Posts Tagged ‘benign prostate enlargement’

Prostate Arterial Embolization To Treat Prostate Enlargement

February 18, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  2/18/17

Note: Today’s entry was supposed to be on the topic of female stress incontinence, but this very interesting prostate topic presented itself to me, so the female incontinence entries will be continued next week.

Benign prostate enlargement (BPH) is a common condition of the middle-aged and older male in which the enlarging prostate gland obstructs urinary flow. It causes a number of annoying lower urinary tract symptoms, including a hesitant, weak and intermittent stream, prolonged emptying time, incomplete emptying, frequent urinating, urgency, nighttime urinating, and at times, urinary leakage. 

There are numerous treatment options available and one of the newest minimally invasive options is “super-selective prostate artery embolization”—a.k.a. “PAE”—a  procedure that is done by an interventional radiologist (a specialist x-ray doctor who does internal procedures without using conventional surgical techniques).  The blood supply to the prostate is purposely blocked (embolized) using micro-particles that are injected into one or more of the arteries to the prostate.  As a result of this embolization of the prostate artery, the part of the prostate served by the artery shrinks, opening up the obstructed urinary channel and improving the lower urinary tract symptoms.

Urinary difficulties attributable to BPH are commonly quantified using the International Prostatic Symptom Score (IPSS), a questionnaire consisting of seven symptom categories, with a range of increasingly severe symptom scores from 0 through 35. The score is based on the severity of each of the following lower urinary symptoms: hesitancy, decreased urinary stream, intermittency, sensation of incomplete emptying, nighttime urination, frequency, and urgency. The questionnaire responses are graded, with each of the seven symptom categories contributing a maximum of 5 points, for a total possible score of 35. Symptoms can be ranked as mild (0–7), moderate (8–19), and severe (20–35).  This IPSS is a useful metric both before and after a procedure like PAE, in order to document clinical symptomatic improvement.

Before pursuing PAE, a CT angiogram of the prostate is performed to determine prostate arterial anatomy, to help plan the PAE and to exclude patients with severe arterial disease or anatomic variations that will not allow PAE to be a consideration. Prior to pursuing a PAE procedure, it is vital to check PSA, perform a digital rectal examination and rule out prostate cancer.

 Technique of PAE

The PAE procedure takes place in the radiology department of the hospital under the supervision of the interventional radiologist. The femoral artery (thigh artery) is cannulated and by using an injection of contrast, the arterial supply to the prostate gland is identified. The prostate artery most commonly branches off the internal pudendal artery. Embolization of the anterolateral prostate artery, the main blood supply to the benign prostate growth, is attempted on both sides. The most challenging aspect is to identify and catheterize the tiny prostate arteries that are often only 1-2 mm in diameter.  Micro-particles (polyvinyl alcohol, trisacryl gelatin microspheres or other synthetic biocompatible materials) are injected into the prostate arteries to purposely compromise blood flow and cause partial necrosis (death of prostate cells) and shrinkage. After the embolization on one side, an angiogram (x-ray of pelvic arterial anatomy) is done before the sequence is repeated on the other side.

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Because of variation in prostate arterial anatomy and the types of micro-particles used, the extent of necrosis and shrinkage of the prostate is quite variable. Furthermore, prostate volume reduction does not precisely correlate with symptom improvement.  Although ideally performed on both sides, when done only on one side (left or right prostate artery) it still results in improvement of symptoms without as significant a reduction in prostate volume.

Although clinical improvement in urinary symptoms is less predictable after PAE as compared to standard treatments including surgical removal or laser treatment of the obstructing part of the prostate, the PAE has numerous points in its favor. Advantages of this new procedure are avoidance of general anesthesia and surgery an preservation of ejaculation, as opposed to surgical treatments of BPH, which commonly cause retrograde ejaculation (ejaculating backwards into the bladder with semen following the path of least resistance).  The PAE procedure is ideal for the older male with symptomatic BPH and significant prostate enlargement who for one of a variety of reasons is not a good candidate for conventional surgery.

Side effects of the PAE include urethral burning, fever, nausea and vomiting and perineal pain from prostate ischemia (damage to the blood supply), short-term inability to urinate as well as the radiation exposure necessary to perform the procedure.

Bottom Line:  Growing evidence supports the use of prostate arterial embolization to treat benign prostate enlargement.  Selectively occluding the prostate arterial supply results in damage to the prostate blood supply and ischemic necrosis (prostate tissue death) with reduction in the volume of the prostate gland with improvement in symptoms.  Safe and effective, it is a promising minimally invasive option that is an attractive alternative to surgery for symptomatic patients with large prostates and concomitant medical problems who have failed to respond well to pharmacological treatments.

 Dr. John DeMeritt is an interventional radiologist at Hackensack University Medical Center in Hackensack, New Jersey, who has particular expertise and experience in PAE.  He reported the first case study of PAE in the USA, has conducted numerous studies on the topic as well as written several medical journal articles and has been interviewed on the subject by Dr. Max Gomez on CBS news: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SdV8ZxtLqZU

Thank you to Dr. DeMeritt for provided me with information on the subject matter, both verbally and in the form of several excellent articles, including his original case report.  He also provided me with the PAE image.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health  http://www.TheKegelFix.com

 

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Prostate Steaming For Better Urinary Streaming

November 12, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD 11/12/2016

A new, minimally invasive procedure for treating symptomatic prostate enlargement has been tested in clinical trials and has been shown to be safe and effective. I was informed about it at a recent urology meeting in Prague and was intrigued because of its simplicity. The prostate steaming procedure–called “Rezum”–takes less than 15 minutes and uses convective heat energy in the form of steam to open up the obstructed prostate gland. 

Convection Versus Conduction

Convection is the transfer of thermal energy by heating up a liquid, resulting in currents of thermal energy traveling away from the heating source.  This type of energy is used for the Rezum prostate steaming procedure.

This is as opposed to conduction, which is heat transfer via molecular agitation. Thermal energy that is directly applied to tissues heats up molecules and is transferred through tissues as higher-speed molecules collide with slower speed molecules. Conduction energy is commonly used in surgery to cut or coagulate tissues.

Benign Prostate Enlargement (BPH)

BPH is a common condition in men above the age of 50. Based upon aging, genetics and testosterone, the prostate gland enlarges to a variable extent. As it does so, it often compresses the urinary channel (like a hand around a garden hose), causing urinary obstructive and irritative symptoms that can be quite annoying.  Obstructive symptoms include: a weak, prolonged stream that is slow to start and tends to stop and start (to quote my patient: “peeing in chapters”) and incomplete emptying. Irritative symptoms include: strong urges to urinate, frequent urinating, nighttime urinating and possibly urinary leakage before arrival at the bathroom.

pre-treatment_v2

BPH (note the tissue compressing the urinary channel)

Medications or surgical procedures are often used to alleviate the symptoms of BPH.  One class of medication relaxes the muscle tone of the prostate (Flomax, Uroxatral, Rapaflo, etc.); another class shrinks the prostate (Proscar, Avodart). The erectile dysfunction medication Cialis has also been used (daily dosing) to help manage symptomatic BPH. Commonly performed procedures to improve the symptoms of BPH include Greenlight laser photovaporization of the prostate, Urolift procedure and TURP (transurethral resection of the prostate). The Rezum prostate steam procedure is a new addition to the BPH armamentarium.

Rezum Prostate Steaming

The prostate is a compartmentalized organ with discrete anatomical zones (compartments). The transition zone is the area responsible for benign enlargement. In the Rezum procedure, radio-frequency energy is used to convert a small volume of water to steam, which is injected within the  transition zone of the prostate via a retractable needle under direct visual guidance (cystoscopy). The steam adheres to the anatomy of the prostate zones, its spread limited by the zonal anatomy. Each steam (convective water vapor thermal energy) injection takes less than 10 seconds and utilizes no more than a few drops of water. The number of injections necessary is based upon the size of the prostate gland, but it generally requires only a few.

watervaportreatment

Steam being injected into prostate tissue via a retractable needle

Convection uniformly disperses the steam, causing targeted cell death of prostate cells. This slowly and gradually will un-obstruct the prostate and alleviate the symptoms of BPH.

It is unusual for the actual procedure to take much longer than a few minutes, although the patient will need preparation time before and recovery time after the procedure. After the Rezum is completed, a catheter is placed for a few days. Common temporary side effects include inability to urinate (the reason for the catheter), discomfort with urination, urinary urgency, frequency, and blood in the urine or semen. Symptomatic improvement may be noted as early as two weeks after the procedure, but it may take up to 3 months before maximal benefits are derived.

tissue_resorption_v2

Prostate anatomy 3-months following Rezum procedure

A multi-center, randomized, controlled study was recently reported in the Journal of Urology. 200 men were randomized to active treatment with Rezum versus control. The study concluded that convective water vapor energy provides durable improvements in the symptoms of BPH, preserving erectile and ejaculatory function.

Bottom Line: This quick outpatient procedure for BPH  is safe and effective, can be performed in an office setting using sedation and can treat certain anatomical variations (e.g. middle lobe prostate enlargement) that cannot be treated by some of the alternative methods. Erectile and ejaculatory functions are preserved in most patients, which is often not the case with the BPH medications, Greenlight laser and TURP. A disadvantage is that the Rezum is not immediately effective, requiring a catheter for several days and a period of several weeks before symptomatic improvement is evident. Our urology practice is now offering this procedure to patients.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

http://www.TheKegelFix.com

 

 

Breast Lift, Face Lift…Prostate Lift

April 1, 2016

Andrew Siegel MD 4/2/16

“Prostate lift” a.k.a. “Urolift,” is a new rather clever means of improving a man’s ability to urinate when it is compromised by obstruction of the urinary channel because of enlarged lateral prostate lobes.

Prostate 101

The prostate is a male reproductive organ that produces prostate fluid, a milky liquid that serves as a nutrient vehicle for sperm. Similar to the breast, the prostate consists of glands that produce this milky fluid and ducts that convey the fluid into the urethra (urine and semen channel). The prostate completely surrounds the urethra, enabling its many ducts to drain into the urethra. However, this necessary anatomical relationship between the prostate and the urethra can potentially be the source of many troubles for the aging male.

The Enlarging Prostate

Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is one of the most common conditions of the aging male  often causing bothersome lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS)—urinary frequency, urgency, nighttime urination, weak and intermittent stream and the sensation of incomplete bladder emptying—that affect quality of life by interfering with normal daily activities and sleep patterns. The relationship between BPH and LUTS is complex because not all men with BPH develop LUTS, and LUTS are neither specific to nor exclusive to BPH. Urinary tract infections, prostate cancer, urethral scar tissue, and impaired bladder contractility (underactive bladder) are other problems that can mimic BPH.

Why Does The Prostate Enlarge?

Aging, genetic, and hormonal factors cause the prostate gland to gradually enlarge, with the process typically starting at about 40 years of age. As the prostate grows (hypertrophies), it puts pressure on the urethra, much
 as a hand squeezing a garden hose can affect the flow through the hose. Although larger prostates tend to cause more of this “crimping” than smaller prostates, this relationship is not precise.

UroLift (Prostate Urethral Lift)

UroLift is a new, minimally invasive means of treating prostate obstruction using a cystoscope (a small telescope that is positioned in the urethra to view the urethra, prostate and bladder) to place implants within the prostate to compress the obstructing prostate tissue. It opens the urethra so that the prostate no longer blocks the outflow of urine. It does so while leaving the prostate intact, not requiring cutting, heating, lasering or removal of prostate tissue. It is advantageous because of reduced bleeding and the preservation of erectile and ejaculatory function. It is important to know that it is not applicable to all men with prostate enlargement as it is only appropriate for certain prostate anatomies and sizes.

The technique uses mechanical compression of the encroaching lateral lobes of the prostate, creating an open channel. The implants are similar in action to molly bolts, resulting in crimping and tufting of the prostate tissue. The implants are deployed under direct visual guidance at the 2 o’clock and 10 o’clock positions using a needle that houses the components of the implant. The needle is passed through the full thickness of the prostate and upon retraction of the needle, the prostate capsule is engaged by a nitinol tab that is attached to an adjustable suture. The suture is placed under tension and a stainless steel urethral end piece is attached to the suture, securing the compression. Between two and ten implants may be used, depending on the size of the prostate gland.

Urolift color with text 2

Because the procedure does not remove tissue and avoids thermal energy, it has minimal  — if any– adverse effects on erectile and ejaculatory function, a major advantage over many of the alternative treatments of BPH, both medical and surgical. Minor side effects include short-term urinary burning, urgency and blood in the urine. The procedure was pioneered in Australia in 2005, received FDA approval in 2013 and Medicare approval in 2016.

Bottom Line: The UroLift is a clever new procedure that is effective in alleviating the annoying symptoms of prostate obstruction in men with certain prostate anatomies and sizes.  It alleviates obstruction without removing tissue by compressing the obstructing lateral (side) prostate lobes and does so without adversely affecting sexual or ejaculation function. 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym and PelvicRx: comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training programs. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, these programs empower men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.  

Pelvic Rx can be obtained at http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com, an online store that is home to quality urology products for men and women.  Use code UROLOGY10 at check out for 10% discount. 

 

5 Things Every Woman Should Know About Her Man’s Pelvic Health

November 28, 2015

Andrew Siegel MD   11/28/15

4910841630_d096720d0d_o (1)

(Attribution: Pier-Luc Bergeron, A happy couple and a happy photographer; no changes made, https://www.flickr.com/photos/burgtender/4910841630)

Since this is Thanksgiving weekend and a broadly celebrated family holiday, I cannot think of a better time to blog about how wives/girlfriends/partners can help empower their men’s pelvic health.

  1. His Erections
  2. Prostate Cancer
  3. Bleeding
  4. Testes Lumps/Bumps
  5. Urinary Woes

 

Erectile Dysfunction: A “Canary in the Trousers”

If his erections are absent or lacking in rigidity or sustainability, it may just be the “tip of the iceberg,” indicative of more serious underlying medical problems. The quality of his erections can be a barometer of his cardiovascular health. Since penile arteries are tiny (diameter of 1-2 millimeters) and heart arteries larger (4 millimeters), it stands to reason that if vascular disease is affecting the penile arteries, it may affect the coronary arteries as well—if not now, then perhaps soon in the future. Since fatty plaque deposits in arteries compromise blood flow to smaller blood vessels before they do so to larger arteries, erectile dysfunction may be considered a genital “stress test.”

Bottom Line: If your man is not functioning well in the bedroom, think strongly about getting him checked for cardiovascular disease. His limp penis just may be the clue to an underlying more pervasive and serious problem.

Prostate Cancer

One in seven American men will develop prostate cancer in their lifetimes and most have no symptoms whatsoever, the diagnosis made via a biopsy because of an elevated or accelerated PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) blood test and/or an abnormal rectal exam that reveals an asymmetry or lump. Similar to high blood pressure and glaucoma, prostate cancer causes no symptoms in its earliest phases and needs to be actively sought after.

With annual PSA testing, he can expect a small increase each year correlating with prostate growth. A PSA acceleration by more than a small increment is a “red flag.” The digital exam is simply the placement of a gloved, lubricated finger in the rectum to feel the size, contour and consistency of the prostate gland, seeking hardness, lumps or asymmetry that can be a clue to prostate cancer. It is not unlike the female  pelvic exam.

Bottom Line:  As breast cancer is actively screened for with physical examination and mammography, so prostate cancer should be screened for with PSA and digital rectal exam. In the event that prostate cancer is diagnosed, it is a treatable and curable cancer. Not all prostate cancers demand treatment as those with favorable features can be followed carefully, but for other men, treatment can be lifesaving.

Bleeding

Blood in the urine can be visible or only show up on dipstick or microscopic exam of the urine. Blood in the urine should also be thought of as a “red flag” that mandates an evaluation to rule out serious causes including cancers of the kidney and bladder. However, there are many causes of blood in the urine not indicative of a serious problem, including stones, urinary infections and prostate enlargement.

Blood in the semen is not uncommonly encountered in men and usually results from a benign inflammatory process that is usually self-limited, resolving within several weeks. It is rarely indicative of a serious underlying disorder, as frightening as it is to see blood in the ejaculate. Nonetheless, it should be checked out, particularly if it does not resolve.

Bottom Line: If blood is present when there should be none—including visible blood in the urine, blood stains on his undershorts or blood apparent under the microscope—it should not be ignored, but should be evaluated. If after having sex with your partner you notice a bloody vaginal discharge and you are not menstruating, consider that it might be his issue and make sure that he gets followed up.

Testes Lumps and Bumps

Most lumps and bumps of the testes are benign and not problematic. Although rare, testicular cancer is the most common solid malignancy in young men, with the greatest incidence being in the late 20s, striking men at the peak of life. The excellent news is that it is very treatable, especially so when picked up in its earliest stages, when it is commonly curable.

A testicular exam is a simple task that can be lifesaving. One of the great advantages of having his gonads located in such an accessible locale—conveniently “gift wrapped” in the scrotal satchel—is that it makes them so easy to examine. This is as opposed to your ovaries, which are internal and not amenable to ready inspection. This explains why early testes cancer diagnosis is a cinch as opposed to ovarian cancer, which most often presents at an advanced stage. In its earliest phases, testes cancer will cause a lump, irregularity, asymmetry, enlargement or heaviness of the testicle. It most often does not cause pain, so his absence of pain should not dissuade him from getting an abnormality looked into.

Your guy should be doing a careful exam of his testes every few weeks or so in the shower, with the warm and soapy conditions beneficial to an exam. If your man is a stoic kind of guy who is not likely to examine himself, consider taking matters into your own hands—literally: At a passionate moment, pursue a subtle, not-too-clinical exam under the guise of intimacy—it may just end up saving his life.

Bottom Line: Have the “cajones” to check his cajones. Because sperm production requires that his testes are kept cooler than core temperature, nature has conveniently designed mankind with his testicles dangling from his mid-section. There are no organs in the body—save your breasts—that are more external and easily accessible. If your man is not willing to do self-exams, at a moment of intimacy do a “stealth” exam under the guise of affection—it just might be lifesaving.

Urinary Woes

Most organs shrink with the aging process. However, his nose, ears, scrotum and prostate are the exceptions, enlarging as he ages. Unfortunately, the prostate is wrapped precariously around the urinary channel and as it enlarges it can constrict the flow of urine and can cause a host of symptoms. These include a weaker stream that hesitates to start, takes longer to empty, starts and stops and gives him the feeling that he has not emptied completely. He might notice that he urinates more often, gets up several times at night to empty his bladder and when he has to urinate it comes on with much greater urgency than it used to. He might be waking you up at night because of his frequent trips to the bathroom. Almost universal with aging is post-void dribbling, an annoying after-dribble.

Bottom Line: It is normal for him to experience some of these urinary symptoms as he ages. However, if he is getting up frequently at night, dribbling on the floor by the toilet, or has symptoms that annoy him and interfere with his quality of life, it is time to consider having him looked at by your friendly urologist to ensure that the symptoms are due to benign prostate enlargement and not other causes, to make sure that no harm has been done to the urinary tract and to offer treatment options.

Wishing you the best of health and a wonderful Thanksgiving weekend,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: available in e-book (Amazon Kindle, Apple iBooks, Barnes & Noble Nook, Kobo) and paperback: www.MalePelvicFitness.com. In the works is The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Co-creator of Private Gym, a comprehensive, interactive, FDA-registered follow-along male pelvic floor muscle training program. Built upon the foundational work of Dr. Arnold Kegel, Private Gym empowers men to increase pelvic floor muscle strength, tone, power, and endurance: www.PrivateGym.com or Amazon.

Of Nighttime Urination, Sleep Disruption and Promiscuous Eating

March 29, 2013

Andrew Siegel, M.D.  Blog #100

Nocturia is a condition in which one awakens from sleep to urinate. Arising once or so to empty one’s bladder during sleep hours is considered normal; however, when it happens multiple times, it can be not only annoying but also sleep-disruptive. It is common in both men and women and increases in prevalence as we age.  It is primarily a kidney-driven urine production problem, as opposed to a bladder-driven urine storage issue.

As with many matters, nocturia is more complicated than it appears and is often multi-factorial.  That stated, it is important to reiterate that the most common underlying cause of nocturia is nocturnal overproduction of urine.  Although most associate the occurrence of nighttime urination with lower urinary tract conditions, in many cases the problem is actually due to the kidneys (upper urinary tract) and not the bladder and prostate (lower urinary tract).  Nighttime urine overproduction, a.k.a. nocturnal polyuria, may result from kidney issues, but also from cardiac or lung conditions. Nocturnal overproduction of urine at night has been implicated as a causal factor in over 80% of cases of nighttime urination.

Nocturia can certainly occur on the basis of lower urinary tract conditions, particularly with benign prostate enlargement or overactive bladder. Under these circumstances, the nocturnal urinary frequency is often on the basis of decreased bladder capacity (in which the bladder is incapable of storing normal volumes) or sometimes because of failure to empty the bladder (in which the bladder is always left partially full).  Additionally, any source of bladder irritation such as an infection, stone, cancer, etc., can irritate the lining of the bladder and cause nighttime urination.   Nocturia can be induced by extrinsic pressure on the bladder, seen with fibroids of the uterus and rectal fullness due to either gas or constipation, although it can be caused by the presence of any pelvic mass. Nocturia can also occur on a neurological basis since neurological diseases such as stroke, spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, etc., can affect urinary frequency during sleep. Even when nocturia is caused primarily by prostate enlargement, overactive bladder, bladder irritation or a neurological issue, etc., nocturnal overproduction can contribute to the process.

Why does nocturnal overproduction of urine occur?  It can result from a number of factors such as the mobilization of excess fluid stored in the lower extremities in people who have peripheral edema. Edema refers to fluid within the tissues–typically the ankles–that tends to accumulate with gravity over the course of the day. Upon assuming the lying-down position when sleeping, the legs are relatively elevated as opposed to standing and this tissue fluid returns into circulation, causing the kidneys to increase urine production.  In general, those with peripheral edema go to sleep with ankles (and perhaps legs) engorged with edema fluid and wake up with thinner legs, as the return of some of the fluid to the circulation and the subsequent increased urination rids them of this. Another underlying cause is excessive production of atrial natriuretic peptide due to sleep apnea or congestive heart failure.  Yet another possibility is an abnormality in the nocturnal secretion of anti-diuretic hormone.  This pituitary hormone functions to cause the kidneys to retain fluid; nocturia may occur because of an age associated decline in its secretion while sleeping. Other factors include excess fluid intake in the evening, especially caffeine-containing beverages, and the use of medications such as diuretics.   Systemic diseases such as diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, and kidney insufficiency, can all cause nocturnal polyuria.

Sometimes nighttime urination occurs not because of any systemic illness or bladder, prostate, kidney or overproduction issue, but simply because of poor sleep. When sleeping poorly, one often gets up to urinate because the wakeful state makes one more conscious of their bladder being full, or alternatively, for an activity to occupy time during the insomnia. Any sleep disorder—insomnia, obstructive sleep apnea, restless leg syndrome, etc.—can result in poor quality sleep and often nocturia. The bladder is a convenient outlet for anxiety, which can induce urinary frequency.

The principal diagnostic tool for assessing nocturia is a voiding diary in which the time and the volume of urination are recorded for a 24-hour period.  There are 4 major findings that may occur: reduced bladder capacity; global polyuria; nocturnal polyuria; or a mixed pattern.  Typical bladder capacity is 10–12 ounces with 4–6 urinations per day. Reduced bladder capacity is a condition in which frequent urination occurs with low bladder capacities, for example, 3–4 ounces per void. Global polyuria is a condition in which bladder volumes are full and appropriate and the frequency occurs both daytime and nighttime. Nocturnal polyuria is nocturnal urinary frequency with full and appropriate volumes, with daytime voiding patterns being normal. A mixed pattern can be a more complex picture involving elements of the other patterns.

If fluid intake is found to be excessive, simple moderation of intake will be helpful, particularly with respect to caffeinated beverages and high fluid content foods such as melons and other fruits. Restricting liquid intake after dinner is often advisable. Minimizing high salt content foods and table salt can help prevent fluid retention. If edema is the issue, compression stockings worn during the day as well as elevating the legs during the day can be of value in getting some of the interstitial fluid out of the system. Diuretics taken during the late afternoon may decrease fluid accumulation.

Medications may be helpful, depending upon the cause of the nocturia.   Synthetic  antidiuretic hormone, aka DDAVP which is useful for childhood bedwetting, can be useful for adults with nocturia associated with nocturnal polyuria. Bladder relaxing medications as well as behavioral techniques and pelvic floor exercises can be beneficial for overactive bladder. Prostate relaxing and shrinking medications or surgical treatment can be helpful if an enlarged prostate is the cause.

Nighttime urination is one of the most annoying and bothersome of urinary symptoms given how sleep-disruptive it often proves to be.  Chronically disturbed sleep can negatively affect one’s quality of life and health.  It can result in daytime fatigue, increased risk of traffic accidents, increased incidents of fall-related nighttime injuries, and weight gain because of altered eating patterns. Insufficient sleep alters our internal biochemical environment and can profoundly disrupt our eating drives leading to patterns of “promiscuous eating.” Clearly, there appears to be a physiological basis for this fatigue-driven eating. Sleep deprivation or the need for sleep results in decreased levels of leptin, our chemical appetite suppressant, and increased levels of ghrelin, our appetite stimulant, in addition to increased levels of cortisol, one of the stress hormones. This sleep-deprived change of our internal chemical milieu can drive our eating. Therein lies the link between urology and nutrition/health/wellness that I am so fond of establishing.

Bottom Line: Nocturnal urinary frequency should be investigated to determine its cause, which may in fact be related to conditions other than urinary tract issues.  Nighttime urination is not only bothersome, but may also pose real health risks. Chronically disturbed sleep can lead to a host of collateral wellness issues.

Andrew Siegel, M.D.

Author of Promiscuous Eating: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food: www.promiscuouseating.com

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