Posts Tagged ‘clitoris’

How High Is Your V.I.Q. (Vaginal Intelligence Quotient)?

June 17, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  6/17/2017

You may know your I.Q., but do you know your V.I.Q.?  Let’s begin with a test of your knowledge of lady parts and determine your “Vaginal Intelligence Quotient” or V.I.Q.  See how many of 8 female genital structures you can properly identify. Answers are at end of this blog entry.  Note that there is one anatomical part that virtually no one gets right.  (Thank you Michael Ferig, Wikipedia Commons).

vulva_hymen_miguelferig

 

The Female Nether Parts

The female nether parts are a mystery zone to a surprising number of women, who often have limited knowledge of the inner workings of their own genital anatomy. Many falsely believe that the “pee hole” and “vagina hole” are one and the same. The truth is that the terrain between a female’s thighs is more complicated than one would think…. three openings, two sets of lips, mounds, swellings, glands, erectile tissues and very specialized muscles. While female anatomy may be mysterious to many women, many men are downright clueless and would be well served to learn some basic anatomy. Learn lady parts…knowledge is power!

“The vagina is a place of procreative darkness, a sinister place from which blood periodically seeps as if from a wound.”

“Even when made safe, men feared the vagina, already attributed mysterious sexual power – did it not conjure up a man’s organ, absorb it, milk it, spit it out limp?”

–Tom Hickman from “God’s Doodle”

The names of several lady parts begin with the letter “V”—vulva, vagina and vestibule. What could be a better choice since the area (the vulva) is V-shaped?

pixabay-v

Thank you Pixabay for image above

The Vulva 

The vulva is the outside part of the female genitals. It consists of the mons pubis, labia majora, labia minora, vestibule, vaginal opening, urethral opening and clitoris.

The mons is the triangular mound that covers the pubic bone, consisting of hair-bearing skin and underlying fatty tissue. It extends down on each side to form the labia majora, folds of hair-bearing skin and underlying fatty tissue that surround the entrance to the vagina. Within the labia majora are two soft, hairless skin folds known as labia minora, which safeguard the entrance to the vagina. The upper part of each labia minora unites to form the clitoral hood (prepuce or foreskin) at the upper part of the clitoris and the frenulum (a small band of tissue that secures the clitoral head to the hood) at the underside of the clitoris.

Figure_28_02_02

(Anatomy of the vulva and the clitoris by OpenStax College – Anatomy & Physiology, Connexions Web site. http://cnx.org/content/col11496/1.6/, Jun 19, 2013., CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30148635, no changes made to original)

The Vestibule

The vestibule is the “entryway,” an area located between the inner lips that contains the entrances to the vagina and the urethra. Urine exits from the urethral opening on the vestibule and not from the vaginal opening. There is a small amount of vestibule tissue that separates the urethral opening from the vaginal opening.

 The Vagina

The word “vagina” intelligently derives from the Latin word for “sheath,” a cover for the blade of a knife or sword. Most women (and men) falsely think of the vagina as the external female genitals. The external lady parts are the VULVA as opposed to the VAGINA, which is internal.

 The Clitoris

The word clitoris derives from the Greek “kleitoris,” meaning “little hill.” The clitoris is uniquely an erectile organ that has as its express purpose sexual function, as opposed to the penis, which is a “multi-tasking” sexual, urinary and reproductive organ. The clitoris is the center of female sensual focus and is the most sensitive erogenous zone of the body, playing a vital role in sensation and orgasm. If an orgasm can be thought of as an “earthquake,” the clitoris can be thought of as the “epicenter.” The head of the clitoris, typically only the size of a pea, is a dense bundle of sensory nerve fibers thought to have greater nerve density than any other body part.

Like the penis, the clitoris is composed of an external visible part and an internal, deeper, invisible part. The inner part is known as the crura (legs), which are shaped like a wishbone with each side attached to the pubic arch as it descends and diverges. The visible part is located above the opening of the urethra, near the junction point of the inner lips. Similar to the penis, the clitoris has a glans (head), a shaft (body) and is covered by a hood of tissue that is the female equivalent of the prepuce (foreskin).  The glans is extremely sensitive to direct stimulation.

The shaft and crura contain erectile tissue, consisting of spongy sinuses that become engorged with blood at the time of sexual stimulation, resulting in clitoral engorgement and erection. The clitoral bulbs are additional erectile tissues that are sac-shaped and are situated between the crura. With sexual stimulation, they become full, plumping and tightening the vaginal opening. The crura and bulbs can be thought of as the roots of a tree, hidden from view and extending deeply below the surface, yet fundamental to the support and function of the clitoral shaft and clitoral glans above, which can be thought of as the trunk of a tree.

When the clitoris is stimulated, the shaft expands with accompanying swelling of the glans. With increasing stimulation, clitoral retraction occurs, in which the clitoral shaft and glans withdraw from their overhanging position, pulling inwards against the pubic bone.

The clitoris is a subtle and mysterious organ, a curiosity to many women and men alike. It is similar to the penis in that it becomes engorged when stimulated and because of its concentration of nerve fibers, is the site where most orgasms are triggered. Clitorises, like penises, come in all different sizes and shapes. In fact, a large clitoris does not appear much different from a small penis. The average length of the clitoral shaft including the glans is 0.8 inches (range of 0.2-1.4 inches). The average width of the clitoral glans is 0.2 inches (range of 0.1-0.4 inches).

The clitoris becomes engorged and erect during sexual stimulation. Two of the pelvic floor muscles—the bulbocavernosus (BC) and ischiocavernosus (IC)—engage and contract and compress the deep internal portions of the clitoris, maintaining blood pressures within the clitoral erection chambers to levels that are significantly higher than systemic blood pressures.

The bulbocavernosus reflex is a contraction of the BC and IC muscles (and other pelvic floor muscles including the anal sphincter) that occurs when the clitoris is stimulated. This reflex is important for maintaining clitoral rigidity, since with each contraction of the BC and IC muscles there is a surge of blood flow to the clitoris, perpetuating clitoral engorgement and erection.

 

vulva_hymen_miguelferig

Thank you Michael Ferig, Wikipedia Commons, for illustration above

Answers to Anatomy Quiz:

LM: labia majora (outer lips); VV: vaginal vestibule; Lm: labia minora (inner lips);  C: clitoris; U: urethra (urinary channel); V: vagina; H: hymenal ring (remnant of membrane that partially covered vaginal opening); A: anus (butthole)

Your V.I.Q.:

0 correct:  Vaginally feeble

1-2 correct: Vaginally deficient

3-4 correct: Vaginally average

5-6 correct: Vaginally superior

7 correct: Vaginally gifted

8 correct: Vaginal Genius…as sharp as a seasoned gynecologist!

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health  http://www.TheKegelFix.com (much of the content from today’s entry was excerpted from The Kegel Fix)

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Are You “Cliterate”? (Do You Have A Good Working Knowledge Of The Clitoris?)

March 18, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  3/18/17

The clitoris—possessed by all female mammals—is a complex and mysterious organ. Even the word itself–and the way it rolls off the tongue as it is pronounced–is a curiosity.  Many men (and women as well) are relatively clueless (“uncliterate”) about this unique and fascinating female anatomical structure.  The greatest challenge of achieving cliteracy is that so much of this mysterious lady part is subterranean–in the nether regions, unexposed, under the surface, obscured from view–and therefore difficult to decipher.  

The intention of this entry is to enable understanding of what is under the (clitoral) hood, literally and figuratively. Regardless of gender, a greater knowledge and appreciation of the anatomy, function and nuances of this special and unique biological structure will most certainly prove to be useful.  In general terms, proficiency and command of geography and landmarks on the map is always helpful in directing one to arrive at the proper destination.  Consider this entry a clitoral GPS.

 

Klitoriswurzel,_Klitoris,_Klitorisschenkel

The clitoris is mostly subterranean–what you see is merely the “tip of the iceberg.”  The white lines indicate the “rest of the iceberg.”

(By Remas6 [CC0], via Wikimedia Commons)

Mountainous and Hilly Female Terrain

The vulva (the external part of the female genital anatomy) consists of hilly terrain. It is well worth learning the “lay of the land” so that it can be traversed with finesse. The mons pubis (pubic mound) is the rounded and prominent mass of fatty tissue overlying the pubic bone, derived from the Latin “mons,” meaning “mountain.” Located beneath the lower part of the mons is the upper portion of the clitoris.  The word clitoris derives from the Greek “kleitoris,” meaning “little hill.”

Mons_pubis_jpg

Lower abdomen, mons pubis and pudendal cleft

By Wikipicturesxd (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The Epicenter of Female Sexual Anatomy

The clitoris is arguably the most vital structure involved with female sexual response and sexual climax. It is the only human organ that exists solely for pleasure, the penis being a multi-tasker with reproductive and urinary roles as well as being a sexual organ. However, I would argue that nature had much more than simply pleasure in mind when it came to the design of the clitoris, with the ultimate goal being reproduction and perpetuation of the species.  If sex was not pleasurable, there would little incentive for it and pregnancies would be significantly fewer. Think about non-human mammals—what would be their motivation to reproduce if sex were not pleasurable? (Male chimps and female chimps do not sit down together and plan on having a family!)  So, pleasure is the bait and reproduction is the switch in nature’s clever scheme.

The clitoris, like the penis, consists largely of spongy erectile tissue that is rich in blood vessels. The presence of this vascular tissue results in clitoral swelling with sexual arousal, causing clitoral fullness and ultimately a clitoral “erection.”

Penile-Clitoral_Structure

Comparison of penis (left) and clitoris (right), each largely composed of spongy, vascular, erectile tissue

By Esseh (Self-made. Based on various anatomy texts.) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Clitoral size is highly variable from woman to woman—certainly as much as penile size. A very large clitoris can resemble a very small penis.

Interesting trivia: The female spotted hyena, squirrel monkey, lemur, and bearcat all have in common a very large clitoris referred to as a “pseudo-penis.”  When erect, it appears like the male’s penis and is used to demonstrate dominance over other clan members.  

The most sensitive part of the clitoris is the “head,” which is typically about the size of a pencil eraser and located at the upper part of the vulva where the inner lips meet. Despite its small size, the head has a dense concentration of nerve endings, arguably more than any other structure in the body. Like the penis, the head is covered with a protective hood known as the “foreskin.”

The head is really the “tip of the iceberg” because the vast majority of the clitoris is unexposed and internal. The clitoris (again like the penis) has a “shaft” (although it is internal) that extends upwards towards the pubic bone. The extensions of the shaft are the wishbone-shaped “legs” that turn downwards and attach to the pubic arch as it diverges on each side. Beneath the legs on either side of the vaginal opening are the clitoral “bulbs,” sac-shaped erectile tissues that lie beneath the outer vaginal lips. With sexual stimulation, these bulbs become full, plumping and tightening the vaginal opening.

One can think of the legs and bulbs as the roots of a tree, hidden from view and extending deeply below the surface, fundamental to the support and function of the clitoral shaft and head above, comparable to the tree’s trunk and branches.

vulva

Image above by OpenStax College – Anatomy & Physiology, Connexions Web site. http://cnx.org/content/col11496/1.6/, Jun 19, 2013., CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30148635, no changes made to original

The Clitoral Response

With sexual arousal and stimulation, the clitoris engorges, resulting in thickening of the clitoral shaft and swelling of the head. With increasing clitoral stimulation, a clitoral erection occurs and ultimately the clitoral shaft and head withdraw from their overhanging position (clitoral “retraction”), pulling inwards against the pubic bone (like a turtle pulling its head in).

Interesting trivia: The blood pressure within the clitoris at the time of a clitoral erection is extremely high, literally at hypertensive (high blood pressure) levels. This is largely on the basis of the contractions of the pelvic floor/perineal muscles that surround the clitoral legs and bulbs and force pressurized blood into the clitoral shaft and head. The only locations in the body where hypertension is normal and, in fact, desirable are the penis and clitoris.

Why The Pelvic Floor Muscles Are Vital To Female Sexual Health And Clitoral Function

During arousal the pelvic floor muscles help increase pelvic blood flow, contributing to vaginal lubrication, genital engorgement and the transformation of the clitoris from flaccid to softly swollen to rigidly engorged.  The pelvic floor muscles enable tightening of the vagina at will and function to compress the deep roots of the clitoris, elevating clitoral blood pressure to maintain clitoral erection. At the time of climax, they contract rhythmically.  An orgasm would not be an orgasm without the contribution of these important muscles.

 

Bulbospongiosus-Female

Bulbocavernosus muscle (pelvic floor muscle that supports and compresses the clitoral bulbs)

 

Ischiocavernosus-female

Ischiocavernosus muscle (pelvic floor muscle that supports and compresses the clitoral legs)

(Above two images are in public domain, originally from Gray’s Anatomy 1909)

During penetrative sexual intercourse, only a small percentage of women achieve enough direct clitoral stimulation to achieve a “clitoral” orgasm, as this is usually restricted to women with larger clitoral head sizes and shorter distances from the clitoris to the vagina. Depending on sexual position and angulation of penetration, the penis is capable of directly stimulating the clitoral head and shaft, typically in the missionary position when there is direct pubic bone to pubic bone contact. However, vaginal penetration and penile thrusting does directly stimulate the clitoral legs and bulbs and the thrusting motion can also put rhythmic traction on the labia, which can result in the clitoris getting pulled and massaged.

Interesting trivia: Magnetic resonance (MR) studies have shown that a larger clitoral head size and shorter distance from the clitoris to the vagina are correlated with an easier ability to achieve an orgasm.

The clitoris plays a key role in achieving orgasm for the majority of women. An estimated 70% of women require clitoral stimulation in order to achieve orgasm. Some women require direct clitoral stimulation, while for others indirect stimulation is sufficient. Only about 25% of women are capable of achieving orgasm via vaginal intercourse alone.

With increasing sexual arousal and stimulation, physical tension within the genitals gradually builds and once sufficient intensity and duration of sexual stimulation surpasses a threshold, involuntary rhythmic muscular contractions of the pelvic floor muscles, the vagina, uterus and anus occur, followed by the release of accumulated erotic tension and a euphoric state. Thereafter, the genital and clitoral engorgement and congestion subside, muscle relaxation occurs and a peaceful state of physical and emotional bliss and afterglow become apparent.

Clitoral orgasms are often described as a gradual buildup of sensation in the clitoral region culminating in intense waves of external muscle spasm and release. In contrast, vaginal orgasms are described as slower, fuller, wider, deeper, more expansive and complex, whole body sensations. The truth of the matter is that all lady parts are inter-connected and work together, so grouping orgasm into “clitoral” versus “vaginal” is an arbitrary distinction. Most women report that both clitoral and vaginal stimulation play roles in achieving sexual climax, but since the clitoris has the greatest density of nerves, is easily accessible and typically responds readily to stimulation, is the fastest track to sexual climax for most women.

There is a clitoral literacy movement that is gaining momentum. Please visit:

http://projects.huffingtonpost.com/cliteracy for more information on the clitoris and this campaign to foster awareness of this curious organ.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health  http://www.TheKegelFix.com (much of the material from this entry was excerpted from this book)

Men Are From Mars, Women From Venus, But There’s Not Much Difference Between A Vagina And A Penis

December 10, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD 12/10/2016

What is it that most distinguishes a male from a female? The obvious answer is the genitals, with the penis/scrotum having a vastly different appearance from a vagina/vulva.  Despite the male and female genitals being the feature that most characterizes the difference between a male and female, there are striking similarities. The genitals of both sexes are biologically homologous– similar in structure and having a common embryological origin–with development into male versus female based simply on the hormonal environment at the time of development.  Today’s entry discusses the similarities (as opposed to the differences) between the genitals and the “homologues,” the specific anatomical structures that are of common embryological origin and are more alike than are commonly recognized. 

Whether one develops a penis or a vagina is determined at the moment the sperm penetrates the egg. The egg contains an X chromosome and the sperm either an X or Y chromosome. When the coupling results in an XX, the blueprint for female development is established; when the coupling results in an XY, the blueprint for male development is established. The bottom line is that the father determines the sex of the child.

Several weeks later, when the fertilized egg has turned into an embryo, the external genitals are identical. Female genitals are the “default” model, which will remain female, absent the presence of the male hormone testosterone (T). T is activated to dihydrotestosterone (DHT) that causes conversion of what would be a vulva and vagina into a penis and scrotum. Biochemical magic! The bottom line is that the developing embryo will remain female unless T/DHT are available to masculinize the external genitals.

In the young embryo there are three key genital structures: the “tubercle,” the “folds” and the “swellings.” In the absence of T/DHT, the genital tubercle (a midline swelling) develops into a clitoris. The urogenital folds (two vertically-oriented folds of tissue below the genital tubercle) become labia minora (inner lips). The labio-scrotal swellings (two vertically-oriented bulges outside the urogenital folds) fuse to become labia majora (outer lips). In the presence of T/DHT the genital tubercle morphs into a penis, the urogenital folds become the urethra and part of the penile shaft and the labio-scrotal swellings fuse to become a scrotum.

Genital Homologues

The penis is the homologue of the clitoris. Both structures are highly sensitive organs with a tremendous concentration of nerve fibers and contain erectile tissue (corpora) that enables them to expand in size and rigidity with stimulation. Both the penis and clitoris have a head (glans) and shaft and deep internal roots. Both are covered with a layer of skin that can be pulled back to expose the underlying anatomy. In the male this is referred to as the foreskin, which is the homologue of the female clitoral hood.

penile-clitoral_structure

Comparison of penis (left) and clitoris (right)–note similar shape and internal structure, Attribution: Esseh, Wikipedia Commons

The male scrotal sac is the homologue of the female labia majora. The raphe (the seam that runs vertically up the perineum, scrotum and penis) is the homologue of the pudendal cleft (the slit between the labia) in the female.

vulva_vs_scrotum

 

Comparison of vulva (left) and scrotum (right); note similarity of outer labia to scrotum and female pudendal cleft to male raphe,  by Richiex (Own work) [CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0) or GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

The male prostate gland is the homologue of the female Skene’s glands. Both produce fluid that is released at the time of sexual climax. The male Cowper’s glands are the homologue of the female Bartholin’s glands, both of which secrete fluid at the time of sexual stimulation, pre-ejaculate fluid in the male and vaginal lubrication fluid in the female.

 

male_anatomy_en-svg

Male anatomy, note prostate gland and Cowper’s glands, by Male_anatomy.png: alt.sex FAQ derivative work: Tsaitgaist (Male_anatomy.png) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

skenes_gland-svenska

Note Skene’s gland and Bartholin’s glands openings below and to side of urethra and vagina respectively, by Nicholasolan (Skenes gland.jpg) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html), CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/) or CC BY-SA 2.5-2.0-1.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/2.5-2.0-1.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Bottom Line: As different as female and male anatomy are, so they are similar.  The study of comparative genital anatomy and embryological origin is fascinating.  Next week’s entry addresses when this process of differentiation into male versus female goes awry, leading to “ambiguous” genitalia, and how the study of one such particular genetic defect led to the creation of a billion dollar blockbuster drug in common use for purposes of shrinking enlarged prostates and growing hair in men with male pattern baldness.   

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Andrew Siegel MD practices in Maywood, NJ.  He is board-certified in both urology and female pelvic medicine/reconstructive surgery and is Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and attending urologist at Hackensack University Medical Center. He is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro area and Top Doctor New Jersey.

Dr. Siegel is the author ofTHE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health (www.TheKegelFix.com) and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health (www.MalePelvicFitness.com). 

The Ins And Outs Of The Vagina

November 19, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD 11/19/16

Chances are that you may be clueless about female genital anatomy and for good reason, as you had no formal instruction…no “vagina-ology” class exists. Education often involves knowledge imparted from friends and schoolmates and perhaps a talk from a parent on the “birds and the bees,” generally less than adequate means. “Sex Ed” classes in junior high school (a.k.a. middle school) were cursory and insufficient. Your dad’s Playboy, your mom’s Cosmo and other magazines may have provided some insight, but were certainly not the gospel. Pornography offers a totally skewed perspective. As a consequence, most people have been educated through practical experience with their own vagina or with those of sexual partners. Although there is no substitute for “hands on” experience, a bit of vaginal academics is certainly a good addition to practical experience.

For many men—and women for that matter—the vagina is a dark and mysterious place, a “black hole” of human anatomy, hidden in the deep recesses of the body. This landscape is complex terrain and unfortunately does not come with a topographical map explaining its intricate subterranean geography.

The following are quotes about the vagina from Tom Hickman’s book: “God’s Doodle: The Life and Times of the Penis”:

“A place of procreative darkness, a sinister place from which blood periodically seeped as if from a wound.”

“Even when made safe, men feared the vagina, already attributed mysterious sexual power – did it not conjure up a man’s organ, absorb it, milk it, spit it out limp?”

The objective of this entry is to explore and demystify the vagina to help you comprehend and navigate its complexities. Knowledge is power and whether female or male, a greater understanding and appreciation of the anatomy, function and nuances of this curious and special female body part will most certainly prove useful.

Female Genital Anatomy 101

The hidden female nether parts and their inner workings are a mystery zone to a surprising number of women. Many falsely believe that the “pee hole” and the “vagina hole” are one and the same…not surprising given that lady parts are much more unexposed, subtle and complex than the more obviously exposed man parts. However, what lies between the thighs is more complicated and intricate than one might think…. three openings, two sets of lips, swellings, glands, erectile tissue, muscles and more.

Let’s first set the record straight on the difference between the vagina and vulva, geography that is often confused. When referring to external visible “girly” anatomy, most people incorrectly speak of the “vagina”—this is actually the “vulva,” divided in half by a midline slit known in medical jargon as the pudendal cleft or cleft of Venus or in slang terms, “camel toe.” The “vagina,” on the other hand, is the internal, flexible, cylindrical, muscular passageway that extends from vulva to cervix (neck of the uterus). The vaginal opening on the vulva is known in medical terms as the vaginal introitus. Further down south is the landscape between the vulva and the anus known in medical jargon as the perineum or in slang terms, “taint.”

vulva

(Anatomy of the vulva by OpenStax College – Anatomy & Physiology, Connexions Web site. http://cnx.org/content/col11496/1.6/, Jun 19, 2013., CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30148635, no changes made to original)

Bottom Line: The vulva is external, the vagina internal. Good to remember.

Fact: The word “vulva” derives from the Latin “cunnus” (hence the derivation of the slang C-word. The word “vagina” derives from the Latin word for “sheath,” a cover for the blade of a knife or sword, an apt term.

vagina-collage-public-domain

Above image (public domain) entitled “Vagina Collage”…note that it should be entitled  “Vulva Collage”

Many Functions Of The Vagina

The vagina is an amazingly versatile and multifunctional organ that is truly a “cave of wonders.” Beyond being a sexual organ, it is an inflow pathway and receptacle for semen, an exit pathway for menstrual blood, and a birth canal. It is not simply a passive channel, but an active and dynamic, highly responsive passageway that has the capacity for voluntary muscular contraction.

Anatomy Of The Vagina

The average depth of the vagina (without sexual stimulation) is 3-4 inches or so, but with sexual stimulation and arousal, the vagina is capable of considerable expansion and distension to a much greater potential. The elasticity of the vagina is truly impressive (perhaps the most elastic and stretchable organ in the body), with the ability to stretch to accommodate a full-term infant and then return to a relatively normal caliber. The width of the vagina varies throughout its length, narrowest at the vaginal opening and increasing in diameter throughout its depth. It is typically about 1 inch in diameter at the external opening.

Joke from Maxim.com:

  1. Just how deep is the average vagina?
  2. Deep enough for a man to lose his house, his car, his dog and half of all his savings and assets…

All vaginas are unique with a great variety in shape, size and even color, similar to variations in penile anatomy. The vagina is a banana-shaped structure and when a woman lies down on her back, the more external part of the vagina (closest to the vaginal opening) is straight, and the inner, deeper part angles/curves downwards towards the sacral bones (the lower part of the vertebral column that forms the back bony part of the pelvis). This vaginal “axis” often changes with aging and childbirth.

banana-25239_960_720

Banana representing vaginal axis, with inner portion curved towards sacrum and outer portion straight (Thank you Pixabay for image)

Fact: Although the vagina recovers remarkably well after childbirth, anatomy does generally change to some extent. Pelvic examination is usually easily able to distinguish between women who have and have not had children vaginally. Of note, elective C-section (no labor) preserves vaginal anatomy. Women who have an enlarged vaginal outlet due to childbirth may have difficulty in satisfactorily “accommodating” the penis, resulting in the vagina merely “surrounding” the penis rather than firmly “squeezing” it, with the end result being diminished sensation for both partners.

The vagina has pleats and corrugations called rugae that maximize the elasticity and stretchiness of the vagina. They are accordion-like ruffles and ridges that supply texture, which increase friction for the penis during sexual intercourse. In a young woman they are prominent, but with aging they tend to disappear.

Fact: Vaginal rugae are like tread on a tire…in young women they appear like deep grooves on a new snow tire, whereas in older women they appear like thinning tire tread, completely bald at their most extreme…aging can be cruel.

The vaginal wall has an inner lining of “skin” known as epithelium, which is surrounded by connective tissues and a muscular coat. The vaginal muscle is comprised of an inner layer that is circular in orientation and an outer layer that is oriented longitudinally. Contraction of the inner muscle tightens the vagina. Contraction of the outer muscle shortens and widens the vagina. The vagina is secured within a “bed” of powerful pelvic floor muscles.

To better understand  vaginal anatomy, it is useful to divide it arbitrarily into thirds: outer, inner and middle. The outer and inner thirds are where “all the action is,” the outer third being the hub of sexuality, the inner third the hub of reproduction and the middle third essentially a connection between the inner and outer thirds.

Outer third: The outer third of the vagina is rich in nerve fibers and is the most sensitive part of the vagina. The “orgasmic platform” is the Masters and Johnson term for the anatomical “base” that responds to sexual arousal and stimulation with pelvic blood congestion. It consists of the outer third of the vagina and the engorged inner lips.

Middle third: The middle third is a conduit connecting the outer and inner thirds.

Inner third: The cervix (opening to the uterus) sits in the inner third of the vagina. Its presence within the deep vagina defines the deepest recesses of the vagina, which are referred to as the fornices (singular fornix), derived from the Latin word for “arches.” The largest fornix is the one behind the cervix (posterior fornix) with the two smaller fornices above and to the sides of the cervix (anterior and lateral fornices).

Question: What do you think is the origin of the word “fornicate”?

sobo_1906_508

Image above:  Uterus, Cervix and Inner Third Vagina from Dr. Johannes SobottaSobotta’s Atlas and Text-book of Human Anatomy 1906, note the vaginal rugae and the relationship of the cervix with the inner vagina

Fact: In the man-on top sexual intercourse position, the penis reaches the anterior fornix, while in the rear-entry position it reaches the posterior fornix.

The Pelvic Floor Muscles And The Vagina

The pelvic floor muscles play a pivotal role with respect to vaginal and sexual function, their contractions facilitating and enhancing sexual response. They contribute to arousal, sensation during intercourse and the ability to clench the vagina and firmly “grip” the penis. The strength and durability of their contractions are directly related to orgasmic potential since the pelvic muscles are the “motor” that drives sexual climax and can be thought of as the powerhouse of the vagina. During orgasm, the pelvic floor muscles “shudder.”

There is great variety in the bulk, strength, power and voluntary control of the pelvic floor muscles that support the vagina. Some women are capable of powerfully “snapping” their vaginas, whereas others cannot generate even a weak flicker.

3-superficial-and-deep-pfm

Image above: Female pelvic floor muscles, illustration by Ashley Halsey from The Kegel Fix

Fact: “Pompoir” is a sexual technique in which a woman contracts her pelvic floor and vaginal muscles rhythmically to stimulate the penis without the need for pelvic motion or thrusting. Women who diligently practice Kegel exercises can develop powerful pelvic floor muscles and become particularly adept at this technique resulting in extreme vaginal “dexterity” and the ability to refine pulling, pushing, locking, gripping, pulsing, squeezing and twisting motions, which can provide enough stimulation to bring a male to climax.  

Fact: “Penis Captivus” is a rare condition in which a male’s erect penis becomes stuck within a female’s vagina. It is thought to be on the basis of intense contractions of the pelvic floor muscles, causing the vaginal walls to clamp down and entrap the penis. It usually is a brief event and after female orgasm and/or male ejaculation, withdrawal becomes possible. However, it sometimes requires medical attention with a couple showing up in the emergency room tightly connected, like Siamese twins. Not a good call to 911!

Sexual Function And The Vagina

Under normal circumstances, the vagina is not “primed” for sex and is little more prepared for intercourse than is a flaccid penis. The un-stimulated vagina is essentially a closed “potential space” in which the vaginal roof and floor are in contact. With sexual stimulation, the vagina expands with lengthening and widening of its inner two-thirds and flattening of the rugae. The cervix and uterus pull up and back. Pelvic blood flow increases and the vaginal walls undergo a “sweating-like” reaction as a result of pelvic blood congestion, creating a slippery and glistening film. Most of the lubrication is based upon seepage from this increased blood flow, but some comes from Bartholin’s and Skene’s glands. Bartholin’s glands are paired, pea-size glands that drain just below and to each side of the vagina. During sexual arousal they secrete small drops of fluid, resulting in moistening of the opening of the vagina. Skene’s glands are paired glands that drain just above and to each side of the urethral opening. They are the female equivalent of the male prostate gland and secrete fluid with arousal.

With sexual excitement and stimulation, in addition to vaginal lubrication from increased pelvic blood flow, there is congestion and engorgement of the vulva, vagina and clitoris.

Fact: The profound vaginal changes that occur during sexual arousal and stimulation are entirely analogous to the changes that occur during male arousal: expansion of penis length and girth, retraction of the testicles towards the groin, and the release of pre-ejaculate fluid.

With increasing stimulation and arousal, physical tension within the genitals gradually builds and once sufficient intensity and duration of sexual stimulation surpass a threshold, involuntary rhythmic muscular contractions occur of the vagina, uterus, anus and pelvic floor muscles, followed by the release of accumulated erotic tension (a.k.a. orgasm) and a euphoric state. Thereafter, the genital engorgement and congestion subside, muscle relaxation occurs and a peaceful state of physical and emotional bliss and afterglow become apparent.

Fact: Anatomy can affect potential for experiencing sexual climax.

Sexual intercourse results in indirect clitoral stimulation. The clitoral shaft moves rhythmically with penile thrusting by virtue of penile traction on the inner lips, which join together to form the hood of the clitoris. However, if the vaginal opening is too wide to permit the penis to put enough traction on the inner lips, there will be limited clitoral stimulation and less satisfaction in the bedroom. Furthermore, studies have suggested that a larger clitoris that is closer to the vaginal opening is more likely to be stimulated during penetrative sexual intercourse.

At the time of sexual climax, some women are capable of “ejaculating” fluid. The nature of this fluid has been controversial, thought by some to be hyper-lubrication and others to be Bartholin’s and/or Skene’s gland secretions. There are certain women who “ejaculate” very large volumes of fluid at climax and studies have shown this to be urine released because of an involuntary bladder contraction that can accompany orgasm.

Fact: “Persistent genital arousal disorder” is a rare sexual problem characterized by unwanted, unremitting and intrusive arousal, genital engorgement and multiple orgasms without sexual interest or stimulation. It causes great distress to those suffering with it and there are no known effective treatments. It typically does not resolve after orgasm.

The G-Spot—named after German gynecologist Ernst Grafenberg—was first described in 1950 and was believed to be an erogenous zone located on the upper wall of the vagina, anatomically situated between the vagina and the urethra (urinary channel). Stimulation of this spot was thought to promote arousal and vaginal orgasm.

Fact: There is little scientific support for the existence of the G-spot as a discrete anatomical entity; however, many women feel that they possess an area on the roof of the vagina that is a particularly sensitive pleasure zone. Although its existence remains controversial, the G-spot is certainly a powerful social phenomenon.

Regular sexual activity is vital for maintaining the ability to have ongoing satisfactory sexual intercourse with the vagina staying fit and healthy if one remains sexually active, as nature intended. Vaginal penetration increases pelvic and vaginal blood flow, optimizing lubrication and elasticity, while orgasms tone and strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that support vaginal function. “Disuse atrophy” is a condition when the vagina adapts to not being used, with thinning and fragility of the vaginal walls and weakness of the pelvic floor muscles. Use it or lose it!

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery. Much of the content of this entry was excerpted from his recently published book: The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health. For more info: http://www.TheKegelFix.com.

He has previously authored Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health; Promiscuous Eating: Understanding And Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship With Food; and Finding Your Own Fountain Of Youth: The Essential Guide For Maximizing Health, Wellness, Fitness & Longevity. Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro. Area and Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

The Kegel Fix is available in e-book format on the Amazon Kindle, iPad (Apple iBooks), Barnes & Noble Nook and Kobo and in paperback, all accessible via the following website: www.TheKegelFix.com. The e-book offers discretion, advantageous for books about personal issues, is less expensive, is delivered immediately, saves the trees, has adjustable fonts, as well as numerous hyperlinks—links to other sites activated by clicking—that access many helpful resources.  The book was written for educated and discerning women who care about health, well being, nutrition and exercise and enjoy feeling confident, sexy and strong.

Vaginal Tone: How Tight Is Right?

June 11, 2016

Andrew Siegel, M.D.   6/10/16

IMG_1544

The strength and firmness of the vagina is largely determined by the strength and tone of the pelvic floor muscles .  As a urologist who treats many female pelvic problems, questions about vaginal tightness and tone are not infrequently raised by concerned patients.  It is important to distinguish strength from tone.  A condition exists in which the pelvic floor muscles are tight and over-toned (“hypertonic”), yet weak, inflexible and with an impaired ability to relax after a contraction.  This is a pathological condition of the pelvic floor muscles which can give rise to pelvic pain, sexual dysfunction and numerous other symptoms.

The Effect of Vaginal Delivery

The most compelling factor affecting vaginal form is vaginal childbirth.  A recent article from the British Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology (Kamisian et al, 2015; 122:867-872) studied the relationship between childbirth and vaginal dimensions in women presenting with urinary control issues and pelvic organ prolapse. The average measurement of the vaginal opening (obtained upon abdominal straining) was 29 cm² in women who had vaginal deliveries versus 21.5 cm² in women who had not delivered vaginally. Having more than one child did not further increase the size of the vaginal opening in a significant way. Bottom Line: The researchers concluded that there are clearly anatomical differences present in women who have delivered vaginally versus those who have not and that most of the stretching effect of vaginal childbirth is related to the first delivery.

 The Vagina: A Mysterious But Amazing Place

Trivia: The word “vagina” derives from the Latin word for “sheath,” a cover for the blade of a knife or sword. The word “penis” derives from the Latin word for “tail.”

Although for many people–both women and men–the vagina is a dark and mysterious place, it is impressive how versatile and multifunctional an organ it is. The vagina wears many “hats,” functioning as an entryway for the penis during sexual intercourse, an inflow pathway and receptacle for semen, an outflow pathway for menstruation and a birth canal. The elasticity of the vagina is extraordinary, with an astonishing ability to stretch to accommodate a baby’s head and then return to a relatively normal caliber. That stated, pregnancy, labor and delivery–particularly vaginal deliveries of large babies–has the potential to profoundly affect the anatomy and function of the vagina and its supportive pelvic muscles.  Although not inevitable, this can result in vaginal laxity (looseness) and other pelvic floor dysfunctions including pelvic organ prolapse (dropped bladder and other pelvic organs), stress urinary incontinence (urinary leakage with coughing, sneezing and physical exertion) and sexual issues.

Trivia: Elective C-section (no labor) is generally protective against vaginal laxity, whereas emergency C-section (after prolonged labor) is equally as potentially damaging to the vaginal support system as is vaginal delivery.

Is Your Vagina Toned/Tight Enough?

If you have ever wondered if your vagina is toned enough and how it might compare with others, you are by no means alone. Like penis size for men, this can be a source of concern and anxiety for many women. A “fit” vagina and pelvic floor is a desirable physical attribute, correlating with youthful vitality, better sexual function for women and their partners and less risk for pelvic organ prolapse and stress urinary incontinence.

Trivia: Leonardo Da Vinci observed that while women generally desire the size of a man’s genitals to be as large as possible, men typically desire the opposite for a woman’s genitals.

Vaginal tone is strongly impacted by the strength and tone of the pelvic floor (Kegel) muscles, but is also influenced by the strength and tone of the muscle layers of the vagina itself. Vaginas come in all sizes and shapes and run the gamut from being very snug to very loose. The vast majority of vaginas are between these too extremes,  “toned sufficiently.” On one extreme, the vagina and pelvic muscles can be so snug that the vagina cannot be penetrated, a medical condition known as vaginismus, which can be a devastating physical and emotional problem. It is an extreme form of pelvic floor tension myalgia, a pelvic pain syndrome referred to earlier resulting from pelvic floor muscles that are chronically over-tensioned. Extremely narrow and tight vaginas are also common in the elderly population that is not sexually active, on the basis of disuse atrophy and the lack of hormone stimulation that accompanies menopause.

On the other hand, the vagina, pelvic floor muscles and other connective tissue support can be so lax that the vagina gapes open, allowing one or more of the pelvic organs to fall into the space of the vagina and at times, outside of the vagina. This can also give rise to other pelvic issues having to do with sexual function and urinary/bowel control. Laxity can lead to difficulties with retaining the penis with vaginal intercourse, retaining tampons and in achieving orgasm.  Vaginal laxity can also result in the vagina filling up with water while bathing and vaginal passage of air (vaginal flatulence). The perception of having a loose vagina can lead to self-esteem issues.

 The Role of Vaginal Tone In Sexual Function

To reiterate, vaginal fitness is an important factor in terms of sexual function and is largely determined by pelvic floor muscle strength and tone. Vaginal laxity is caused by weakened pelvic muscles, vaginal muscles and connective tissue that no longer provide optimal vaginal support. Women with a lax vagina who are sexually active may complain of less satisfying sexual intercourse with diminished sensation for themselves and their partners with an impairment in “accommodating” the penis, with the vagina “surrounding” the penis rather than firmly “squeezing” it.

Under normal circumstances, sexual intercourse results in indirect clitoral stimulation. The clitoral shaft moves rhythmically with penile thrusting by virtue of penile traction on the inner vaginal lips, which join together to form the hood of the clitoris. However, if the vaginal opening is too wide to permit the penis to put sufficient traction on the inner vaginal lips, there can be decreased clitoral stimulation and less satisfaction in the bedroom.

Trivia: George Carlin did a routine about women who have a special gift with the strength, tone and finesse of their vaginas and pelvic floor muscles that I will attempt to paraphrase. He referred to the vaginas of these women as “snapping,” which he defined as “quick muscular control and vaginal elasticity that can grab ahold of you.”  What he was actually describing was women with excellent command of their pelvic floor muscles. 

 So How Tight Is Right?

Dr. Arnold Kegel in the 1940s invented a device called a perineometer that was inserted into the vagina to record the pelvic floor muscle contractile strength.  There are numerous sophisticated measurement devices that exist today.

A simple means is the digital method (a finger in the vagina) to assess your pelvic muscle strength. Do so supine (lying down, face up) with knees bent and slightly parted. Use a hand-held mirror to get a visual of your vulva. The inner vaginal lips should be closed and touching, appearing like a shut clamshell. A sign of vaginal laxity is when the lips are parted like an open clamshell. Another sign of laxity is a reduction in the distance from the bottom part of the vaginal opening to the anus (the perineum). A more severe sign of vaginal laxity is gaping lips with a pink bulge (pelvic organ prolapse) emerging between the lips. Take a look while pushing and straining your abdominal muscles—as if you are pushing out a baby—as a “vaginal stress test.”

Gently place a lubricated finger of one hand in the vagina and contract your pelvic muscles, squeezing around the finger and trying to lift it upwards and inwards, ensuring that you are not contracting your gluteal (butt), rectus (abdomen) or adductor (inner thigh) muscles. Do this by placing your other hand on each of these other muscle groups, in turn, to prove to yourself that these muscles remain relaxed.

Grade your strength using the modified Oxford grading scale, giving yourself a number between 0-5. Note that the Oxford system is what physicians use and it is relatively simple when done regularly by those with experience performing pelvic exams. It is granted that since this assessment is subjective and is not your specialty, you may find it challenging, but do your best, as your goal is to get a general sense of your pelvic strength.

Oxford Grading of Pelvic Strength

0—complete lack of contraction

1—minor flicker

2—weak squeeze (without a circular contraction or inner and upward movement)

3—moderate squeeze (with some inner and upward movement)

4—good squeeze (with moderate inner and upward movement)

5—strong squeeze (with significant inner and upward movement)

What To Do About Vaginal Laxity

If you are unhappy with your vaginal tone, do not despair. Pelvic floor exercises (a.k.a. Kegels) can and will often help improve the situation. Achieving a well-conditioned pelvic floor will optimize vaginal tone, pelvic organ support and sexual, urinary and bowel function as well as positively impact core strength and stability, posture and spinal alignment.

Bottom Line:  A firm and fit vagina is desirable from the standpoint of pelvic, sexual and general health.  Having well-conditioned pelvic floor muscles can help prevent and treat vaginal laxity, pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and bowel control issues as well as contribute to a healthy and enjoyable sex life. Just as you make an effort to keep your external muscles in good shape, It makes sense to apply a similar effort to these important internal muscles.

Please check out the following 3 minute video entitled “Why Kegel?”:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kclY1vY3wG8

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– and MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo; paperback edition available at TheKegelFix.com

Author page on Amazon: 

http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook:

https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

The Kegel Fix trailer: 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc  

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

 

The Clitoris: What’s Under The Hood?

May 7, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD 5/7/16

The clitoris is a complex and mysterious organ possessed by all female mammals. Many men (as well as a fair share of women) are clueless (“uncliterate”) about this curious, unique and fascinating structure. The intent of this entry is to provide a primer of useful knowledge so that you can understand what is under the (clitoral) hood, literally and figuratively.  Advances in imaging—especially magnetic resonance (MR)—have provided a much clearer understanding of clitoral anatomy. Whether you are a female or a male, a greater knowledge and appreciation of the anatomy, function and nuances of this special female body part will most certainly prove useful and beneficial. 

Female External Genital Anatomy

The clitoris is part of the vulva, the outer part of the female genitals. The vulva consists of the mons, outer lips, inner lips, vestibule, vaginal opening, urethral opening and the star of the show–the clitoris.

5. vulva 

(Female external genital anatomy, from The Kegel Fix, credit to illustrator Ashley Halsey)

Clitoral Geography: Mountains, Hills and Earthquakes

The vulva is home to some hilly and bumpy terrain that is well worth gaining familiarity with so it can be traversed with finesse. The word mons derives from Latin meaning “mountain” because it is the rounded and prominent fatty tissue overlying the pubic bone. The word clitoris derives from the Greek “kleitoris” meaning “little hill.”

An earthquake is the shaking of the Earth’s surface caused by the sudden release of energy resulting from movements within the earth’s crust that creates seismic waves. If a female orgasm is thought of as an “earthquake,” the clitoris is the “epicenter.” The head of the clitoris—typically only the size of a pea—is an extraordinarily dense bundle of sensory nerve fibers.

 Pleasure (and Reproduction)

The clitoris is central to the female sexual response and sexual climax, the only human organ that exists solely for pleasure, although nature has secondary motives. The clitoris is a vital part of the anatomical design used for nature’s clever “bait and switch” trick, in which the pursuit of a pleasurable activity drives reproduction of the human species and the perpetuation of life. In the mammalian kingdom, if reproduction was not associated with sexual pleasure, how much sexual activity do you think would actually occur?

Male and Female Comparative Genital Anatomy

It might surprise you how remarkably similar the female and male external genitals are. In fact, in the first few weeks of embryonic existence, the external genitals are identical. The female embryo’s external genitals are the “default” model that will remain female in the absence of masculinizing hormones. The female clitoris and the male penis are essentially the same structure, as are the female outer lips and the male scrotum. In fact, there is not much difference in appearance between a very large clitoris and a very small penis.

Although the clitoris is the female equivalent of the penis, it is exclusively a sexual organ, whereas the penis is a urinary, sexual and reproductive organ. Like the penis, the clitoris is largely composed of erectile tissue that upon arousal and stimulation engorges with blood and with increasing stimulation becomes erect. After sexual climax, the clitoris returns to its normal relaxed state.

Interesting trivia: The female spotted hyena, squirrel monkey, lemur, and bearcat all have in common a very large clitoris. When erect, it appears very similar to the male’s penis and is used to demonstrate dominance over other members of their clans. It is referred to as a “pseudo-penis.”

The Tip of the Iceberg, But Far From Frigid

 Most of the clitoris is hidden and internal. Commonly misrepresented as a “bean” or “button,” the external nub is the clitoral head, merely the “tip of the iceberg.” The iceberg metaphor is an apt one in terms of anatomy, but is off target with respect to what a clitoris is—the seat of female genital passion—with its head having a greater concentration of nerve endings than any other body part, a far cry from “ice.”

Clitoral Anatomy

The glans (head) is the external and visible part of the clitoris. It is located just above the opening of the urethra. The remainder of the clitoris is internal and consists of the clitoral shaft (body) and its extensions, known as crura (legs). The prepuce (foreskin), a hood of skin formed by the inner vaginal lips, covers the clitoral shaft.

clitoris

(Anatomy of the vulva and the clitoris by OpenStax College – Anatomy & Physiology, Connexions Web site. http://cnx.org/content/col11496/1.6/, Jun 19, 2013., CC BY 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=30148635, no changes made to original)

The crura are wishbone-shaped and are attached to the pubic arch as it diverges on each side. The shaft and crura contain erectile tissue, consisting of spongy sinuses that become engorged with blood at the time of sexual stimulation, resulting in clitoral engorgement and erection. Beneath the crura on either side of the vaginal opening are the clitoral bulbs, sac-shaped erectile tissues that lie beneath the outer vaginal lips. With sexual stimulation, they become full, plumping and tightening the vaginal opening.

One can think of the crura and bulbs as similar to the roots of a tree, hidden from view and extending deeply below the surface, yet fundamental to the support and function of the clitoral shaft and head above, comparable to the tree’s trunk and branches.

Pelvic Floor Muscles

These important muscles are critical to sexual function in general and clitoral function in particular. They control the voluntary tightening and relaxing of the vagina, increase genital blood flow, support clitoral erection and contract rhythmically at the time of orgasm. Two of the pelvic floor muscles are especially vital to clitoral function: the ischiocavernosus and bulbocavernosus muscles that surround the crura and the bulbs, respectively. They stabilize the deep roots of the clitoris and compress the roots when engaged, increasing genital blood flow and maintaining clitoral erection, since their compressions push blood from the roots back towards the shaft and glans.

3. superficial and deep PFM

(Female pelvic floor muscles, from The Kegel Fix, credit to illustrator Ashley Halsey)

The pelvic floor muscles strongly contribute to the transformation of the clitoris from flaccid to softly swollen to rigid. By compressing the roots of the clitoris, they elevate blood pressure within the clitoris to maintain clitoral swelling and erectile rigidity. At the time of climax, these muscles contract rhythmically, and an orgasm would not be an orgasm without the contribution of these muscles working together with the clitoris.

Interesting trivia: The blood pressure within the clitoris at the time of a clitoral erection is hypertensive (high blood pressure) range, accounting for the rigidity. This is largely on the basis of the contractions of the aforementioned pelvic floor muscles. The only regions of the body where hypertension is desirable are the penis and clitoris.

Sexual Function And The Clitoris

With arousal and sexual stimulation, the clitoral erectile tissue engorges, resulting in clitoral shaft thickening and swelling of the glans. With increasing clitoral stimulation, clitoral retraction occurs, in which the clitoral shaft and glans withdraw from their overhanging position, pulling inwards against the pubic bone.

When a sufficient threshold of sexual stimulation is reached, climax occurs with contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, vagina, urethra, uterus and anus.

The clitoris plays a central role in orgasm for the majority of women and for most, clitoral stimulation is necessary to achieve orgasm. Some women require direct clitoral stimulation, while for others indirect stimulation is sufficient; about 25% are capable of achieving orgasm via vaginal intercourse alone. Vaginal intercourse often results in indirect clitoral stimulation since the crura and bulbs flank the vaginal opening and these inner parts of the clitoris are stimulated with penetrative thrusting.

Interesting trivia: Magnetic resonance studies have shown that a larger clitoral head size and shorter distance from the clitoris to the vagina are correlated with an easier ability to achieve a vaginal orgasm.

There is a clitoral literacy movement that is gaining momentum. Please visit:

http://projects.huffingtonpost.com/cliteracy for more information on the clitoris and this campaign to foster awareness of this curious organ.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health– newly available on Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, B&N Nook and Kobo (paperback edition will be available soon).

Author page on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Andrew-Siegel/e/B004W7IM48

Apple iBook: https://itunes.apple.com/us/book/the-kegel-fix/id1105198755?mt=11

Trailer for The Kegel Fix: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uHZxoiQb1Cc

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health and Promiscuous Eating: Understanding Our Self-Destructive Relationship With Food   

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  In the works is the female PelvicRx pelvic floor muscle training DVD. 

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store home to quality urology products for men and women. Use promo code “UROLOGY10” at checkout for 10% discount. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Clitoris and Clitoral Priapism

November 7, 2015

Andrew Siegel, MD    11/7/15

Pompeii_Priapus_2

(Fresco of PriapusCasa dei VettiiPompeii, in public domain)

The clitoris is the female version of the penis. However, the clitoris is a much more subtle and mysterious organ, a curiosity to women and men alike. It is similar to the penis in that it becomes engorged when stimulated and because of its concentration of nerve fibers, is the site where most orgasms are triggered. On rare occasions, the clitoris can become rigidly engorged for a prolonged time, a painful condition known as clitoral priapism.

Clitoral Anatomy and Function 101

The clitoris is an organ that has as its express purpose sexual function, as opposed to the penis, which is both a sexual, urinary and reproductive organ. This erectile organ is the hub of female sensual focus and is the most sensitive erogenous zone of the body, playing a vital role in sensation and orgasm.

Similar to the penis, the clitoris is composed of an external visible part and internal, deeper, “invisible” parts. The inner parts of the clitoris are known as crura (legs), which are shaped like a wishbone with each side attached to the pubic arch as it descends and diverges. The visible part is located above the opening of the urethra, where the inner labia join together. Like the penis, it has a glans (head) and shaft (body), and is covered by a hood of tissue that is the female equivalent of the prepuce (foreskin). The glans of the clitoris, typically only the size of a pea, is a dense bundle of sensory nerve fibers, thought to have greater nerve density than any other body part. Much the same as the penis, the clitoris houses paired erectile chambers that contain spongy sinuses that engorge with blood at the time of sexual stimulation, resulting in a clitoral erection.

With the increase in genital and pelvic blood flow that occurs with sexual stimulation, the penile and clitoral shafts thicken and lengthen accompanied by swelling of the glans. Two of the superficial pelvic floor muscles—the bulbocavernosus and ischiocavernosus –-engage and compress the crura of the clitoris and penis, fundamental to maintaining engorgement and clitoral and penile blood pressures that are in excess of systemic blood pressures.

Priapism

The word priapism is derived from Priapus, the name of the Greek and Roman mythological God of fertility. He is commonly portrayed in classical artwork as having a disproportionately huge penis.

Engorgement and rigidity—whether penile or clitoral—is an ingenious hydraulic design and feat of nature. On occasion the system fails and the engorgement/erection does not subside. This condition is known as priapisman unwanted, persistent, painful engorgement that is not on the basis of sexual stimulation. It has the potential risk of damaging the anatomy such that future engorgement and erectile function can be compromised.

Although priapism is much more commonly a male problem, it occasionally involves the female clitoris. Clitoral priapism is an emergency situation in which there is clitoral shaft engorgement and swelling resulting in clitoral, vulvar and perineal pain. Similar to penile priapism, there are many different underlying causes including blood and nerve disorders or side effects from prescribed or recreational medications.

Doppler ultrasound can be useful to check the flow in the arteries to the erectile chambers. Treatment may involve injection of a blood vessel constricting medicine directly into the erectile chambers. Surgical treatment sometimes becomes necessary, usually “shunting” techniques to promote drainage of blood. In one such shunting procedure, a surgical opening is made between the head of the clitoris and the erectile chambers to create an avenue for the exit of the blood.

Bottom Line: Clitoral priapism is a rare occurrence in which there is prolonged clitoral engorgement/erection resulting in swelling and pain. Like penile priapism, this is not s problem that should be ignored. Prompt medical attention can manage the situation and help prevent the possiblity of sexual dysfunction resulting from scarring and impaired erectile capacity.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

How To Make Orgasms More Orgasmic

July 3, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD  7/3/15

Public domain image, royalty free stock photo from www.public-domain-image.com

This is a timely blog topic for July 4th weekend, celebrated across the USA with fireworks!

The human body is a most remarkable machine. The more it is pushed towards its limits, the more it adapts and the stronger it becomes. When it comes to sex, the body reacts similarly—when the muscles that play a vital role in sexual function are toned and strengthened, the body becomes capable of experiencing more explosive and intense orgasms. Exercising your pelvic muscles—a.k.a. Kegel exercises—just might be the most rewarding workout that you aren’t doing. These exercises aren’t just for the ladies anymore. Men, it’s time to get with the program.

What’s An Orgasm?

Simply put, an orgasm is the sexual excitement, pleasure, and euphoric state accompanying the release of accumulated sexual tension.

A medical definition of the male orgasm is the climax that occurs once sufficient intensity and duration of sexual stimulation surpasses an ejaculatory “threshold.” Sexual climax consists of three phases—emission, ejaculation, and orgasm. When a certain threshold of sexual stimulation is surpassed, emission occurs, in which secretions from the prostate gland, seminal vesicles, epididymis, and vas deferens are deposited into the urethra within the prostate gland. During ejaculation the pelvic floor muscles contract rhythmically, sending wave-like contractions rippling down the urethra to forcibly propel the semen in a pulsating and explosive eruption. Orgasm is the intense emotional excitement that accompanies the physical act of ejaculation. Technically speaking, orgasm takes place in the brain, whereas ejaculation takes place in the penis, although the fact that an orgasm is a mind-body experience blurs the distinction.

For women, an orgasm occurs once sufficient intensity and duration of sexual stimulation surpasses a threshold that induces rhythmic muscular contractions of the pelvic floor muscles, as well as the vagina, uterus and anus, resulting in intense emotional excitement and a blissful state that accompanies the physical act of muscular contractions and release. In some women, Skene’s gland (the female equivalent of the male prostate gland) contractions induce the release of their secretions, referred to as “female ejaculation.”

How Can Fitness And Kegel Exercises Improve The Quality Of Orgasms?

Sex is all about movement and motion, a kinetic chain that demands aerobic fitness as well as strong core muscles and external hip rotators. This fitness optimizes the smooth, efficient and coordinated integration of pelvic thrusting and lateral hip rotation.

The floor of the core—the pelvic floor muscles—is of critical importance to penile and clitoral erections, ejaculation and orgasm. The other core muscles and the external hip rotators are involved with the kinetics and movements of sex, but the pelvic floor muscles are distinctive as they directly involve the penis and clitoris. The pelvic floor muscles anatomically support the erect penis and clitoris, cause a surge of blood flow to the genitals, and have a profound involvement in ejaculation and orgasm. They are the “motor” of ejaculation, which by virtue of their strong rhythmic contractions, drive ejaculation and contribute to orgasm.

Kegel exercises increase the strength, tone, power, and endurance of the pelvic floor muscles. Strengthening these muscles maximizes pelvic blood flow, penile and clitoral erectile rigidity, and orgasms, since the pelvic floor muscles when contracting rhythmically at climax provide the muscle power behind the physical aspect of orgasm. Pelvic floor muscle strength and proficiency is also a helpful means of improving ejaculatory control because command of the pelvic floor can help delay ejaculation. Additionally, these exercises can help increase the volume, force, trajectory (arc) and pleasurable sensation of ejaculation.

When it comes to orgasms, the pelvic floor muscles make the magic happen. Toned pelvic floor muscles are capable of generating powerful contractions that can forcibly ejaculate semen at the time of the male climax and can equally help optimize and prolong the female climax.

What Is The Best Means of Exercising One’s Pelvic Floor Muscles?

Effective muscle training derives from understanding pelvic floor muscle anatomy and function, the ability to isolate the muscles, a means of feedback to ensure that the proper muscles are being exercised, progressive intensity over time with the use of resistance to maximize muscle growth and adaptation, and allowing for the appropriate recovery time.

Wishing you the best of health and a wonderful July 4th holiday,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in your email in box go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com.  Work in progress is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Sexual, Urinary and Pelvic Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym pelvic floor muscle training program for men: http://www.privategym.com—also available on Amazon.

The Private Gym program is the go-to means of achieving pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance. It is a comprehensive, interactive, easy-to-use, medically sanctioned and FDA registered follow-along exercise program that builds upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel. It is also the first program designed specifically to teach men how to perform the exercises and a clinical trial has demonstrated its effectiveness in fostering more rigid and durable erections, improved ejaculatory control and heightened orgasms.

Pelvic “Trauma” From Cycling And Other Saddle Sports: What To Do

May 2, 2015

Andrew Siegel, MD  5/2/15

1995_Fremont_Solstice_parade_nude_cyclist_01

(Nude cyclist 1995 Fremont Solstice Parade…thank you Wikipedia Commons)

 When sitting on a saddle—whether a bike seat, motorcycle seat, horse, etc.—one places a great deal of body weight on the perineum (area between genitals and anus), putting anatomy that is usually protected into a vulnerable position. Prolonged time in the saddle can compress vital genital nerves and arteries and traumatize the pelvic floor muscles (PFMs) that are essential for erectile and clitoral rigidity. The scrotum and the inner aspect of the penis (penile roots anchored to the pelvic bones) as well as the labia and inner aspect of the clitoris can be compressed as well. Over time, with repeated stress to the pudendal nerve and artery, PFMs and penile root, damage may lead to sexual dysfunction.

Cycling, in particular, has the potential for wreaking pelvic havoc. The downward force of the cyclist’s weight while tilting forward on the saddle generates extreme pressure on the perineum that pinches the pudendal nerve and artery against the pubic arch. Both the duration and the magnitude of compression are factors in determining the degree of trauma. Moreover, many cyclists are lean and their limited body fat does not provide padding that could potentially offer some relief from saddle pressure. Cycling-related sexual dysfunction has multiple factors involved including the geometry and hardness of the saddle, the anatomical variations of the individual, the amount of time spent in the saddle, the cyclist’s weight, the intensity of the effort, and the style of sitting, which is nuanced and variable.

Wide Enough, Flat Enough, Firm Enough

The saddle nose is the part of the bike seat that is especially dangerous. Greater saddle width and the absence of a saddle nose have been the most important factors in preventing compression. If the saddle is not wide enough to support the ischial tuberosities (sit bones), body weight is borne by the perineum. It is important for a saddle to be flat enough because if there is too much curvature, the center of the saddle can push up into the perineum and cause compression. Additionally, it is important that a saddle is firm enough. Gel saddles actually cause more trauma than unpadded saddles by virtue of the body sinking into the soft padding. The reduced surface area of saddles with a narrow cutout can actually increase the extent of the pressure (on the edges of the cutout); however, for those cyclists who find that if they have a saddle that is sufficiently wide, flat and firm yet remains uncomfortable, they may need a cutout to help relieve some of the discomfort.

Numerous factors influence compression. A horizontal or downward-pointing saddle position causes less pressure. Heavier riders exert more pressure on their saddles than lighter riders. Lower handlebars may worsen the situation by forcing the rider to lean forward, putting more body weight on the perineum. As a cyclist goes from sitting upright to the bent over aerodynamic position, the torso and pelvis rotate forward and the sit bones are lifted off the saddle surface, shifting more weight onto the perineum. This is clearly a superior position for racing, but inferior for one’s genital health!
 On the other extreme, when standing on the pedals, there is no pressure. Mountain bikes cause a greater degree of sexual dysfunction than road bikes, likely because of the additional hammering and vibrational trauma from cycling over rough terrain; however, this is balanced to some extent by the use of suspension mechanisms, the increased time spent out of the saddle and more frequent dismounts.

Kegels For Your Pelvic Health: Resuscitate Your Genitals

Dr. Arnold Kegel popularized PFM exercises to improve female sexual and urinary health after childbirth. His legacy lives on with the exercises that bear his name—Kegel exercises. Men have the same PFM as do women and an equivalent capacity for exercising them, with parallel benefits to urinary and sexual health. Saddle sport participants can tap into their PFMs to pump some “life” back into their compromised genitals after a long ride.

Similar to using a bike pump to inflate tires so that they are well pressurized, with each contraction of the PFM, blood pumps into the genital tissues to help “resuscitate” them.

PFM training can be valuable to help lessen pelvic trauma from saddle sports. PFM training increases the strength, tone, and endurance of the PFMs and can ease saddle compression. Aside from committing to an exercise regimen, the practical application is to actively squeeze the PFMs for 1-2 seconds repeated 3-5 times, before, during and after cycling. Most cyclists will periodically take a break from sitting in the saddle by standing up and this provides a perfect opportunity to take the pressure off the perineum and to do a few PFM contractions to restore genital blood flow.

Keys To Reducing Risk Of Sexual Dysfunction

  1. Wear well-padded shorts. 

  2. Shift from sitting to standing every 10 minutes or so, and if numbness and tingling occur, shift position or stand more often. 

  3. 
Sit back firmly on your sit bones and not on your perineum: as you shimmy from nose towards rear saddle, you can feel the proper engagement. 

  4. Invest in an ergonomic saddle tailored to your anatomy—make sure it is wide enough to support your sit bones, firm enough so that your perineum doesn’t sink and flat enough so that you don’t slide and that it doesn’t wedge up under your perineum.

  5. Adjust seat and handle bar height and angle to minimize compression. 

  6. Do PFM contractions periodically while cycling and PFM exercises when not cycling. 

  7. If you start having sexual issues, seek help! 


Bottom Line: Cycling and other saddle sports may contribute to both male and female sexual dysfunction, especially for serious participants who spend prolonged time in the saddle. Pay careful attention to your perineum, a most valuable piece of human real estate.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in your email in box go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: 

www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback:          

http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Co-creator of Private Gym pelvic floor muscle training program for men:

http://www.PrivateGym.com 

The Private Gym is a comprehensive, interactive, follow-along exercise program that provides the resources to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that are vital to sexual and urinary health. The program builds upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, who popularized exercises for women to increase pelvic muscle strength and tone. This FDA registered program is effective, safe and easy-to-use. The “Basic Training” program strengthens the pelvic floor muscles with a series of progressive “Kegel” exercises and the “Complete Program” provides maximal opportunity for gains through its patented resistance equipment.

Your BFF Muscles

January 3, 2015

Andrew Siegel, MD  1/3/2015

(For those not into current slang, BFF refers to “Best Friends Forever,” describing a long-standing friendship that will go on forever.)

** Although this blog is seemingly directed towards men, au contraire. This information is equally relevant to the ladies! Remember that the clitoris is the female counterpart to the penis and it is qualitatively the same, although smaller in stature, and the pelvic muscles that support the genitals are virtually the same.

Gray1119

(Thank you Gray’s Anatomy 1918 for above image of comparative embryology of male and female genitals.)

 

> 600 Muscles, But Some You Just Can’t Live Without

There are over 600 muscles in your body and let’s face it, they are all important. However, some muscles are more critical to your survival and well being than others. It’s a no-brainer that your heart muscle is valedictorian, followed by your diaphragm. Your heart pumps blood and your diaphragm moves air, functions essential to your existence and quantity of life. Not far down from the top of the list are your pelvic floor muscles (PFM), which provide support to your pelvic organs, allow urinary and bowel control and give you the means to function sexually. Without them you are nothing other than diapered and limp.

A Brief Review of Muscles

There are three kinds of muscles: cardiac (heart), smooth (arteries, intestine, bladder, etc.) and skeletal. Skeletal muscles have numerous different functions, acting as movers, stabilizers, and compressors.

Movers (such as your biceps) act across joints, which allows you to curl your arm up. Stabilizers (such as the multifidis of the back) enable you to maintain good posture and stability. Compressors (such as the rectus abdominis, obliques and transversus abdominis) squeeze the abdominal contents. Other compression muscles act as sphincters; wrapped around the urinary and intestinal tracts, they open and close to provide valve-like control.

Your BFF

Gray406375px-Gray408

 

(Thank you Gray’s Anatomy 1918 for images of male and female PFM)

Two of the PFM —the bulbocavernosus (BC) and ischiocavernosus (IC) muscles—are particularly beneficial for your sexual health. They function as movers, stabilizers and compressors. When your penis is erect, these are your friends that are responsible for lifting your penis up and down as you contract and relax them. They stabilize the erect penis so that it stays rigid and skyward-angling with excellent “posture.” They compress the deep roots of the penis, responsible for the transformation of the penis from plump to rigid and maintaining that rigidity; additionally, they compress the urethra (urinary channel that runs through the penis) rhythmically at the time of ejaculation.

The BC surrounds the inner, deeper portion of the urethra. I refer to it as the ejaculator. In its relaxed state, it acts as an internal strut that helps anchor the deepest, internal aspect of the penis. When the muscle is contracted actively after urination, it compresses the urethra to expel (ejaculate) the last few drops of urine that sit in the deep urethra. During sex, it helps support the spongy erectile body that surrounds the urethra and the head of penis. At the time of climax, it is responsible for the expulsion of semen (ejaculation) by virtue of its strong rhythmic contractions.

The IC surrounds the inner, deeper portion of the erectile bodies, so I refer to it as the erector. In its relaxed state, it acts as an internal strut that helps anchor the deepest aspect of the erectile bodies to the pelvic bones. The IC stabilizes the erect penis and compresses the erectile bodies, decreasing the return of blood to foster penile blood pressures in the severe hypertensive range that allow the penis to have bone-like penile rigidity. At the time of climax, it contracts rhythmically and is responsible for maximal erectile rigidity at the time of ejaculation.

How to Turn Your Best Friends Into Super-Compressors

Use It Or Lose It. Keep your BC and IC muscles in shape by using them the way nature intended. Studies have clearly demonstrated that men who are more sexually active tend to have fewer problems with ED as they age.

Exercise Your BFF Muscles. The BC and IC muscles play a vital role with regards to both erections and ejaculation. Numerous studies have documented the benefits of pelvic exercises in the management of erectile dysfunction. But why wait for dysfunction to set in? Since sexual function inevitably declines with aging, whip your pelvic muscles into shape to help maintain your function. Take it even one step further: work out your pelvic muscles to achieve optimal function. As your pelvic floor muscles increase in strength, tone, and endurance, erections and ejaculation will improve accordingly. The pelvic muscles—like other muscles in your body—will gradually and progressively adapt to the load placed upon them and will strengthen in accordance with the resistance applied.

Bottom Line: If the core muscles are the “powerhouse” of the body, the pelvic floor muscles (floor of the core) are the “powerhouse” of the penis.  To maintain optimal “horsepower,” keep your pelvic floor muscles fit and toned. 

 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

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A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Kindle, iBooks, Nook, Kobo) and paperback: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Co-creator of Private Gym pelvic floor muscle training program for menhttp://www.PrivateGym.com Gym-available on Amazon as well as Private Gym website

The Private Gym is a comprehensive, interactive, follow-along exercise program that provides the resources to strengthen the pelvic floor muscles that are vital to sexual and urinary health. The program builds upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, who popularized exercises for women to increase pelvic strength and tone. This FDA registered program is effective, safe and easy-to-use: The “Basic Training” program strengthens the pelvic floor muscles with a series of progressive “Kegel” exercises and the “Complete Program” provides maximum opportunity for gains through its patented resistance equipment.