystectomy for prostate and bladder cancer, respectively.  It can also occur in the presence of  neuropathy, e.g., with diabetes and other neurological disorders. In these circumstances, orgasm can still be experienced, although ejaculation is absent.

Skimpy Ejaculation Volume

This is very common with aging as the reproductive organs “dry out” to some extent. It also happens with certain medications that either reduce reproductive gland secretions (Proscar, Avodart) or cause some of the ejaculate to go backwards into the urinary bladder (Flomax, Rapaflo, Uroxatral).

Weak Ejaculation Force, Arc and Sensation

What was once an intense climax with a substantial volume of semen that could be forcefully ejaculated in a arc several feet in length gives way to a lackluster experience with a small volume of semen weakly dribbled out the penis.  These issues clearly correlate with aging, weakened pelvic floor muscles and ED.

Bottom Line: In addition to sex drive issues, erectile dysfunction and premature ejaculation, there are a spectrum of other male sexual problems that are bothersome and distressing.  With aging, weight gain and weakening of the pelvic floor muscles, ejaculation and orgasm often become less spirited, with diminished volume, force and trajectory. However, there are solutions!

 To Optimize Ejaculation:

  1. Maintain a healthy lifestyle: good eating habits, healthy weight, engage in exercise, obtain adequate sleep, consume alcohol in moderation, avoid tobacco and minimize stress.
  1. Pelvic floor muscle training: Whereas a weakened BC muscle may result in semen dribbling with diminished force or trajectory, a strong BC can generate powerful contractions to forcibly ejaculate semen. Keep the BC and the other pelvic floor muscles fit through pelvic floor muscle exercises.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

What To Expect of Your Erections As You Age…20’s, 30’s, 40’s and Beyond

December 26, 2015

Andrew Siegel,  MD  12/26/15

I have written more than 250 blogs, this being the overwhelming most popular one with 50,000 plus views in 2015.  I am therefore reposting this as an encore final entry of 2015. 

shutterstock_side view manjpeg

It is shocking how ill prepared we are for aging. Nobody informs us exactly what to expect with the process, so we just sit back and observe the changes as they unfold, dealing with them as best we can. Although educational books are available on many topics regarding other expected experiences, such as “What To Expect When You’re Expecting,” I have yet to see “The Manual of Man,” explaining the changes we might expect to experience as time goes on. Some day I wish to author a book like that, but for the time being I will blog on what to anticipate with male sexual function as time relentlessly marches on.

“But the wheel of time turns, inexorably. True rigidity becomes a distant memory; the refractory period of sexual indifference after climax increases; the days of coming are going. Sexually speaking, men drop out by the wayside. By 65, half of all men are, to use a sporting metaphor, out of the game; as are virtually all ten years later, without resort to chemical kick-starting.”

Tom Hickman, God’s Doodle: The Life and Times of the Penis

Aging can be unkind and Father Time does not spare your sexual function. Although erectile dysfunction (ED) is not inevitable, with each passing decade, there is an increasing prevalence of it. Present in some form in 40% of men by age 40 years, for each decade thereafter an additional 10% join the ED club. All aspects of sexuality decline, although libido (sexual interest and drive) suffers the least depreciation, leading to a swarm of men with eager “big heads” and apathetic “little heads,” a most frustrating combination indeed.

With aging often comes less sexual activity, and with less sexual activity often comes disuse atrophy, in which the penis actually becomes smaller. Additionally, with aging there is often weight gain, and with weight gain comes a generous fat distribution in the pubic area, which will make the penis appear shorter. With aging also comes scrotal laxity and testicles that hang down loosely, like the pendulous breasts of an older woman. Many of my older patients relate that when they sit on the toilet, their scrotum touches the toilet water. So, the penis shrinks and the testicles hang low like those of an old hound dog…Time and gravity can be cruel conspirators!

So, what can you expect of your sexual function as you age? I have broken this down by decade with the understanding that these are general trends and that you as an individual may well vary quite a bit from others in your age group, depending upon your genetics, lifestyle, luck and other factors. There are 30-year-old men who have sexual issues and 80-year-old men who are veritable “studs,” so age per se is not the ultimate factor.

You may wonder about the means by which I was able to craft this guide. I was able to do so through more than 25 years spent deep in the urology trenches, working the front line with thousands of patient interactions. My patients have been among my most important teachers and have given me a wealth of information that is not to be found in medical textbooks or journals, nor taught in medical school or during urology residency. Furthermore, I am a 50-something year-old man, keenly observant of the subtle changes that I have personally witnessed, but must report that I am still holding my own!

Age 18-30: Your sexual appetite is prodigious and sex often occupies the front burners of your mind. It requires very little stimulation to achieve an erection—even the wind blowing the right way might just be enough to stimulate a rigid, gravity-defying erection, pointing proudly at the heavens. The sight of an attractive woman, the smell of her perfume, merely the thought of her can arouse you fully. You get erections even when you don’t want them…if there was only a way to bank these for later in life!  You wake up in the middle of the night sporting a rigid erection. When you climax, the orgasm is intense and you are capable of ejaculating an impressive volume of semen forcefully with an arc-like trajectory, a virtual comet shooting across the horizon. When you arise in the morning from sleep, it is not just you that has arisen, but also your penis that has become erect in reflex response to your full bladder, which can make emptying your bladder quite the challenge, with the penis pointing up when you want to direct its aim down towards the toilet bowl.

It doesn’t get better than this…you are an invincible king… a professional athlete at the peak of his career! All right, maybe not invincible…you do have an Achilles heel…you may sometimes ejaculate prematurely because you are so hyper-excitable and sometimes in a new sexual situation you have performance anxiety, a mechanical failure brought on by the formidable mind-body correction, your all-powerful mind dooming the capabilities of your perfectly normal genital plumbing.

Age 30-40: Things start to change ever so slowly, perhaps even so gradually that you barely even notice them. Your sex drive remains vigorous, but it is not quite as obsessive and all consuming as it once was. You can still get quality erections, but they may not occur as spontaneously, as frequently and with such little provocation as they did in the past. You may require some touch stimulation to develop full rigidity. You still wake up in the middle of the night with an erection and experience “morning wood.” Ejaculations and orgasms are hardy, but you may notice some subtle differences, with your “rifle” being a little less powerful and of smaller caliber. The time it takes to achieve another erection after ejaculating increases. You are that athlete in the twilight of his career, seasoned and experienced, and the premature ejaculation of yonder years is much less frequent an occurrence.

Age 40-50: After age 40, changes become more obvious. You are still interested in sex, but not nearly with the passion you had two decades earlier. You can usually get a pretty good quality erection, but it now often requires tactile stimulation and the rock-star rigidity of years gone by gives way to a nicely firm penis, still suitable for penetration. The gravity-defying erections don’t have quite the angle they used to. At times you may lose the erection before the sexual act is completed. You notice that orgasms have lost some of their kick and ejaculation has become a bit feebler than previous. Getting a second erection after climax is not only difficult, but also may be something that you no longer have any interest in pursuing. All in all though, you still have some game left.

Age 50-60: Sex is still important to you and your desire is still there, but is typically diminished. Your erection can still be respectable and functional, but is not the majestic sight to behold that it once was, and touch is necessary for full arousal. Nighttime and morning erections become few and far between. The frequency of intercourse declines while the frequency of prematurely losing the erection before the sexual act is complete increases. Your orgasms are definitely different with less intensity of your climax, and at times, it feels like nothing much happened—more “firecracker” than “fireworks.” Ejaculation has become noticeably different—the volume of semen is diminished and you question why you are “drying up.” At ejaculation, the semen seems to dribble with less force and trajectory; your “high-caliber rifle” is now a “blunt-nosed handgun.” Getting a second erection after climax is difficult, and you have much more interest in going to sleep rather than pursuing a sexual encore. Sex is no longer a sport, but a recreational activity…sometimes just reserved for the weekends.

Age 60-70: “Sexagenarian” is bit of a misleading word…this is more apt a term for the 18-30 year-old group, because your sex life doesn’t compare to theirs…they are the athletes and you the spectators. Your testosterone level has plummeted over the decades, probably accounting for your diminished desire. Erections are still obtainable with some coaxing and coercion, but they are not five star erections, more like three stars, suitable for penetration, but not the flagpole of yonder years. They are less reliable, and at times your penis suffers with attention deficit disorder, unable to focus and losing its mojo prematurely, unable to complete the task at hand. Spontaneous erections, nighttime and early morning erections become rare occurrences. Climax is, well, not so climactic and explosive ejaculations are a matter of history. At times, you think you climaxed, but are unsure because the sensation was so un-sensational. Ejaculation may consist of a few drops of semen dribbling out of the end of the penis. Your “rifle” has now become a child’s plastic “water pistol.” Seconds?…thank you no …that is reserved for helpings on the dinner table! Sex is no longer a recreational activity, but an occasional amusement.

Age 70-80: When asked about his sexual function, my 70-something-year-old patient replied: “Retired…and I’m really upset that I’m not even upset.”

You may still have some remaining sexual desire left in you, but it’s a far cry from the fire in your groin you had when you were a younger man. With physical coaxing, your penis can at times be prodded to rise to the occasion, like a cobra responding to the beck and call of the flute of the snake charmer. The quality of your erections has noticeably dropped, with penile fullness without that rigidity that used to make penetration such a breeze. At times, the best that you can do is to obtain a partially inflated erection that cannot penetrate, despite pushing, shoving and manipulating every which way. Spontaneous erections have gone the way of the 8-track player. Thank goodness for your discovery that even a limp penis can be stimulated to orgasm, so it is still possible for you to experience sexual intimacy and climax, although the cli-“max” is more like a cli-“min.” That child’s “water pistol”…it’s barely got any water left in the chamber.

Age 80-90: You are now a member of a group that has an ever-increasing constituency—the ED club. Although you as an octogenarian may still be able to have sex, most of your brethren cannot; however, they remain appreciative that at least they still have their penises to use as spigots, allowing them to stand to urinate, a distinct competitive advantage over the womenfolk. (But even this plus is often compromised by the aging prostate gland, wrapped around the urinary channel like a boa constrictor, making urination a challenging chore.) Compounding the problem is that your spouse is no longer a spring chicken. Because she been post-menopausal for many years, she has a significantly reduced sex drive and vaginal dryness, making sex downright difficult, if not impossible. If you are able to have sex on your birthday and anniversary, you are doing much better than most. To quote one of my octogenarian patients in reference to his penis: “It’s like walking around with a dead fish.”

Age 90-100: To quote the comedian George Burns: “Sex at age 90 is like trying to shoot pool with a rope.” You are grateful to be alive and in the grand scheme of things, sex is low on the list of priorities. You can live vicariously through pleasant memories of your days of glory that are lodged deep in the recesses of your mind, as long as your memory holds out! Penis magic has gone the way of defeated phallus syndrome. So, when and if you get an erection, you never want to waste it!

Wishing you a healthy, peaceful, happy (and sexy) 2016,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. Coming soon is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

What’s Your Favorite Nerve?…How ‘Bout The Pudendal?

September 26, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD   9/26/15

13357-vintage-illustration-of-the-human-nervous-system-pv

(Image above is public domain illustration of the human nervous system)

We all have favorite colors (I’m partial to blue and green) and numbers (3 does it for me), but favorite nerves? Who has a favorite nerve? I submit that you have a favorite nerve, but just don’t know it!

There are many nerves within the human body and there are quite a few of vital importance. They do their jobs quietly, diligently, efficiently, behind the scenes. They are usually taken for granted and most of us have no awareness of them unless their function becomes impaired–as might happen when they become inflamed, traumatized, injured or diseased–giving rise to a host of neurological symptoms.

The system of nerves is essentially a massive network of “wires” that conduct and transmit electro-chemical impulses from the brain and spinal cord to and from every cell in the body. In order for nerves to work effectively, they need some “breathing room” so that they can function unimpeded.

We often become aware of our nerves when they are compressed, temporarily altering their function and giving rise to numbness, pins and needles sensation, etc. It happens to me when I sleep with my arms folded across my chest (ulnal nerve compression from arm flexion) causing me to wake up with a funny sensation involving the outside of my hand and pinky finger and the outer part of the ring finger. It occurs when I go out on a long bike ride, causing a tingly sensation in my right hand (ulnal and radial nerve compression from wrist hyperextension), despite wearing padded gloves. Similarly, I experience genital numbness (pudendal nerve compression from the bike seat), even though I wear padded bike shorts and have a fitted saddle. It also tends to happen when I sit for a lengthy period of time on the “porcelain throne” engaged with reading material, causing my lower legs and feet to “go to sleep” (sciatic nerve compression). Driving for a long period of time also irritates my sciatic nerve, causing an achy sensation in my butt, which runs down the back of my thigh, a good reason to periodically stretch out.

So What Is Your Favorite Nerve?

The cranial nerves are good candidates—those that derive directly from the brain and are responsible for sight, hearing, smell, balance, swallowing, smiling, etc. Most every medical school learns the following cranial nerve mnemonic: On Old Olympus Towering Tops, A Fin And German Viewed Some Hops— the first letter of each word representing the first letter of the 12 cranial nerves: Olfactory, Optic, Oculomotor, Trochlear, Trigeminal, Abducens, Facial, Auditory Vestibular Nerve, Glossopharyngeal, Vagus, Spinal Accessory, Hypoglossal. The 31 spinal nerves are certainly contenders as well—they originate directly from the spinal cord and provide sensation and the ability to use our muscles, indisputably key functions.

How About The Pudendal Nerve?

The pudendal nerve should be considered one of our dearest and fondest. It is the main nerve of the perineum—that valuable, but often unappreciated bit of human real estate located between the scrotum and the anus in the male and the vagina and the anus in the female. This nerve provides sensation to the penis and scrotum of the male and the clitoris, vulva and vagina of the female. In both males and females it provides sensation to the perineum and anal area and enables contraction of the pelvic floor muscles and voluntary continence muscles–the external urinary and anal sphincters. Its function is imperative for sexual arousal, clitoral and penile erection, ejaculation and orgasm.

Who Knew? The term pudendal derives from the Latin “pudenda,” meaning “the shameful parts.” Sadly, our culture has strong puritanical roots.

Who Knew? In the early 19th century, Benjamin Alcock, a prominent Irish anatomist, first described the existence of the pudendal nerve and the channel in which it travels, known as “Alcock’s canal.”  Alcock sure is a fitting name for the man who discovered the nerve responsible for penile sensation, ejaculation and orgasm!

The Human Sexual Response

In accordance with Masters and Johnson’s classic findings, the human sexual response can be can be distilled down to increased genital and pelvic blood flow (the primary reaction) and muscle tensioning (the secondary reaction). Orgasm is the release from the state of increased blood flow and tensioned muscles. It is pudendal nerve stimulation that initiates the process of increased genital/pelvic blood and pelvic muscle tensioning. At the time of orgasm the pudendal nerve is what drives the rhythmic contraction of the pelvic floor muscles.

With sexual stimulation of the genitals, sensory nerves that form the pudendal nerve relay to spinal cord centers, which reflexively relay the electrochemical message to increase genital and pelvic blood flow, resulting in female lubrication and clitoral engorgement and male penile erection. The nervous system also relays directly to sexual centers in the brain, including the hypothalamus, hippocampus, amygdala, thalamus, brainstem etc., enhancing this reflex response. Brain-induced erotic stimulation (visual cues, sounds, smells, touch, thoughts, memories, etc.) leads to further genital stimulation via excitatory pathways that descend down from the brain to the genitals.

The bulbo-cavernosus reflex (governed by sensory and motor branches of the pudendal nerve) is important in initiating and maintaining erection: with stimulation of the head of the penis or clitoris,  a reflex contraction of the pelvic floor muscles increases genital blood flow, enhancing penile rigidity and clitoral engorgement.

Bottom Line: Nerves are required for all body functions and some are indispensible. Although there are more important nerves than the pudendal nerve–such as the vagus nerve, which commands unconscious body processes such as heart rate and digestion–the pudendal nerve just might be your favorite! Without a functioning pudendal nerve, your genitals would be numb, sex would be impossible, your pelvic organs would hang unsupported and you would be diapered because of absent bladder and bowel control.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

Kegel Exercises To PREVENT Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

August 29, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD   8/29/15

shutterstock_v162886

“Prepare and prevent, not repair and repent.”

Restoring function of injured muscles is a well-established principle in sports medicine, orthopedics, plastic surgery and physical medicine and rehabilitation. The premise is simple: a traumatized or injured muscle is treated with rehab and training to accelerate tissue healing and restore working order. Many of the “baby boomers” demographic (age 51-69)—striving to retain their fitness and youth through exercise and “weekend warrior” activities that promote cardiac health but at the same time, musculoskeletal injuries—understand this concept well.

Dr. Arnold Kegel applied this principle to the female pelvic floor muscles to improve muscle strength and function in women after childbirth. Obstetrical “trauma” (9 months of pregnancy, tough labor and delivery of a 9 lb. baby) can cause pelvic floor dysfunction—urinary and bowel control issues, looseness of the vagina and its support tissues with descent of the bladder, uterus and rectum, and altered sexual function.

This principle has also been applied to men with pelvic floor muscle issues to improve urinary, bowel, erectile and ejaculatory health. Obviously, men do not suffer the acute pelvic floor muscle trauma of childbirth that women do, but they can develop pelvic floor muscle dysfunction from aging, weight gain, pelvic surgery (radical prostatectomy, colon surgery, etc.), a sedentary lifestyle, disuse atrophy, participation in saddle sports including cycling, etc.

An Ounce Of Prevention Is Worth A Pound Of Cure

Why not a radically different approach and instead of fixing pelvic floor dysfunction, try to prevent it? Unfortunately, we have a “reactive” oriented medical culture in the USA that does not emphasize prevention, but “repair.”  Another hurdle is that many people prefer having broken things fixed as opposed to making the effort to avoid breaking them in the first place.

So, if obstetrical trauma to the pelvic floor often brings on pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and its urinary, gynecological, bowel and sexual consequences, why not consider starting pelvic floor muscle training well before pregnancy, perhaps at the time of the first gynecological visit? And if aging, surgery and other factors contribute to male pelvic floor muscle dysfunction and its urinary, bowel and sexual consequences, why wait for the system to malfunction? Why not strengthen and tone the pelvic floor muscles when a man is young and healthy to prevent the predictable age-related decline?

Did You Know? The concept of pelvic floor muscle training BEFORE radical prostatectomy for treatment of prostate cancer is rapidly gaining traction and implementation. Instead of waiting to “rehab” the pelvic muscles after the fact, the concept is to “prehab” them. 

Many of us apply wellness principles through regular exercise—aerobic pursuits for cardiovascular health and strength training to maintain muscle tone, integrity and function—so why neglect the pelvic floor? We work out in the gym not only to achieve better fitness, but also to maintain fitness and prevent age-related losses in strength, flexibility, endurance, etc.

Preventive Pelvic Health Paradigm

Why passively accept the seemingly inevitable, when one can be proactive instead of reactive and can address the future problem before it becomes a problem? Why wait until function becomes dysfunction? Whether male or female, the new paradigm is preventive pelvic health. The goal is to avoid, delay, or minimize the decline in pelvic function that accompanies aging and that is accelerated by pelvic muscle trauma and injury, surgery, obesity and disuse atrophy.

Bottom Line: You have the ability to positively influence your health destiny. Instead of being reactive and waiting for your pelvic health to go south, be proactive to ensure your continuing urinary, bowel and sexual health. If you wait for the onset of a dysfunction to motivate you to action, it may possibly be too late. Think about integrating a preventive pelvic floor muscle program into your exercise regimen. Much like a vaccine, it will help to prevent a disease that you hopefully will never get.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: Available in e-book (Kindle, iBooks, Nook, Kobo) and paperback: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com.  In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Sexual, Pelvic and Urinary Health.

Co-founder of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program.  Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: http://www.PrivateGym.com or available on Amazon.

“Welcome To The Club”

June 20, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD 6/20/15

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(Thank you Pixabay for above image)

“Welcome to the club.” These four words have become my favorite response to a variety of the presenting complaints of my middle-age patients. As a fifty-something year-old male, I am a member of this club, the one in which things are not necessarily bad or problematic, but certainly different from the way they used to be.

I find that this sentence—gently stated in a heartening manner with a smile on my face—is calming and reassuring to my patients who are uncertain if they have a genuine medical issue that they might need to be concerned about. By being told that they are “members of the club,” they immediately understand that their complaint is not only common and shared by many of their peers, but also is to be expected and is not a major concern.

“Things fall apart, the center cannot hold.” –Chinua Achebe

Things change. We get older and we look and function differently…again, not necessarily badly, but differently. Unfortunately, humans do not come with a “user manual” that explains what to expect as we age, which could help us make the distinction between the normal expectations of aging as opposed to problems that demand medical attention. On my bucket list is to write such a “Manual of Man,” at least from a urology perspective, discussing the urinary, genital and sexual changes to be expected with the aging process. The challenge is to recognize the difference between “normal aging” and “pathological aging.”

On Becoming A Slack In The Sack

Sex Drive

After age 40, you are still interested in sex, but not nearly with the all-consuming passion you had decades before. Testosterone levels fall ever so gradually, resulting in this decrease in sexual appetite. That stated, libido seems to be the element of male sexuality that survives the longest, intact to some extent long after the penis functions only to allow you to stand to urinate. However, what was once a raging “fire” may now be mere “embers.”  It can be a source of great frustration to have functioning software but poorly functioning hardware!

Erections

You still may be able to get a respectable erection, but now it probably requires a bit more effort—often demanding touch for full arousal, whereas at one time it took only a smidgeon of erotic stimulation. Although the penis may be capable of getting hard enough for penetration, it has probably lost some of the rock-star majestic rigidity of yesteryear. Although the erection still can defy gravity, it might not have quite the angle it used to. On occasion the erection may soften before the sex act is completed. Nighttime and morning erections are fewer and farther between. Getting a second erection after climax is difficult, and you probably have more interest in going to sleep rather than pursuing a sexual encore.

Ejaculation and Orgasm

Ejaculation becomes noticeably different. The volume of semen is diminished and you question why you are “drying up.” Climax happens with less force and arc, sometimes just a mere dribble; your once “high-caliber rifle” is now a “blunt-nosed handgun.” Orgasms are unquestionably different with loss of some kick and intensity. At times, it may feel like nothing much happened—more “firecracker” than “fireworks.” Sperm quality also tends to go by the wayside with aging, but who really cares since procreation is for the next generation!

The penis often becomes less sensitive, not only making it more difficult to achieve and maintain an erection, but also at times giving rise to difficulty achieving climax, with delayed ejaculation. Perhaps this is an improvement over the premature ejaculation that may have been an issue when you were younger.

Changes In Genital Anatomy

Shrinkage

Not a day goes by in my urology practice when I don’t hear the words: “Doc, my penis is shrinking.” The truth of the matter is that the penis can shrink from a variety of circumstances, but most of the time it is a mere illusion—a sleight of penis. Weight gain causes a generous pubic fat pad—the male equivalent of the female mons pubis—making the penis appear shorter. However, penile length is usually intact, with the penis merely hiding behind the fat pad, what I call the “turtle effect.”

There are genuine reasons for penile shrinkage such as treatments for prostate cancer including radical prostatectomy and testosterone deprivation as well as “disuse atrophy,” penile “wasting” resulting from not using the penis as nature intended. Additionally, with aging there is often a fatty plaque buildup within the penile arteries, loss of erection chamber smooth muscle and elastic tissue (replaced with scar tissue) and weakening of the pelvic floor muscles. This results in less elastic and expansive erection chambers that do not fill up and trap blood properly.  It also causes a loss in penile length, girth and the ability to maintain the high penile blood pressures that cause bone-hard rigidity. If scar tissue forms on the sheath of the erectile chambers, it can cause penile curvature and pain with erections, a.k.a. Peyronie’s disease.

On Becoming Slack In The Sac

While the penis may shrink, the scrotal sac expands, time and gravity being cruel conspirators. This smaller penis and larger and looser scrotum–appearing like the genitals of an old hound dog snoozing on the veranda–is not a particularly appealing sight! While the sac expands, the testicles often shrink in size. One of the complaints voiced not infrequently by middle-aged and older men is that their testicles hang down loosely, similar to pendulous breasts in older women. At times, men complain that when they sit on the toilet, their scrotum touches the toilet water. Ouch! The scrotum may hang so low that when you pass wind, your testicles may become airborne like a kite flying erratically in a sudden gust.

Urinary Woes

The only male organs that get bigger with age are our noses, ears, scrotums and prostate glands. Unfortunately, the prostate is wrapped precariously around the urethral channel and as the prostate enlarges it can constrict the flow of urine. You may observe a weaker stream that hesitates to start, takes more time to get going and longer to empty, starts and stops and the sensation that you have not emptied completely. You might notice that you urinate more often, get up one or more times at night to empty your bladder and when you have to go, it comes on with much greater urgency than it used to. Almost universal with aging is post-void dribbling, that annoying dribble that occurs after emptying your bladder.

Bottom Line: If you are a middle-aged male and are experiencing some of these symptoms, “Welcome to the club.” If these symptoms become annoying and interfere with your quality of life, it is time to check in with your friendly urologist!

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

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A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Kindle, iBooks, Nook, Kobo) and paperback: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Co-founder of Private Gym: http://www.PrivateGym.com

available on Amazon and Private Gym website

The Private Gym is a comprehensive, interactive, follow-along exercise program that provides the resources to properly strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that are vital to sexual and urinary health. The program builds upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, who popularized exercises for women to increase pelvic strength and tone. This FDA registered program is effective, safe and easy-to-use: The “Basic Training” program strengthens the pelvic floor muscles with a series of progressive “Kegel” exercises and the “Complete Program” provides maximum opportunity for gains through its patented resistance equipment.

 

“Un-Juiced”: When Ejaculation Goes South

March 27, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD   3/21/15

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There is scarce medical literature on ejaculatory problems aside from those of ejaculatory timing issues (premature and delayed ejaculation) and hematospermia (blood in the semen). Despite being given short shrift in medical academia, not a day goes by in my clinical urology practice where I do not see at least several patients who complain of declining ejaculation function.

What Is The Origin Of The Word “Ejaculation”?

Ejaculation derives from ex, meaning “out”  and jaculari, meaning “to throw, shoot, hurl, cast.”

Trivia: You do not need an erection to ejaculate and achieve an orgasm. A limp penis cannot penetrate, but is eminently capable of ejaculation and orgasm.

If  “Semen” Or “Ejaculate” Is Too Medical For You:

The most popular slang is “cum.” It originates from the expression “come to climax” shortened to “come” and ultimately to “cum,” but not to be confused with the Latin “cum,” e.g., I graduated summa cum laude or the word meaning “along with being,” e.g., my basement-cum-gym! “Jizm,” “jism,” and “jizz” are also popular and are not to be confused with other         “–ism” words that mean a doctrine, e.g., socialism and capitalism! We cannot forget “splooge,” “spooge,” “spunk,” “wad,” “nut,” “load” and “man juice.”

What Happens To Ejaculation As We Age?

Ejaculation and orgasm often become less intense, with diminished force, trajectory and volume of semen. What was once an intense climax with a substantial volume of semen that could be forcefully ejaculated in an arc several feet in length gives way to a lackluster experience with a small volume of semen weakly dribbled out the penis.

Fact: I have never heard a patient complain that his penis is too large, nor have I ever heard anyone protest that his ejaculate volumes are too abundant.

Fact: The pervasive porn industry–where many male stars are hung like horses and whose penises seem capable of ejaculating flooding pools of semen– has given the average guy a bit of a complex.

So What’s The Big Deal?

Men don’t appreciate meager, lackadaisical-quality ejaculations and orgasms. Sex is important to many of us and getting a good quality rigid erection is foremost, but the culmination—ejaculation and orgasm—is equally vital. We may be 40 or 50 years old or older, but we still want to point and shoot like we did when we were 20. As the word origin indicates, we desire to be able to shoot out, hurl or cast like an Olympian Master Blaster and we yearn for that intensely pleasurable feeling of yesteryear.

Ejaculation Science 101

Sexual climax consists of three phases—emission, ejaculation, and orgasm. When the intensity and duration of sexual stimulation surpasses a threshold, emission occurs, in which secretions from the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, epididymis, and vas deferens are deposited into the urethra within the prostate gland. During ejaculation the pelvic floor muscles contract rhythmically, sending wave-like contractions rippling down the urethra to forcibly propel the semen in a pulsating and explosive eruption. Orgasm is the intense emotional excitement that accompanies the physical act of ejaculation.

Big Head Versus Little Head

Ejaculation is an event that takes place in the penis; orgasm occurs in the brain. The process of emission and ejaculation is actually a very complex and highly coordinated neurological event involving several specific centers in the brain (amygdala, thalamus and other areas), spinal cord and peripheral nervous system.

What’s Makes Up The Reproductive Juices?

Less than 5% of the volume of semen is actually sperm and the other 95+% is a cocktail of genital juices that provide nourishment, support and safekeeping for sperm. 70% of the volume comes from the seminal vesicles, which secrete a thick, viscous fluid and 25% from the prostate gland, which produces a milky-white fluid. A negligible amount is from the bulbo-urethral glands, which release a clear viscous fluid (pre-come) that has a lubrication function.

What’s Normal Volume?

The average ejaculate volume is 2-5 cc (one teaspoon is the equivalent of 5 cc). While a huge ejaculatory load sounds like a good thing, in reality it can cause infertility. The sperm can literally “drown” in the excessive seminal fluid.

Why Does The Seminal Tank Dry With Aging?

As we age, there are changes in the reproductive organs, particularly the prostate gland, one of the few organs in the body that enlarges as we get older. The aging prostate and seminal vesicles produce less fluid; additionally the ducts that drain the genital fluids can become blocked. In many ways, the changes in ejaculation parallel the changes in urination experienced by the aging male. Many medications that are used to treat prostate enlargement profoundly affect ejaculatory volume. Additionally, the pelvic floor muscles—which play a vital role in ejaculation—weaken with aging.

What About Those Pelvic Floor Muscles?

The pelvic floor muscles play a key role in ejaculation. The bulbocavernosus muscle (BC) is the motor of ejaculation, which supplies the “horsepower.” The BC surrounds the inner, deepest portion of the urinary channel. It is a compressor muscle that during sex engorges the spongy erection chamber that surrounds the urethra and also engorges the head of penis. At the time of climax, the BC expels semen by virtue of its strong rhythmic contractions, allowing ejaculation to occur and contributing to orgasm. A weakened BC muscle may result in semen dribbling with diminished force or trajectory, whereas a strong BC can generate powerful contractions that can forcibly ejaculate semen at the time of climax. 

How To Get The Juices Flowing Again?

Pelvic floor muscle training can be useful to improve the dynamics of ejaculation. The stronger the BC, the better the capacity for engorgement of the erection chamber that envelopes the urethra and the higher the ejaculatory horsepower, resulting in optimized urethral pressurization and ejaculation. The intensified ejaculation resulting from a robust BC can enhance the orgasm that accompanies the physical act of ejaculation.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in your email in box go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Co-creator of Private Gym pelvic floor muscle training program for men: www.PrivateGym.com Gym—also available on Amazon

The Private Gym is a comprehensive, interactive, follow-along exercise program that provides the resources to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that are vital to sexual and urinary health. The program builds upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, who popularized exercises for women to increase pelvic muscle strength and tone. This FDA registered program is effective, safe and easy-to-use. The “Basic Training” program strengthens the pelvic floor muscles with a series of progressive “Kegel” exercises and the “Complete Program” provides maximal opportunity for gains through its patented resistance equipment.

Gone In 60 Seconds: What You Need To Know About Premature Ejaculation

March 7, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD  3/7/15

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(Thank you Pixabay for above image)

 

Be sure that you do not sail too fast and leave your mistress behind.

—Ovid

 

What Is Premature Ejaculation?

Premature ejaculation (PE) is a condition in which sexual climax occurs before, upon, or shortly after vaginal penetration, prior to one’s desire to do so, with minimal voluntary control. It is the most common form of male sexual dysfunction.   “Rapid” ejaculation may be a kinder term than “premature” ejaculation.

The key features are:

  • Brief time to ejaculation (often less than one minute)
  • Lack of control over ejaculation
  • Sexual dissatisfaction, distress and frustration of sufferer and partner.

How Long Should It Take To Climax?

In a study of over 1500 men, The Journal of Sexual Medicine reported that the average time between penetration and ejaculation for a premature ejaculator was 1.8 minutes, compared to 7.3 minutes for non-premature ejaculators.

Another study of 500 couples across five countries reported results ranging from 33 seconds to 44 minutes with the median being 5.4 minutes.

What Causes PE?

PE can be psychological and/or biological and can occur because of over-sensitive genital skin, hyperactive reflexes, extreme arousal or infrequent sexual activity. Other factors are genetics, guilt, fear, performance anxiety, inflammation and/or infection of the prostate or urethra and also can be related to the use of alcohol or other substances.

PE occurs in up to 30% of men, involving all ages, ethnicities, and socio-economic groups. PE can cause embarrassment, frustration and loss of self-confidence and can be devastating to a relationship. It is very typical among men during their earliest sexual experiences.

Who Knew? “Coming Attractions.” One can always use the excuse that being “fast and furious” occurred because of the tremendous attraction and turn-on of your smoking hot partner. However, this trump card can only be played once or twice before it gets very old.  

PE can be lifelong or acquired and sometimes occurs on a situational basis. Lifelong PE is thought to have a strong biological component. Acquired PE can be biological, based on inflammation/infection of the reproductive tract or psychological, based upon situational stressors. PE can sometimes be related to ED, with the rapid ejaculation brought on by the desire to climax before losing the erection.

Emphasis on ejaculation as the focal point of sexual intercourse tends to increase the performance anxiety that can initiate the problem. Once PE has occurred and established itself, fear of and mental preoccupation with the issue can actually induce the unwanted rapid ejaculation, creating a vicious cycle.

How Does One Overcome PE?

Diversionary Thoughts: Non-erotic mental diversionary tactics (concentrating on thoughts other than ejaculating) may prevent PE. Baseball, work, counting backwards, etc., are examples of such thoughts, but these are rarely effective and diminish the pleasure of sexual intimacy.

Down Tempo: This requires one to develop a mindfulness of the sensation immediately before ejaculation. By slowing the pace of pelvic thrusting and varying the angle and depth of penetration before the “point of no return” has passed, the feeling of imminent ejaculation may dissipate.

Pause-Start Method: If slowing the tempo is not sufficient to prevent the PE, one may need to stop thrusting completely while maintaining penetration in order for the ejaculatory “urgency” to go away. Once the sensation to ejaculate subsides, pelvic thrusting may be resumed.

Squeeze Technique: Originated by Masters and Johnson, as imminent ejaculation approaches, the penis is withdrawn and the head of the penis is squeezed until the feeling of ejaculation passes, after which intercourse is resumed. Although effective, it requires sexual interruption, is cumbersome and demands a very cooperative partner.

Pelvic Floor Muscle Training: Contracting one’s pelvic floor muscles is a less cumbersome alternative to the Master and Johnson technique. Instead of the clunky and obvious squeeze technique, a more subtle and discreet method is to slow the pace of intercourse, pause the pelvic thrusting and do a sustained pelvic muscle contraction. This is an internal “squeeze” without the external hand squeeze and can achieve the same goal, short-circuiting the premature ejaculation. With sufficient practice and the achievement of “muscle memory,” this process can become easier and the problem of PE improved, particularly with commitment to a pelvic floor muscle training program.

Decreasing Sensitivity: One method of doing so is by using thick condoms. Alternatively, local anesthetics in the form of topical creams, gels, and sprays can desensitize the penis. These include Lidocaine cream or gel, Lidocaine and Prilocaine (EMLA cream) or Lidocaine spray (Promescent) that are applied before intercourse. Another desensitization technique is increasing the frequency of ejaculation since PE tends to be more pronounced after longer periods of sexual abstinence. By masturbating prior to engaging in sexual intercourse, the PE may be controlled.

Erection Pills: Viagra, Levitra, Cialis and Stendra, which are commonly used for ED, can have a role in the treatment of men with acquired PE that is due to ED.

SSRI Anti-depressants: These selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors can substantially delay ejaculation. One is generally started on a low dose, with an increase in dosage as necessary. Once an effective dosage is achieved, the medication can be used on a situational basis, several hours prior to sexual intercourse.

Counseling: Since PE can be on a psychological basis, it may be beneficial to seek the counsel of a sexual therapist. This can be done in conjunction with some of the aforementioned techniques to hasten the resolution of the PE.

Bottom Line:   Although not life-threatening, PE is a common and distressing quality of life problem that is sometimes relationship-threatening.  The good news is that there are a number of effective treatment options available, so one need not suffer with the problem.   

 

Wishing you the best in health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the inbox of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health:available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B & N Nook, Kobo) and paperback: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Private Gym Male Pelvic Floor Muscle Training  Program: http://www.PrivateGym.com -available on Amazon as well as Private Gym website

The Private Gym is a comprehensive, interactive, follow-along exercise program that provides the resources to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that are vital to sexual and urinary health. The program builds upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, who popularized exercises for women to increase pelvic muscle strength and tone. This FDA registered program is effective, safe and easy-to-use. The “Basic Training” program strengthens the pelvic floor muscles with a series of progressive “Kegel” exercises and the “Complete Program” provides maximal opportunity for gains through its patented resistance equipment.

30 Interesting Kegel Facts

November 8, 2014

Kegel Facts

Andrew Siegel MD (11/8/14)

shutterstock_femalebluepelvic

 

  • Arnold Kegel (1894-1981) was a gynecologist who taught at the University of Southern California School of Medicine. He was singularly responsible in the late 1940s for popularizing pelvic floor exercises in women in order to improve their sexual and urinary health, particularly after childbirth. His legacy is the pelvic floor exercises that bear his name, known as “Kegels.”
  • Arnold Kegel invented a resistance device called the perineometer that was placed in the vagina to measure the strength of pelvic floor muscle contractions.
  • Arnold Kegel did not invent pelvic floor exercises, but popularized them in women. Pelvic floor muscle exercises have actually been known for thousands of years, Hippocrates and Galen having described them in ancient Greece and Rome, respectively, where they were performed in the baths and gymnasiums.
  • Kegel exercises are often used in women for stress incontinence (leakage with exercise, sneezing, coughing, etc.) and pelvic relaxation (weakening of the support tissues of the vagina causing dropped bladder, dropped uterus, dropped rectum, etc.).
  • Arnold Kegel wrote four classic articles: The Non-surgical Treatment of Genital Relaxation; Progressive Resistance Exercise in the Functional Restoration of the Perineal Muscles; Sexual Functions of the Pubococcygeus Muscle; The Physiologic Treatment of Poor Tone and Function of the Genital Muscles and of Urinary Stress Incontinence.
  • Kegel wrote: “Muscles that have lost tone, texture and function can be restored to use by active exercise against progressive resistance since muscles increase in strength in direct proportion to the demands placed upon them.”
  • Kegel believed that at least thirty hours of exercise is necessary to obtain maximal development of the pelvic floor muscles.
  • Kegel believed that surgical procedures for female incontinence and pelvic relaxation are facilitated by pre-operative and post-operative pelvic floor muscle exercises.
  • Kegel believed that well-developed pelvic muscles in females are associated with few sexual complaints and that “sexual feeling in the vagina is closely related to muscle tone and can be improved through muscle education and resistive exercise.” Following restoration of pelvic floor muscle function in women with incontinence or pelvic relaxation, he noted many patients with “more sexual feeling.”
  • Kegel believed that impaired function of the genital muscles is rarely observed in tail-wagging animals, suggesting that with constant movement of the tail, the pelvic floor muscles are activated sufficiently to maintain tone or to restore function following injury.
  • The pelvic floor muscles form the floor of the all-important core group of muscles.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are involved in 3 “S” functions: support of the pelvic organs; sphincter control of the bladder and the bowel; and sexual
  • Men have virtually the same pelvic floor muscles as do women with one minor variation: in men the bulbocavernosus muscle is a single muscle vs. in women it has a left and right component as it splits around the vagina.
  • Men can derive similar benefits from Kegel exercises in terms of improving their sexual and urinary health as do women.
  • Kegel exercises can improve urinary control in men, ranging from stress urinary incontinence that follows prostate surgery, to overactive bladder, to post-void dribbling.
  • Kegel exercises can improve sexual function in men, enhancing erections and ejaculation.
  • If the pelvic floor muscles are weak and not contracting properly, incontinence and sexual dysfunction can result. If they are hyper-contractile, spastic and tense, they can cause tension myalgia of the pelvic floor muscles, a.k.a. a “headache in the pelvis,” which often negatively affects sexual, urinary and bowel function.
  • The pelvic floor muscles contract rhythmically at the time of climax in both sexes. These muscles are the motor of ejaculation, responsible for the forcible ejaculation of semen at sexual climax. Kegel exercises can optimize ejaculatory volume, force and intensity.
  • The pelvic floor muscles have an important role during erections, activating and engaging to help maintain penile rigidity and a skyward angling erection. They are responsible for the transformation from a tumescent (softly swollen) penis to a rigid (rock-hard) penis. They exert external pressure on the roots of the penis, elevating blood pressure within the penis so that it is well above systolic blood pressure, creating a “hypertensive” penis and bone-like rigidity.
  • The Kegel muscles are located in the perineum, the area between the vagina and anus in a woman and between the scrotum and anus in a man.
  • The Kegel muscles are not the thigh muscles (adductors), abdominal muscles (rectus), or buttock muscles (gluteals).
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you see the base of the penis retract inwards towards the pubic bone and the testicles rise up as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you can make your erect penis lift up as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you can interrupt your urinary stream as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • The 1909 Gray’s Anatomy referred to one of the male Kegel muscles as the erector penis and another as the ejaculator urine, emphasizing the important role these muscles play in erections, ejaculation, and the ability to push out urine.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are 70% slow-twitch fibers, meaning fatigue-resistant and capable of endurance to maintain constant muscle tone (e.g., sphincter function), and 30% fast-twitch fibers, capable of active contraction (e.g., for ejaculation).
  • Kegel exercises are safe and non-invasive and should be considered a first-line approach for a variety of pelvic issues, as fit muscles are critical to healthy pelvic functioning.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are hidden from view and are a far cry from the external glamour muscles of the body. However, they deserve serious respect because, although not muscles with “mirror appeal,” they are responsible for powerful and beneficial functions, particularly so when intensified by training. Although the PFM are not muscles of glamour, they are our muscles of “amour.”
  • The Kegel muscles—as with other muscles in the body—are subject to the forces of adaptation. Unused as intended, they can suffer from “disuse atrophy.” Used appropriately as designed by nature, they can remain in a healthy structural and functional state. When targeted exercise is applied to them, particularly against the forces of resistance, their structure and function, as that of any other skeletal muscle, can be enhanced. Kegel exercises are an important component of Pilates and yoga.
  • As Kegel popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises in females in the late 1940’s, so Siegel (rhymes with Kegel) popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises in males in 2014, with a review article in the Gold Journal of Urology entitled: Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Men: Practical Applications, a book entitled: Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health, and his work co-creating the Private Gym male pelvic floor exercise DVD and resistance program.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

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Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Private Gym: http://www.PrivateGym.com – now available on Amazon