Archive for October, 2018

Big Ball Series: What You Need to Know About Hydroceles

October 27, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD  October 27, 2018

This is the first entry in the “Big Ball” series, which  provides information about common male issues that affect the contents of the scrotum.

 

huge hydrocele

 

Image above, a very large hydrocele

A hydrocele (“hydro” = water + “cele” = sac) is an accumulation of fluid within the sac that surrounds the testicle, resulting in ballooning and enlargement of the scrotum.  It can vary in size from just slightly bigger than the actual testes to larger than a cantaloupe.

Each testicle is surrounded by a thin sac known as the tunica vaginalis. The tunica  has an inner layer and an outer layer, with a small amount of fluid present between these 2 layers that serves a lubrication function, providing the means for the testes to rotate and move freely within the scrotum. The inner layer is responsible for the manufacture of this fluid and the outer layer for its reabsorption. This is a dynamic and ongoing process. A hydrocele is simply a disorder of production/reabsorption such that the outer layer of the tunica is unable to reabsorb all of the fluid that is produced by the inner layer, with the gradual accumulation of a collection of fluid. The fluid content of most hydroceles is straw-colored and odorless.

Hydroceles may also result from trauma, infections, tumors or operations such as a hernia and varicocele repairs. They are evaluated by physical examination and are often further characterized by an ultrasound of the scrotum, allowing for a detailed examination of the underlying testicle that often cannot be provided by physical examination because the size of the hydrocele.

Ultrasonography_of_hydrocele

Ultrasound image, public domain (testes is the ball-like structure that appears gray, hydrocele is the surrounding fluid that appears black)

Most small and moderate size hydroceles that are minimally symptomatic can be managed simply by periodic checkups. If a hydrocele progresses to the point where it causes discomfort, pain, tightness, deformity, or embarrassment, an option is to pass a needle into the hydrocele sac and drain the fluid, but this is most often just a temporary fix, as the root cause is unchanged and the fluid generally will re-accumulate.

The most definitive means of management is a relatively simple outpatient surgical procedure called a “hydrocele repair” or “hydrocelectomy.”  The incision is typically through the midline “seam” of the scrotum; the involved testicle and surrounding hydrocele sac are delivered through the incision, the sac opened, fluid drained and generally the sac is excised and oversewn or alternatively, the opened sac is turned back on itself and sewn to itself.  Either method results in exposing the testes to the scrotal wall (as opposed to the outer layer of the tunica), which functions to resorb the fluid produced by the inner layer of the tunica.  This procedure is a highly successful means of treatment of the hydrocele.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (female version is in the works): PelvicRx

New video on female pelvic floor exercises:  Learn about your pelvic floor

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When He’s Interested and She’s Not: A Common Dilemma of the Aging Couple

October 20, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD   10/20/2018

2018-05-26 16.21.35

Photo taken at Icelandic Phallological Museum, Reykjavik: note that the stallion is braying, stomping and ready in every respect, while the mare seems rather indifferent

This entry is based upon my more than 30 years of experience in the urological “trenches” with innumerable daily interactions with male patients (often accompanied by their spouses). I have observed that much of the time when it comes to sexuality, “men are from Mars and women from Venus.”  I do not intend in any way to be disparaging or offend females, but only to report—as I see it—the not uncommon finding of the discrepant and diverging sexual appetites of the aging male as opposed to the aging female.  When I use the term “aging,” I am not referring only to octogenarians, but also to middle-aged and perhaps even younger couples.

Sex is a vital aspect of human existence—instinctual, hard-wired and a biological imperative. Nature has created the ultimate “bait and switch” in which reproduction (procreation) is linked with a pleasurable physical act (recreation), ensuring mating and, ultimately, perpetuation of the species.

Yet sex is so much more than an act of physical pleasure. For men, it is emblematic of potency, virility, fertility, and masculine identity. For women, it represents femininity, desirability and vitality. For both genders, it is an expression of physical and emotional intimacy, a means of communication and bonding that occurs in the context of skin-to-skin, face-time contact that gives rise to happiness, confidence, self-esteem and quality of life. In addition to sexual health being an important piece of overall health, it also provides comfort, security and ritual that permeate positively into many other areas of our existence. No matter what our chronological age, our need for physical and emotional intimacy never perishes.

Considering that nature’s ultimate purpose of sex is for reproduction, perhaps it is not surprising that when the body is no longer capable of producing offspring, changes occur that affect the anatomy and function of the genital organs.  However, long after the reproductive years are over and parenthood is no longer a consideration, many humans still wish to be able to function sexually.  For men this entails possessing a satisfactory libido (sex drive), the ability to obtain and maintain a reasonably rigid and durable erection, the capacity to ejaculate and experience a climax and, of course, to please their partners.  For women this entails having adequate sexual desire and interest, the ability to become aroused and lubricated, and the capacity to achieve orgasm as well as please their partners.

The aging process can be unkind and Father Time (as well as the ravages of poor lifestyle habits, medical issues and their treatment and other factors) does not spare sexual function.  For men, all aspects of sexuality decline, although sexual interest and drive suffer the least depreciation, leading to men who are eager, but frequently unable to achieve a rigid erection—a frustrating combination.  Age-related changes that affect male sexuality include penile shrinkage, decreased libido, diminished erectile rigidity and durability, more feeble ejaculations (less semen, less force, less arc) and less climactic orgasms.  The male downswing in sexual function usually has a slow and gradual trajectory that is based on many factors, with the progressive decline in testosterone production that occurs with aging (“andropause”) one of the key contributing factors.

For women, all aspects of sexuality decline as well. Age-related changes that affect female sexuality include vaginal and vulval dryness, irritation and thinning, vaginal narrowing and shortening, reduced sex drive, decreased arousal and lubrication, diminished ability to achieve an orgasm and a tendency for painful intercourse. Issues such as urinary incontinence and pelvic organ prolapse can put a further damper on sexual function.  The female downswing in sexual function occurs more precipitously than the male decline—although on the basis of numerous factors, an important one is the cessation of estrogen production by the ovaries that occurs after menopause, typically in the early 50s.

In addition to the physical and hormonal factors that may contribute to decreased sexual activity of the aging couple, there are many other considerations that come into play: After many years of marriage, the novelty factor wears off; priorities change; couples are often busy and fatigued with work, child-rearing and other responsibilities; emergence of urological, gynecological, orthopedic/joint problems, etc., psychological conditions (anxiety, stress and depression having to do with aging, health and other causes); and side effects from medications.   Ultimately, emotional intimacy can become more important to one (or both) partner(s) than physical intimacy.

In the population of patients that I care for (which may be skewed since I am a urologist who often treat men with sexual issues), I have perceived that in general—with exception—the aging male has a more robust sexual desire than his partner.  I have observed many men eager for the possibility of improving erectile function via chemical and other means (Viagra, Cialis, etc.), while his partner does not share his enthusiasm.

In most first marriages (commonly age late 20s to early 30s), men are typically a few years older than the women they marry. However, the older that men are when they marry, the greater the differential in age between them and their spouses, holding true in both first and second marriages. Perhaps age-related diverging sexual desires among males and females are among the factors that may help explain this phenomenon.

So, what to do?

Each partner in a relationship should make an effort to be more understanding of and sympathetic to their partner’s situation and needs and strive to compromise and find middle ground. Psychological counseling may be of great benefit to the couple suffering with the issue of libido imbalance.  Urologists and gynecologists can help male and female patients, respectively, with libido and other issues of sexual dysfunction.

Whereas male sexual dysfunction has received considerable attention and many management options are available, female sexual dysfunction by comparison has received short shrift.  Fortunately, the tides are changing and female sexual dysfunction—paralleling the male situation—has come out of the closet, is the subject of ongoing research and is now a subspecialty of gynecology with numerous management choices available.

Decreased sexual desire in males and females can often be successfully managed with hormone replacement therapy, estrogen and testosterone, respectively, when used in the proper circumstances under medical supervision.  Addyi (Flibanserin)—sometimes referred to as “female Viagra”—is a recently available pill that can effectively manage decreased female sexual desire.  Over the counter lubricants and moisturizers can help manage vaginal dryness and discomfort associated with sexual intercourse. Small amounts of topically applied estrogen or DHEA can be helpful as well. Oral ospemifene (a selective estrogen receptor modulator) may also be used successfully for vaginal dryness and painful intercourse related to menopause.  Fractional carbon dioxide laser treatments applied to the vagina may also prove beneficial when used under the right circumstances.  For the male with erectile dysfunction, there are numerous options to help restore erectile rigidity in the event that the oral pharmaceuticals are ineffective.

Despite the importance of sex, for many couples emotional intimacy can be equally important to, if not more so, than physical intimacy. Furthermore, all forms of sex can be enjoyable and there are numerous ways one can sexually satisfy one’s partner aside from penetrative penile-vaginal intercourse with both partners capable of achieving sexual gratification and climax without the involvement of an erect penis.

Bottom Line: A mismatch in sexual desire is a common issue among partners. Important factors are gradually declining testosterone levels in men and the more sudden decrease in estrogen levels in women.  The recently introduced concept of “couple-pause” is a couple-oriented approach that strives to address the sexual needs of the couple as a whole, rather than an isolated approach to one individual of the pair.  The good news is that disparity of intensity of sexual drive and interest among partners as well as other forms of sexual dysfunction are issues that can be addressed and improved, if not resolved.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health

Cover

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (female version is in the works): PelvicRx

New video on female pelvic floor exercises:  Learn about your pelvic floor

 

Sleep: The (Undeserved) Least Respected Piece of a Healthy Lifestyle

October 13, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD  10/13/2018

DSC00702

Photo above: my two daughters in peaceful repose (quite a few years ago!)

 

Exercise is king. Nutrition is queen. Put them together and you’ve got a kingdom.
Jack Lalanne

In addition to Lalanne’s emphasis on exercise and healthy eating as the key pieces to a healthy lifestyle, modern science supports adequate quality and quantity of sleep as a third component of equal importance.  More than one- third of Americans suffer with chronic sleep deprivation and today’s entry explores the consequences and solutions to  this.

Nature has not intended mankind to work from 8 in the morning to midnight without the refreshment of blessed oblivion which, even if it only lasts 20 minutes, is sufficient to renew all the vital forces.

Winston Churchill

What’s Obvious

That adequate quantity and quality of sleep is vital to our well-being and optimal functioning is readily apparent. We have all enjoyed the blissful experience of a great night’s sleep, awakening well-rested, energetic, optimistic and ready to approach the new day with vigor. Conversely, we have all experienced a poor night’s sleep, awakening feeling physically exhausted, mentally spent, lids heavy, dark circles under our eyes, and often in a disassociated “zombie” state, totally unmotivated and unenthusiastic about facing the new day (a situation not unlike jet lag).

The amount of sleep one needs is biologically determined and different for each person. Some can make do with five hours of sleep while others require ten hours, but as a general rule, seven to eight hours is recommended.  Regardless, sleeping has an essential restorative function as our brains and bodies require this important down time for optimal functioning.

What’s not so obvious

Good quality sleep is an important component of overall health, wellness, and fitness with potential dire consequences to the chronically deprived. Sleep disruption or deprivation has numerous negative mental and physical effects including disturbed cognitive, endocrine, metabolic, cardiovascular, gastrointestinal and immune function. While sleeping, there is an increased rate of anabolism (cellular growth and synthesis) and a decreased rate of catabolism (cellular breakdown), processes that are disrupted by sleep deprivation. Chronic sleep issues can result in making one feel ill and appearing much older than they are chronologically.

Sleep disruption results in decreased levels of leptin (a chemical appetite suppressant), increased ghrelin levels (a chemical appetite stimulant), increased corticosteroids (stress hormones) and increased glucose levels (higher amounts of sugar in the bloodstream). As a result, chronic sleep deprivation commonly gives rise to increased appetite, increased caloric intake and the disassociated “zombie” state lends itself to dysfunctional eating patterns and consumption of unhealthy foods, and as such, weight gain is a predictable consequence.  Compounding the issue, a chronically-fatigued state impairs one’s ability to exercise properly, if at all.

Chronic sleep deficits results in irritability, impaired cognitive function and poor judgment.  The inability to be attentive and focused interferes with work and school performance and causes increased injuries (such as falls) and motor vehicle accidents.

Fact: Shift work sleep disorder.   Non-standard shift workers (health professionals, emergency workers, airline pilots, plant and manufacturing operators, etc.) make up nearly 20% of the U.S. work force. Their irregular working hours are often associated with disturbance of circadian rhythms and resultant insomnia and poor quality and quantity of sleep.  Scientific evidence shows an increased risk of developing diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, cardiovascular disease, peptic ulcer disease and depression.

What to do

The good news is that sleep deprivation is a modifiable risk factor, with a variety of ways to facilitate a good night’s sleep.

Sensible measures to help ensure a good night’s sleep:

  • Lead an active lifestyle with abundant exercise and stimulation.
  • Whether you are an early riser or a night owl, try to be consistent with respect to wake-up and bedtimes on both weekdays and weekends; if these times vary greatly it is a setup for sleep problems by disturbing your internal body clock.
  • Maintain a comfortable sleeping environment—a good quality supportive bed, comfortable pillows, a dark room, cool temperature and, if you like, “white noise” (I find that the monotonous sound of the sea produced by a sound machine, coupled with the gentle whirring of an overhead fan, is an instant relaxer).
  • Avoid caffeinated beverages—coffee, tea, cola, etc.—particularly after 6:00 p.m.  On the other hand, herbal teas, e.g., chamomile, can be soothing and relaxing.
  • Avoid consuming a large meal at dinner or eating very late at night.
  • Avoid imbibing too much alcohol.
  • Avoid exercising late in the evening.
  • Minimize the stress in your life, as much as is conceivable. Engage in a de-stressing activity immediately before sleep—reading, watching a movie or television show, crossword puzzle, sudoku, sex—whatever helps relax you and bring upon sleepiness.
  • Try to minimize evening exposure to the bright light (“blue light”) of cell phones, tablets and computers that inhibits production of the sleep-promoting hormone melatonin, levels of which under normal circumstances rise coincident with darkness. If possible, dim the light settings on electronic devices that are used at night.
  • Supplemental melatonin seems to help some people, but is ineffective for many others (including myself), but may be worth a try 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health

Cover

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (female version is in the works): PelvicRx

New video on female pelvic floor exercises:  Learn about your pelvic floor

 

The “Bialy Diet”

October 6, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD  10/6/2018

Today’s entry is, actually, about a healthy eating lifestyle—as opposed to a diet—that works for me and I promise will help you improve your shape and shred excess pounds. I want to emphasize that this is not a fad pursuit, but a style of eating that can be easily incorporated to replace the typical calorie-rich, nutrient-poor Western diet that is overloaded with highly processed and refined foods, junk and fast foods, contributing to avoidable chronic health problems. As opposed to many weight loss programs that are gimmicky, unbalanced, unhealthy, unsustainable and frankly ridiculous, this approach is a no-nonsense, intelligent one—clean, lean, with plenty of green—that will stave off your hunger and hold caloric intake in balance with expenditure, making it effective and durable.

What do I mean by “bialy diet”?   It is sensible and nutritious eating, substituting less caloric and healthier foods for more caloric and unhealthier alternatives, e.g., bialys instead of bagels.  “Bialy diet’ does not imply eating a bialy at every meal, but is simply code for substituting healthier choices for unhealthier ones!

Bialy diet

A Few Words on Bialys

bialy | bēˈälē | noun (plural bialysUS a flat bread roll topped with chopped onions

The bialy is like the bagel’s older, less famous cousin who gets more handsome the longer you look at him.  –Rebecca Orchant

Who doesn’t love a fresh, warm NY bagel with a smear of cream cheese?  Sadly, the answer is our bodies and our health.  The 360-calorie bagel with two tablespoons of cream cheese (100 calories) is 460 calories of mostly refined carbs and fat. A great alternative is a bialy (“bialystoker kuchen” from Poland where it originated), a delicious flat bread roll that contains no hole, is not over-stuffed and bulging like an overinflated tire and has a depressed middle that is flavored with cooked onions and poppy seeds. The 180-calorie toasted bialy with a teaspoon of light butter with canola oil (20 calories) is only 200 calories and smells and tastes delicious. It is crisp and chewy at the same time, totally satisfying and doesn’t leave you feeling bloated. This with a mug of strong black coffee and half a grapefruit with a few strawberries or blueberries thrown on top of the grapefruit is my typical breakfast.  Sometimes on the weekends I will have an egg white omelet on a bialy with a slices of NJ tomato and avocado, a heavenly treat.

IMG_0573

                               Bialy vs. Bagel

Bialy                          Bagel (plain large)

Calories 180             Calories 360

Total fat 0.5 g           Total fat 2.1 g

Cholesterol 0 mg      Cholesterol 0

Sodium 240 mg        Sodium 700 mg

Total carb 38 g         Total carb 70 g

Fiber 3 g                   Fiber 3

Protein 7g                 Protein 14

In addition to the principle of the Bialy diet—substituting healthier alternatives for unhealthier ones—additional principles of this healthy eating style include Michael Pollen’s philosophy, Mediterranean style eating and the 80/20 strategy.

Michael Pollen’s philosophy can be summed up with his famous seven words: “Eat food, not too much, mostly plants.”  Food translates to real, natural, wholesome and unprocessed nourishment (as opposed to processed, refined, fast foods); not too much obviously means in reasonable quantities (as opposed to consuming massive quantities); and mostly plants emphasizes eating foods grown in the soil– whole grains, vegetables, fruits, legumes, seeds, nuts, etc. (with animal sources in moderation).

Mediterranean style eating is healthy, tasty and filling—and enjoyable.  It emphasizes less meat and more fish, an abundance of vegetables and fruits (rich in biologically active compounds including anti-oxidants, vitamins, minerals and fiber), whole (unrefined) grains, legumes and healthy vegetable fats from olives, avocados, nuts, seeds, etc.  Herbs and spices are used to flavor food, rather than salt. Dairy products are eaten in moderation.

The other element is the 80/20 (or 85/15 or 90/10 or 95/5) strategy.  This means that 80-95% of the time you adhere to a healthy eating style, but 5-20% of the time you give yourself a break, jump off the wagon and indulge in limited amounts of whatever temptation indulgence you would like.  This avoids deprivation and in my opinion is “an inoculation to prevent the disease.”  On the limited list are sweets including cookies, cakes, donuts, candy, etc. and liquid carbohydrates such as sugary drinks including soda, ice tea, lemonade, sports drinks, fruit juices, etc. (The only liquid carbohydrate I consume is alcohol in moderation, wine being a component of the Mediterranean style eating.)

Some Examples of Substitutions

  • Bialys instead of bagels
  • Seafood and lean poultry instead of red meat (when you do eat red meat, consume only the leanest cuts and grass-fed is preferable to corn-fed)
  • Lean turkey meat instead of beef for hamburgers, meatballs, chili, etc.
  • Vegetable protein sources (e.g. legumes—peas, soybeans and lentils) instead of animal protein sources
  • Avocados instead of cheese
  • Olive oil instead of butter
  • Real fruit (e.g. grapes, plums, apricots, figs) instead of dried fruit (raisins, prunes, dried apricots, dried figs) that are energy-dense
  • Real fruit (e.g. orange, grapefruit, apple, etc.) instead of fruit juice (OJ, grapefruit juice, apple juice, etc.) since real fruit has less calories, more fiber and phyto-nutrients and is more filling than the refined juice products
  • Whole grains (e.g. wheat, brown rice, quinoa, couscous, barley, buckwheat, oats, spelt, etc.) instead of refined grain products
  • Tomato sauces instead of cream sauces
  • Vegetable toppings (e.g. broccoli) on pizza instead of meat toppings (pepperoni)
  • Unshelled peanuts instead of processed peanuts (unshelled are usually unprocessed and are difficult to over-consume because of labor-intensity of shelling, the act of which keeps us busy and occupied)
  • Flavored seltzers or sparkling water instead of soda (liquid candy) with its empty calories
  • Baked, broiled, sautéed, steamed, poached or grilled instead of fried, breaded, gooey
  • If you eat chips, baked instead of fried
  • Wild foods instead of farmed (e.g. salmon)
  • Plain Greek yogurt instead of sour cream on baked potatoes and instead of mayo in salad dressings and dips
  • Frozen yogurt bars, which make a delicious 100 calorie or so dessert instead of ice cream
  • Soy, rice, almond or other nut-based milks instead of dairy
  • Low-fat or non-fat dairy products instead of whole milk products

Additional Valuable Nuggets of Advice

  • Pathway to a healthy weight is slow and steady, demanding patience and time
  • Cook healthy meals at home instead of dining out
  • Eat slowly, deliberately and mindfully
  • Eat as if you were dining with your cardiologist and dentist
  • Get sufficient quality and quantity of sleep to help keep the pounds off
  • Avoid late night meals and excessive snacking
  • Eat only when physically hungry with the goal of satiety and not fullness
  • Stay well hydrated as it is easy to confuse hunger with thirst
  • Exercise portion control, especially at restaurants where portions are often supersized
  • Order dressings and sauces on the side to avoid drowning salads and pasta meals in needless calories
  • Do not skip meals
  • Keep healthy foods accessible
  • Perishable food with a limited shelf life is much healthier than a non-perishable item that lasts indefinitely, as do many processed items
  • Read nutritional labels as carefully as if you were reading the label on a bottle of medicine
  • Avoid foods that contain unfamiliar, unpronounceable, or numerous ingredients
  • Avoid foods that make health claims, since real foods do not have to make claims as their wholesomeness is self-evident
  • Avoid food with preservatives, hormones, antibiotics, pesticides, artificial colors, etc.
  • Plants that are naturally colorful are usually extremely healthy
  • “Organic” does not imply healthy or low-calorie
  • Use small plates and bowls to create the illusion of having “more” on your plate
  • Let the last thing you eat before sleep be healthy, natural and wholesome (e.g., a piece of fruit)—you will feel good about yourself when you get into bed and even better in the morning

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

PBOOK002

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

 

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (female version is in the works): PelvicRx

New video on female pelvic floor exercises:  Learn about your pelvic floor