Archive for January, 2018

Viral STI (Sexually Transmitted Infection) Update

January 27, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD   1/27/2018

Sadly, there exist many “creatures” out there that enjoy cohabiting our genitals and bodies. Today’s entry is on the topic of viral STIs– an important subject, since several viral STIs are highly prevalent and many of those who are infected are unaware that they are infected. Viral STIs consist of the four “H’s”: HPV, HIV, herpes and hepatitis as opposed to bacterial STIs (gonorrhea, syphilis, chlamydia), protozoan STIs (trichomoniasis) and other-organism STIs (pubic lice and scabies). This is the 4-H club that you would rather not be a member of. 

Mermin-Quote-Graphic

The format of today’s entry will be a 10-question multiple-choice quiz to test your basic knowledge.  Please try to answer all questions before proceeding to the answers and explanations at the end.

Abbreviation Glossary:

STI: sexually transmitted infections

HAV: hepatitis A virus

HBV: hepatitis B virus

HPV: human papilloma virus

HSV-1: herpes simplex 1

HSV-2: herpes simplex 2

HIV: human immunodeficiency virus

AIDS: acquired immune deficiency syndrome

  1. Which of the following STIs can be prevented by means of vaccination?

a) hepatitis A virus

b) hepatitis B virus

c) human papilloma virus (HPV)

d) all of the above

  1. Natural membrane condoms (lambskins) are effective in preventing STIs.

a) true

b) false

  1. Which of the following is the most common ulcerative STI?

a) genital herpes

b) chancroid

c) syphilis

d) lymphogranuloma venereum

  1. Most genital herpes infections are transmitted by people who are unaware they are infected.

a) true

b) false

  1. What is the most common STI in the United States?

a) chlamydia

b) HPV

c) herpes

d) gonorrhea

  1. Most cases of HPV infections are characterized by which of the following?

a) self-limited

b) asymptomatic

c) unrecognized

d) all of the above

  1.   What areas of the body may HPV infect?

a) genital and anal areas

b) mouth and throat

c) respiratory tract

d) all of the above

  1. Hepatitis B infections can cause which the following problems?

a) permanent liver scarring

b) liver failure

c) liver cancer

d) all of the above

  1. Hepatitis A infections, although usually spread by contaminated food or water can also be spread sexually by the following means:

a) oral-anal contact

b) digital-anal contact

c) penetrative anal sex

d) all of the above

  1. Approximately what percent of persons living with HIV are unaware of their infection?

a) 15%

b) 25%

c) 35%

d) 45%

Answers:

  1. All of the above. There are effective vaccinations available for hepatitis A virus, hepatitis B virus and human papilloma virus (HPV).  These are the only STIs for which vaccination is available for prevention.
  2. False. Natural membrane condoms (lambskins) are NOT effective in preventing STIs. They are made from lamb intestine and have pores that block passage of sperm, but the pores are more than 10 times the diameter of HIV and 25 times the diameter of HBV. Sexual transmission of hepatitis B, HIV and herpes simplex can occur with natural membrane condoms. However, latex condoms are capable of preventing the transmission of these viruses
  3. Genital herpes is the most common STI that can cause ulcerations.  When symptomatic it causes painful, watery blisters that usually erode to form ulcers.
  4. True. Most genital herpes infections are transmitted by people who are unaware that they are infected. In the USA, one in six persons age 15-50 is infected with HSV-2. Most people infected have not been diagnosed and as such, most genital herpes infections are transmitted by people who are unaware they are infected or are asymptomatic. Lesions recur in 80% of those with HSV-2 and 50% of those with HSV-1.
  5. The most common STI in the United States is HPV. The prevalence of genital HPV in adults is approximately 45% in men and 40% in women. All boys and girls 11 to 12 years of age are currently recommended to receive HPV vaccines, prior to the onset of sexual activity and initial exposure to the virus.
  6. All of the above. Most cases of HPV infections are self-limited, asymptomatic and go unrecognized.  When symptomatic, HPV is characterized by genital warts (condyloma) in the anogenital regions.
  7. All of the above. HPV can infect the genital and anal areas, the mouth and throat, and even the respiratory tract.
  8.  All of the above. Hepatitis B infections if left untreated can cause serious liver diseases: permanent liver scarring (cirrhosis), liver failure, liver cancer and death.  HBV is transmitted by exposure to infected blood or body fluids.
  9. All of the above. Hepatitis A infections, although usually spread by contaminated food or water, can also be spread sexually by oral-anal contact, digital-anal contact, and penetrative anal sex. A combined HAV/HBV vaccine is available.
  10. About 15% percent of persons living with HIV are unaware of their infection. It is estimated that in the United States about 1.2 million individuals are living with HIV or acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS). Fortunately, there are effective medications utilized for prevention of HIV infection as well as treatment of HIV infection.  

Bottom Line:  Be smart when choosing your sex partner and practice safe sex. There are many infections that are caused by pathogens (bacteria, viruses, protozoa, etc.) spread person to person by intimate contact. Although some are merely annoying and are easily treated, others can cause significant morbidity; some are associated with the development of cancer, and others, including HIV, are responsible for an epidemic of death. The viral STIs are the 4 “H’s”: HPV (human papilloma virus, responsible for genital warts), HIV (human immunodeficiency virus), hepatitis, and herpes.  Latex condoms are the only widely available proven method for reducing the risk of transmission of HIV and other STIs, but they are certainly not infallible. Strongly consider getting vaccinated to protect against HPV and hepatitis.

Wishing you the best of health!

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (the female version is in the works): PelvicRx

 

 

 

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Preparing For Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT): What You Need To Know (Part 3)

January 20, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD  1/20/18

This entry, written for both women as well as men, is intended to enable one to do a proper contraction of  the pelvic floor muscles (PFM), a task easier said than done.  A means of self-assessment of PFM strength and stamina is offered. 

Image Below: The Pelvic Floor Muscles (Male left; Female right)

1116_Muscle_of_the_Perineum

Attribution: URL: https://cnx.org/contents/FPtK1zmh@8.108:b3YG6PIp@6/Axial-Muscles-of-the-Abdominal
Version 8.25 from the Textbook
OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology
Published May 18, 2016 

Do It Right

PFM exercises (Kegel exercises) must be done properly to reap benefits. Many think they are doing these pelvic contractions correctly, but actually are contracting the wrong muscles, an explanation of why their efforts may have failed to improve their clinical situation. In both women and men, PFM exercises involve pulling inwards and upwards, lifting and elevating.  In females, this will result in tightening the urethral, vaginal and anal openings and in males tightening the anus and if done at the time of an erection, elevating the erect penis.  Proper pelvic contractions are the very opposite of straining. One strains to move their bowels, whereas one “Kegels” to accomplish the opposite—to tighten up the sphincters to NOT move their bowels; in fact, PFM contractions are a means of suppressing bowel urgency (as well as urinary urgency).

How do you know if you are contracting your PFM properly?

For the Ladies: 6 Ways to Know That You Are Properly Contracting Your PFM

  1. When you see the base of your clitoris retract and move inwards towards your pubic bone.
  2. When you see your perineum (area between vagina and anus) move up and in.
  3. When you see the anus contract (“anal wink”) and feel it tighten and pull up and in.
  4. When you can stop your urinary stream completely.
  5. When you place your index and middle fingers on your perineum and you feel the contraction.
  6. When you place a finger in your vagina, you feel the vaginal “grip” tighten.

 

 

For the Gentlemen: 6 Ways to Know That You Are Properly Contracting Your PFM

  1. When you see the base of your penis retract inwards towards the pubic bone and the testes rise up towards the groin.
  2. When you place your index and middle fingers in the midline between the scrotum and anus and you feel the PFM contractions.
  3. When you see the anus contract (“anal wink”) and feel it tighten and pull up and in.
  4. When you get the same feeling as you do when you are ejaculating.
  5. When you touch your erect penis and feel the penile erectile chambers surge with blood and you can make the penis lift upwards when you are in the standing position.
  6. When you can stop your urinary stream completely.

Fact:  Vince Lombardi stated: “Practice doesn’t make perfect, perfect practice makes perfect.”  This is wholly applicable to PFM training. Do it right or don’t do it!

Assessing Your PFM: Note that this is used primarily for women

There are many fancy ways of testing your PFM, but the simplest is by using tools that everyone owns—their fingers.  Digital palpation (a finger in the vagina, or alternatively the anal canal) is the standard means of testing the contraction strength of the PFM. The other methods are visual inspection, electromyography (measuring electrical activity of the PFM), perineometry (measuring PFM contractile strength via a device that is inserted into the vagina or anus) and imaging tests that assess the lifting aspects of the PFM, such as ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging.

Assessment of your PFM evaluates PFM strength and endurance.  PFM strength can be self-assessed in the supine position (lying down, face up) with your knees bent and parted. Gently place a lubricated finger of one hand in the vagina (or alternatively the anal canal) and contract your PFM, lifting upwards and inwards and squeezing around the finger. Keep your buttocks down in contact with the surface you are lying on. Ensure that you are not contracting your gluteal (butt), rectus (abdomen) or adductor (inner thigh) muscles. Do this by placing your other hand on each of these other muscle groups, in turn, to prove to yourself that these muscles remain relaxed during the PFM contraction.

Rate your PFM strength using the modified Oxford grading scale, giving yourself a grade ranging from 0-5.  Note that the Oxford system is what many physicians use and it is relatively simple when done regularly by those who are experienced performing pelvic exams. Granted that this is not your area of expertise, so you may find this challenging. However, do your best to get a general sense of your baseline PFM strength.

Oxford Grading of PFM Strength

0—complete lack of contraction

1—minor flicker

2—weak squeeze

3—moderate squeeze

4—good squeeze

5—strong squeeze

Next test your PFM endurance. Do as many PFM contractions as possible, pulsing the PFM rapidly until fatigue sets in (the failure point where you cannot do any more contractions).  After you have recovered, contract the PFM for several seconds followed by relaxing them for several seconds, doing as many repetitions until fatigue occurs. Finally, do a single PFM contraction and hold it for as long as you can.

Record your Oxford grade and the maximum number of pulses, maximum number of several second contractions and the duration of the sustained hold as baseline measurements. These will be useful to help assess your progress. Initially, it is likely that your PFM will be weak and lack endurance capacity.

Coming soon…The Nuts and Bolts of Pelvic Floor Muscle Training.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following pelvic floor health books that are available on Amazon, Apple iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

 MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

 

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (female version is in the works): PelvicRx

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing For Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT): What You Need To Know (Part 2)

January 13, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD    1/13/2018

This entry, written for both males and females, will help you develop pelvic floor muscle (PFM) awareness and build PFM muscle memory.  

Image below: Male PFM (left); Female PFM (right)

 

1116_Muscle_of_the_Perineum

Attribution: URL: https://cnx.org/contents/FPtK1zmh@8.108:b3YG6PIp@6/Axial-Muscles-of-the-Abdominal
Version 8.25 from the Textbook
OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology
Published May 18, 2016

PFM Education and Awareness

Fact: Studies have clearly shown that most women with pelvic issues referred for PFM training are unable to perform a proper PFM contraction. Almost all demonstrate weak PFM strength regardless of age, ethnicity or diagnosis. Most males are clueless about PFM training, many not even realizing that they have this set of important muscles. 

Physical therapists and physical medicine and rehabilitation experts have used functional restoration to effectively manage injured skeletal muscles. This strategy can likewise be applied to weakened and poorly functional PFM. The principles involve segregation, guidance and progression.  Segregation is an awareness of PFM anatomy and function with the ability to isolate the PFM by contracting them independently of other muscles. Guidance refers to the instructions necessary to learn how to properly engage and train the PFM.  Progression refers to the incrementally more challenging exercises over the course of the PFM training regimen that result in PFM growth and improvement.  Again, exercise is about adaptation, so increasing repetitions and intensity is mandatory to achieve results. The goal is for fit PFM—strong, yet flexible, equally capable of powerful contractions as well as full relaxation.

Initially, one must become aware and mindful of the presence, location and nature of the PFM.  A good starting point is what the PFM are not: they are NOT the muscles of the abdomen, thighs or buttocks, but are the saddle of muscles that run from the pubic bone in front to the tailbone in back.

The PFM have a resting tone, even though you are not typically aware of it. They can be contracted and relaxed at will: a voluntary contraction of the PFM will enable interruption of the urinary stream and tightening of the anal canal and an involuntary (reflex) contraction of the PFM occurs, for example, at the time of a cough. Relaxation of the PFM occurs during urination or a bowel movement.

Dr. Arnold Kegel described a PFM contraction as “a squeeze around the pelvic opening with an inward lift.” With a proper PFM contraction, the perineum (the area between vagina and anus in females and scrotum and anus in males) pulls in and lifts in an upwards direction.  This is a “drawing in and up,” which is the very opposite feeling of “bearing down” to move one’s bowels.  For females, one method of getting the feel for doing a proper PFM contraction is to initially tighten the vagina, secondly the anus, and thirdly lift up the perineum.

Fact: Kay Crotty, a pelvic floor physiotherapist in the UK, feels that it is initially easier to learn to contract your PFM by concentrating on just the back PFM (anal sphincter).  She discovered that women who tighten their PFM while focused on both the front PFM (vaginal) and back PFM do better quality PFM contractions than those who tighten their PFM focused on just the front PFM. 

There are many mental images that can be useful in understanding PFM contractions. One is to think of the pubic bone and tailbone moving towards each other. Another helpful picture is to imagine the PFM as an elevator—when the PFM are engaged, the elevator rises upwards to the first floor from the ground floor; with continued training, the elevator rises to the second floor.  Alternatively, for females, envision that you are lifting a ping pong ball with your vagina and pulling it deep inside you. Another means is to mentally visualize that you are removing a tampon from your vagina and as you pull on the string you try to resist and hold the tampon in.

There are simple “biofeedback” techniques that can be helpful as well. After emptying your bladder about halfway, try to interrupt your urinary stream for a few seconds while you focus on the PFM that allow you to do so. Then resume and complete urination.  The feeling should be that of clenching and unclenching the vagina, urethra and anus in females and the anus and urethra in males.  Another method for females is to place a finger in your vagina and contract your PFM: the feeling should be of your vagina having a firm grip around your finger; alternatively, in either gender one can place a finger in the anus and when the PFM are contracted, the feeling should be of the anus having a firm grip around your finger.

Building Muscle Memory

It is important to understand how one becomes adept at using muscles.  This is relevant to gaining competence in any new physical activity and will be applied specifically to acquiring the skills to perform well-executed PFM contractions.

There are four stages of motor learning.  (I learned this as it pertained to the mechanics of a golf swing, but it is equally relevant to mastering contracting the PFM.)

Stage 1. Unconscious/incompetent

There is no awareness of the motion and it cannot be capably performed. It is challenging to make the connection between your brain and your PFM because the PFM under most circumstances are used involuntarily (without conscious awareness). This connection is not intuitive and must be taught.

Fact: The connections between brain and PFM consist of sensory and motor nerves. The PFM contain sensors known as “proprioceptors” that detect stretch, position and motion and convey this information to the brain via sensory nerves. Motor nerves originate in the brain and enable the PFM to contract.

Stage 2. Conscious/incompetent

Awareness of the motion is learned, but the motion cannot be competently performed.

Stage 3. Conscious/competent

Awareness of the motion is established and with sufficient practice the motion can be competently performed.

Stage 4. Unconscious/competent

With continued practice, the brain-PFM connection and muscle memory become well established and the motion can be performed reflexively (without conscious thought or effort).

…To be continued next week with a discussion on the execution of a proper PFM contraction and self-assessment of  your PFM strength and stamina.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, Apple iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

 MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (female version is in the works): PelvicRx

 

 

 

 

 

Preparing For Pelvic Floor Muscle Training (PFMT): What You Need To Know

January 6, 2018

Andrew Siegel MD  1/6/2017

Happy New Year!  At this time, many of us are trying to execute New Year’s resolutions.  Topping the list of most resolutions is getting into good physical shape.  A vital piece of this is pelvic floor fitness; in fact, pelvic floor muscle training was among the top five exercises recommended for general health and fitness in a recent Harvard Medical School report.

The next series of blog entries, written for both men and women, will enable you to achieve pelvic floor fitness.  Remember, Kegels are not just for the ladies!  This first entry discusses the fast and slow twitch muscle fibers that determine pelvic floor muscle (PFM) function, the adaptation principle and the distinction between strength, power and stability.  

Image below: Male PFM (left) and female PFM (right); notice their similarity.

1116_Muscle_of_the_PerineumAttribution: URL: https://cnx.org/contents/FPtK1zmh@8.108:b3YG6PIp@6/Axial-Muscles-of-the-Abdominal  Version 8.25 from the Textbook, OpenStax Anatomy and Physiology, 
Published May 18, 2016

Muscles 101

Muscles provide shape to our bodies and allow for movement, stability and maintenance of posture.  Most skeletal muscles come in pairs and cross bony joints—when one group contracts, it causes bending of that joint and when the opposing group contracts, it causes straightening of that joint (e.g., biceps/triceps).  When each contract equally, the joint is in a neutral position. The human body has three types of muscles—skeletal muscles that provide mobility and stability, smooth muscles that line the arteries, bladder, intestine, etc., and the unique cardiac muscle of the heart.  Muscles are composed of fibers that contract (shorten and tighten) and relax (lengthen and loosen).

The PFM are skeletal muscles that are comprised of fast twitch and slow twitch muscle fibers. Fast twitch fibers predominate in high contractile muscles that fatigue rapidly and are used for fast-paced muscle action, e.g., sprinting.  Slow twitch fibers predominate in endurance muscles, e.g., marathon running. The PFM have a constant tone (low level of involuntary contraction) because of the presence of slow twitch fibers. The fast twitch fibers allow for voluntary contraction. The PFM fibers are 70% slow twitch, fatigue-resistant, endurance muscles to maintain constant muscle tone (e.g., sphincter function and pelvic support) and 30% fast twitch, capable of rapid and powerful contractions (e.g., sexual climax, interrupting the urinary stream and tightening the anus).

Fact:  Aging causes a decline in the function of the fast twitch fibers, but tends to spare the slow twitch fibers.   

Muscle mass is in a dynamic state, a constant balance between growth and breakdown. With aging, muscle fiber wasting occurs as muscle breakdown exceeds muscle growth, adversely affecting function. Strength training reduces muscle wasting by increasing muscle bulk through enlargement of muscle fibers. This is true of all skeletal muscles, the PFM being no exception.

Adaptation Principle

Muscles are remarkably responsive to the stresses placed upon them.  Muscle growth only occurs in the presence of progressive overload, which causes compensatory structural and functional changes, a.k.a. adaptation. This explains why exercises get progressively easier in proportion to the effort put into doing them.  As muscles adapt to the stresses placed upon them, a “new normal” level of fitness is achieved.  Another term for adaptation is plasticity. Skeletal muscles are “plastic,” capable of growth or shrinkage depending on the environment to which they are exposed.

The PFM behave similarly to other skeletal muscles in terms of their response to exercise or lack thereof.  In accordance with the adaptation principle, it is advisable to increase number of repetitions and contraction intensity to build muscle PFM strength, power and endurance.  As much as our muscles adapt positively to resistance, so they will adapt to the absence of stress and resistance, resulting in smaller, weaker and less durable muscles.

Fact: Use It or Lose It. With a conditioning regimen, the PFM will thrive, optimizing their function.  When the PFM are neglected, they will weaken, impairing their function.   

Strength, Power and Stability

The goal of PFM training is to maximize the trio of PFM strength, power and stability. Strength is the maximum amount of force that a muscle can exert. With time and effort, PFM contractions become more robust, helping sexual function and improving one’s ability to neutralize stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder and pelvic organ prolapse in females.  In males, command of one’s pelvic floor muscles can improve sexual, urinary and prostate health.  Power is a gauge of strength and speed (muscle force multiplied by the contraction speed), a measure of how rapidly strength can be expressed, of great benefit to sexual health and the ability to react rapidly to urinary/bowel urgency and stress urinary incontinence. Stability helps maintain vaginal tone, urinary and bowel sphincter function and pelvic organ support as well as contributing to the “backboard” that helps prevent stress urinary incontinence.

To be continued… Next week’s entry provides information on the process of building muscle PFM memory and how to develop PFM awareness.

Wishing you the best of health!

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

 MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

Dr. Siegel is co-creator of the male pelvic floor exercise instructional DVD (female version is in the works): PelvicRx