Archive for October, 2017

How Much Water Do You Really Need To Drink?

October 28, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   10/28/17

drinking-water-filter-singapore-1235578_640

Thank you Pixabay for above image

Many sources of information (mostly non-medical and of dubious reliability) dogmatically assert that humans need 8-12 glasses of water daily to stay hydrated and thrive. Today’s entry addresses the question of how much water you really need to drink in order to stay healthy.

Fact: Many take the 8-12 glass/day rule literally and as a result end up in urologists’ offices complaining of urinary urgency, frequency and often leakage. Clearly, the 8-12 rule is not appropriate for everyone! The truth of the matter is that although some urinary issues are brought on or worsened by insufficient fluid intake, including kidney stones and urinary infections, other urinary woes are brought on or worsened by excessive fluid intake, including the aforementioned “overactive bladder” symptoms.

Fact: Many foods have high water content and can be a significant source of water intake. In general, the healthier the diet (the more the fruit and veggie intake) the higher amount of dietary water.  For example, melons, citrus fruit, peaches, strawberries and raspberries are about 90% water, with most fruits over 80% water.  The same holds true for vegetables, with lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, celery, radishes and zucchini comprised of about 95% of water, with most veggies over 85% water.

Water is a vitally important component of our bodies, promoting optimal organ and cellular functioning, temperature regulation, nutrient and waste transportation, joint lubrication,  and facilitating the thousands of chemical reactions occurring within our bodies. 60% of our body weight is water, two-thirds of which is within our cells and one-third of which is in blood and tissues between cells. For a 165 lb. man, that translates to 100 lb. of water weight. For a 125 lb. woman, that translates to 75 lb. of water weight.

Our body needs water “equilibrium,” with water intake balancing water losses.  Most people need a total of 65-80 ounces daily, although this can vary greatly depending upon one’s size, the ambient temperature and level of physical activity.  Again, water intake comes from beverages and foods consumed, with many foods containing a great deal of water, particularly fruits and vegetables as mentioned, so the 65-80 ounces includes this source. Water losses are “sensible,” consisting of water in the urine and stool, and “insensible,” from skin (evaporation and sweating) and lungs (moisture exhaled).

The formula that doctors use for figuring out daily fluid requirements—especially useful for hospitalized patients not eating or drinking who depend totally on intravenous fluids—is 1500cc (50 ounces) for the first 20 kg (44 lb.) of weight, and an additional 200cc (7 ounces) for each additional 10 kg (22 lb.) of weight.  So, for a 125 lb. woman the daily fluid requirement is 2250 cc (75 ounces).  For a 165 lb. man, the daily requirement is 2600 cc (87 ounces).  It is important to understand that the 75 ounces of fluid requirement for the woman and the 87 ounce fluid requirement for the man in this example includes both beverages and food. If one has a very healthy diet with lots of fruits and vegetables, there will obviously be less need for drinking water and other beverages.

Fact: Caffeinated beverages (coffee, tea, colas, many energy and sports drinks and other sodas) as well as alcohol both have diuretic effects, causing you to urinate more volume than you take in. So, if you consume caffeine or alcohol, you will end up needing additional hydration to maintain equilibrium.

The other important factors with respect to water needs are ambient temperature and activity level. If you are reading or doing other sedentary activities in a cool room, your water requirements are significantly less than someone exercising vigorously in 90-degree temperatures.

Humans are extraordinarily sophisticated and well-engineered “machines.”  Your body lets you know when you are hungry, ill, sleepy and thirsty.  Paying attention to your thirst is one of the best ways of maintaining good hydration status.  Another great method is to pay attention to your urine color.  Depending on your hydration status, urine color can vary from deep amber to as clear as water.  If your urine is dark amber, you need to drink more as a lighter color is ideal and indicative of satisfactory hydration.

Some advantages of staying well-hydrated:

  • Avoids dehydration and all its consequences (this is pretty obvious)
  • Dilution of urine helps prevent kidney stones
  • Dilution of urine helps prevent urinary infections
  • Helps bowel regularity
  • Maintains hydrated and supple, less wrinkled skin
  • Helps keep weight down because of the filling effect of drinking; also, thirst can be confused with hunger and some people end up eating when they should be hydrating

Disadvantages:

  • Makes you urinate a lot, which is not good for those with overactive bladder symptoms

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

 MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

 

 

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5 Kegel Exercise Mistakes You Are Probably Making

October 21, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD 10/21/17

Do it right or don't do it

I have always been fond of this sentiment, the words of which were immortalized for me on a coffee mug courtesy of then 10-year-old Jeff Siegel (my son).  This statement holds true for everything in life, including pelvic floor exercises. 

Dr. Arnold Kegel (1894-1981), a gynecologist who taught at USC School of Medicine,  popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises to improve the sexual and urinary health of women following childbirth. His legacy is the pelvic exercise that bears his name—Kegels.

“Do your Kegels” is common advice from many a gynecologist (and from well-intentioned friends and family), particularly after a difficult childbirth has caused problems “down there.”  These pelvic issues include urinary leakage, drooping bladder, and stretching of the vagina such that things look and feel different and sex is just not the same.

“Do your Kegels” is sensible advice since this strengthens the pelvic floor muscles that support the pelvic organs, contribute to urinary and bowel control, and are intimately involved with sexual function. Developing strong and durable pelvic floor muscles is capable of improving, if not curing, these pelvic issues. Unfortunately, mastery of the pelvic floor is not as easy as it sounds because these muscles are internal and hidden and most often used subconsciously (unlike the external glamour muscles that are external and visible and used consciously).  

  The Kegel problem is threefold:

  1. Many women do not know how to do a proper Kegel contraction.
  2. Of those that can do a proper Kegel contraction, most do not pursue a Kegel exercise training program.
  3. Even those women who do know how to do a proper Kegel contraction and pursue a Kegel exercise training program are rarely, if ever, taught the most important aspect of pelvic muscle proficiency: how to put the Kegels to practical use in real-life situations  (“Kegels-on-demand”).

If a Kegel pelvic floor contraction is done incorrectly, not only will the pelvic issue not be helped, but actually could made worse. Only doing pelvic muscle contractions without pursuing a well-designed pelvic floor muscle training program is often an invitation to failure. Finally, if “Kegels-on-demand” to improve pelvic issues are not taught, it is virtually pointless to learn a proper contraction and complete a program, since the ultimate goal is the integration of Kegels into one’s daily life to improve quality. 

How does one do a proper Kegel pelvic contraction?  Simply stated, a Kegel is an isolated contraction of the pelvic floor muscles that draw in and lift the perineum (the region between vagina and anus). The feeling should be of this anatomical sector moving “up” and “in.”

5 Common Kegel Exercise Mistakes

Mistake # 1: Holding Your Breath

Breathe normally.  The Kegel muscles are the floor of the core group of muscles, a barrel of central muscles that consist of the diaphragm on top, the pelvic floor on the bottom, the abds in front and on the sides, and the spinal muscles in the back. Holding your breath pushes the diaphragm muscle down and increases intra-abdominal pressure, which pushes the pelvic floor muscles down, just the opposite direction you want them moving.

Mistake # 2: Contracting the Wrong Muscles

When I ask patients to squeeze their pelvic floor muscles during a pelvic exam, they often contract the wrong muscles, usually the abdominals, buttocks or thigh muscles. Tightening up the glutes is not a Kegel!  Others squeeze their legs together, contracting their thigh muscles.  Still others lift their butts in the air, a yoga and Pilates position called “bridge.” The worst mistake is straining and pushing down as if moving one’s bowels, just the opposite of a Kegel which should cause an inward and upward lift.

Fact: I have found that even health care personnel—those “in the know,” including physical therapists, personal trainers and nurses—have difficulty becoming adept at doing Kegels. 

Sadly, there is a device on the market (see below) called the “Kegel Pelvic Muscle Thigh Exerciser,” a Y-shaped plastic device that fits between your inner thighs such that when you squeeze your thighs together, the gadget squeezes closed. This exerciser has NOTHING to do with pelvic floor muscles (as it strengthens the adductor muscles of the thigh), serving only to reinforce doing the wrong exercise and it is shameful that the manufacturer mentions the terms “Kegel” and “pelvic muscle” in the description of this product.

kegeler

Learning to master one’s pelvic floor muscles requires an education on the details and specifics of the pelvic floor muscles, learning the proper techniques of conditioning them and finally, the practical application of the exercises to one’s specific issues.

Mistake # 3: Not Using a Kegel Program

Kegel exercises can potentially address many different pelvic problems—pelvic organ prolapse, sexual issues, stress urinary incontinence, overactive bladder/bowel, and pelvic pain due to excessive pelvic muscle tension.  Each of these issues has unique pelvic floor muscle shortcomings.  Doing casual pelvic exercises does not compare to a program, which is a home-based, progressive, strength, power and endurance training regimen that is designed, tailored and customized for the specific pelvic floor problem at hand. Only by engaging in such a program will one be enabled to master pelvic fitness and optimize pelvic support and sexual, urinary and bowel function.

Mistake # 4: Impatience

Transformation does not occur overnight!  Like other exercise programs, Kegels are a “slow fix.”  In our instant gratification world, many are not motivated or enthused about slow fixes and the investment of time and effort required of an exercise program, which lacks the sizzle and quick fix of pharmaceuticals or surgery. Realistically, it can take 6 weeks or more before you notice improvement, and after you do notice improvement, a “maintenance” Kegel training regimen needs to be continued (use it or lose it!)

Mistake # 5: Not Training for Function (“Kegels-on-Demand”)

Sadly, most women who pursue pelvic training do not understand how to put their newfound knowledge and skills to real life use. The ultimate goal of Kegels is achieving functional pelvic fitness, applying one’s pelvic proficiency to daily tasks and common everyday activities so as to improve one’s quality of life.  It is vital, of course, to begin with static and isolated, “out of context” exercises, but eventually one needs to learn to integrate the exercises on an on-demand basis (putting them in to “context”) so as to improve leakage, bladder and pelvic organ descent, sexual function, etc.

Bottom Line: Kegel pelvic floor muscle exercises are a vastly under-exploited and misunderstood resource, despite great potential benefits of conditioning these small muscles.  In addition to improving a variety of pelvic issues (urinary and bowel leakage, sexual issues, dropped bladder, etc.), a strong and fit pelvic floor helps one prepare for pregnancy, childbirth, aging and high impact sports.  The Kegel Fix book is a wonderful resource that teaches the reader how to do proper Kegels, provides specific programs for each unique pelvic issue, and reveals the specifics of “Kegels-on-demand,” how to put one’s fit pelvic floor and contraction proficiency to practical use in the real world.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted weekly. To receive a free subscription with delivery to your email inbox visit the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a physician and urological surgeon who is board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  He is an Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community.

Dr. Siegel has authored the following books that are available on Amazon, iBooks, Nook and Kobo:

 MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

PROMISCUOUS EATING: Understanding and Ending Our Self-Destructive Relationship with Food

Cover

These books are written for educated and discerning men and women who care about health, well-being, fitness and nutrition and enjoy feeling confident and strong.

 

 

10 Common Penile “Flaws” You May Have That Are Actually Quite Normal

October 14, 2017

 Andrew Siegel MD   10/14/17

A penis is a special organ—a man’s joy, if not pride—and certainly one of his most prized, appreciated and cherished possessions, to which he has a significant attachment. As multifunctional as a Swiss Army knife, it allows him to stand to urinate (an undervalued capability), rises and firms to the occasion to allow for sexual penetration, and ejaculates genetic material–the means to perpetuate the species. A marvel of hydraulic engineering, within nanoseconds of sexual stimulation it is uniquely capable of increasing its blood flow 50 times over baseline, transforming its shape and size. Penis magic!

Each and every penis is unique.  As variable as snowflakes, they come in every size, shape and color. Beyond “size matters”—often a source of male preoccupation—men are often obsessed, if not preoccupied, with the appearance of their genitals.  In my interactions with patients, concerns are often voiced about symmetry, color, pigmentation, angulation, spots, blemishes, vein patterns, shrinkage and other oddities. Unless you are in the habit of closely inspecting other men’s genitals (as urologists are), you are unlikely to realize how common and completely normal most of these genital variations are.

 10 Common Penile “Flaws” You May Have That Are Actually Quite Normal

  1. Penis leans to one side

left or right

No human is perfectly symmetrical and the flaccid penis rarely hangs perfectly centered. Wherever your penis naturally lies when you are clothed—whether left or right—is not indicative of your political leaning or left vs. right-sided brain predominance and is of absolutely no significance or consequence whatsoever!

Interesting trivia: “Throckmorton’s sign” is a term used jokingly by medical students, residents and attending physicians. A positive Throckmorton sign is when the penis points to the side of the body where the pathology is, e.g., if a man is getting surgery for a right groin hernia and the penis points to the right side. The Throckmorton sign indicates the proper side of the pathology at least 50% of the time!  Operating room humor! 

  1. Slight penile curvature when erect

pixabay banana

Thank you Pixabay, for image above

Again, although perfect symmetry may be desirable, the norm for the erect penis is not to be perfectly straight. There is often a subtle bend to the left, right, up or down.  Some men have a penis that has a banana-like curvature. Slight bends—considered totally normal—are to be distinguished from Peyronie’s disease, a condition in which there is significant angulation due to scarring of the sheaths of the erectile chambers. It is a potentially serious condition that can cause painful erections and erectile dysfunction.

  1. One testicle hangs lower

pixabay plumsThank you Pixabay, for image above

If you ever wondered why one of your testes is slightly bigger or heavier and hangs lower than the testes on the other side, you are in good company. Paralleling women with breast asymmetry, the vast majority of men have testes asymmetry, so your mismatched gonads are perfectly normal.

  1. Dark genital skin

Hyperpigmentation (darkening) of the median raphe (the line running from anus to perineum to scrotum to undersurface of penis) and other areas of the penis is extremely common.  In fact, it is normal for the penile skin color to be darker than other areas of the body, because of the effect of sex hormones on the cells that produce pigment (melanocytes).  The circumcision line, as well, is often deeply pigmented.

  1. Freckles, moles and skin tags

pixabay spottedThank you Pixabay, for image above

The penis is covered by skin–just like the rest of the body–and is therefore subject to common benign skin growths, including moles, freckles and skin tags. These are generally harmless and usually do not require any treatment unless desired for cosmetic reasons. However, if you have a growth that changes in size, color or texture, you should have it checked out because penile cancers do occur on occasion.  Skin tags are small fleshy protuberances and can be confused with genital warts, so if you have any doubt, get checked.

  1. Other penis and scrotal bumps and lumps

Pearly penile papules are raised “pearly” bumps that appear around the corona (the base of the head of the penis). They consist of one or more rows of small, fleshy, yellow-pink or transparent, smooth bumps surrounding the penile head. They are benign and do not cause harm, but sometimes are treated for cosmetic reasons, usually with freezing or lasering.

Pearly_Penile_Papules_Front

Pearly penile papules, By AndyRich48 (Own work) [CC BY-SA 4.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

Sebaceous glands produce oil that nourishes the hair follicles of the genitals. These glands appear as numerous small yellowish bumps on the scrotum and penile base.  In some men, they are prominent and referred to as sebaceous gland hyperplasia.  At times, they can exist without a hair follicle even being present.  Regardless, they are a normal occurrence.  See public domain image below–a.k.a. Fordyce spots.

Fordyces_spot_closeup.public domain. jpg

  1. Scattered scrotal spots

Angiokeratomas are benign purplish skin growths with a scaly surface that are not uncommonly present on the scrotum. They consist of dilated thin-walled blood vessels with overlying skin thickening. These skin lesions can occasionally bleed and also cause fear and anxiety since they can resemble more serious problems such as melanoma. If in any doubt, get it checked out.

Angiokeratoma_of_the_Scrotum_5

Scrotal angiokeratomas, By Jlcarter2 (Own work) [GFDL (http://www.gnu.org/copyleft/fdl.html) or   CC BY-SA 3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)%5D, via Wikimedia Commons

  1. Veiny vanity

Every man has a unique penile venous pattern, the anatomy as unpredictable as the distinctive venous anatomy of the hand and wrist. In some men, the veins are twisted and prominent and in other men they are barely noticeable.  No matter what the pattern, venous anatomy is highly variable and individualized and is normal.

  1. Loose skin

Unlike most other skin on the body that is more tightly attached, penile skin is loosely attached to underlying tissues, allowing for expansion with erections. Since the physical state of the penis can vary from totally flaccid to totally rigid, when the penis is fully deflated, the skin may appear to be somewhat floppy and redundant, which is absolutely normal.  Scrotal skin often becomes increasing lax with the aging process, such that the testicles typically hang quite low in the elderly male, paralleling the common situation of pendulous breasts of the elderly female.

10. Shrinkage

Penile size in an individual is quite variable, based upon penile blood flow. The more blood flow, the more tumescence (swelling); the less blood flow, the less tumescence. “Shrinkage” can be provoked by exposure to cold (weather or water), the state of being anxious or nervous, and participation in sports. The mechanism in all cases involves temporary reduced blood circulation.  Don’t worry, that sorry and spent looking penis can magically be revived with some TLC!

Bottom line: If you have an imperfect penis…welcome to the club!  No penis or scrotum is perfect.  Far from being an object of beauty, genital imperfections are the norm, so there is no need for feeling self-conscious. Just be happy that your little “fella” can function properly and enjoy his own happiness from time to time! Function over form!

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

 

Kegels: One Size Does Not Fit All!

October 7, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   10/7/17

shutterstock_femalebluepelvic

Athletes use a variety of fitness and strength-training programs to maximize their strength and endurance. A one-size-fits-all approach—the same exercise regimen applied to all—is clearly not advantageous because of the varying functional requirements for different sports.  Specific, targeted and individualized exercise programs are used to enhance and optimize performance, depending upon the particular sport and individual athlete. The ultimate goal of training is “functional fitness,” the achievement of strength, power, stamina and the skill set to improve performance and prevent specific functional impairments (injuries).

Pelvic floor dysfunction is a broad term applied to the scenario when the pelvic muscles and connective tissues are no longer functioning optimally.  This gives rise to pelvic issues including pelvic organ prolapse, urinary and bowel incontinence, sexual dysfunction and pelvic pain syndromes.  A one-size-fits-all Kegel pelvic floor muscle exercise approach has traditionally been used to manage all forms of pelvic floor dysfunctions. For many years, patients who were thought to be able to benefit from Kegels were handed a brochure with instructions to do 10 repetitions of a 10-second Kegel contraction followed by 10 rapid contractions, three times daily.

Are their shortcomings with this one-size-fits-all approach?  Clearly, the answer is yes. A one-size-fits-all approach lacks the nuance necessary to properly tackle the different types of pelvic floor dysfunction. Aligning the pelvic floor dysfunction with the appropriately tailored training program that focuses on improving the area of weakness is vitally important, since each pelvic floor dysfunction is associated with unique and specific deficits in pelvic muscle strength, power and/or endurance. One size does not fit all!

After decades of “stagnancy” following the 1940s transformative work of Dr. Arnold Kegel—the physician who was singularly responsible for popularizing pelvic floor exercises in women after childbirth–there has been a resurgence of interest in pelvic floor training. I am humbled and honored to have contributed to this “pelvic renaissance” with the publication of the short paperback book The Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health, which introduces home-based, progressive, tailored exercises consisting of strength, power and endurance pelvic training regimens customized for each specific pelvic floor problem.

The initial goal of pelvic floor muscle training is muscle adaptation, the process by which pelvic muscle growth occurs in response to the demands placed it, with adaptive changes occurring in proportion to the effort put into the exercises. More challenging exercises are needed over time in order to continue the growth process that occurs as “new normal” levels of pelvic fitness are established. This translates into slowly and gradually increasing contraction intensity, duration of contractions, number of repetitions and number of sets.  The “plasticity” of the pelvic muscles require continued training, at minimum a “maintenance” program after completion of a course of pelvic training.

Although the short-term goal of pelvic floor muscle training is adaptation, the long-term goal is the achievement of functional pelvic fitness.  The vast majority of women who are taught Kegel exercises are not instructed how to put them into practical use. Go figure!  This concept of functional pelvic fitness is the actionable means of applying pelvic conditioning to daily tasks and real-life common activities. This is the essence of Kegel pelvic floor training—not simply to condition the pelvic floor muscles, but to apply this conditioning and proficiency in such a way and at the appropriate times so as to improve quality of one’s life.   These Kegels-on-demand—as I refer to them—can be lifesavers and quite a different take on Kegels, as opposed to static, isolated, out of context exercises.

Important Nuances and Details of Pelvic Training

Contraction intensity: This is the extent that the pelvic muscles are squeezed, ranging from a weak flicker of the muscles to a robust and vigorous contraction. High intensity contractions build muscle strength, whereas less intensive, but more sustained contractions, build endurance.

Contraction Type: Pelvic contractions vary in duration. It is relatively easy to intensively contract the pelvic muscles for a brief period, but difficult to maintain that intensity for a longer duration contraction. Snaps are rapid, high intensity pulses that take less than one second per cycle of contracting and relaxing. Shorts are slower, less intense squeezes that can last anywhere from two to five seconds. Sustained are less intense squeezes that last ten seconds or longer.

Relaxation duration: The amount of time the pelvic muscles are unclenched between contractions.

Repetitions: The number of contractions performed in a single set.

Set: A unit of exercise.

Strength: The maximum amount of force that a pelvic muscle can exert.

Power: The ability to rapidly achieve a full intensity contraction, which is a measure of contraction strength and speed–in other words, how quickly strength can be expressed.  Power is fostered by rapidly and explosively contracting the pelvic muscles.

Endurance (stamina): This is the ability to sustain a pelvic contraction for a prolonged time and the ability to perform multiple contractions before fatigue sets in.

Range of motion: The cycle of full pelvic contraction (muscle shortening) to complete relaxation (muscle lengthening).  This is vital in pelvic muscle training because the goal is not only to increase strength, power and endurance, but also flexibility, which is accomplished by bringing the muscle through the full range of motion.

Bottom Line:  A one-size-fits-all Kegel pelvic floor exercise program does not suit all women with pelvic floor dysfunction. To obtain optimal results, pelvic training must be tailored to the specific dysfunction. The achievement of functional pelvic fitness is one of the key goals (“key-goals”… get it?) of Kegel exercises and of the Kegel Fix: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.  Finally, it is important to know that pelvic exercises are appropriate not only for women suffering with the aforementioned pelvic floor dysfunctions, but also for those who wish to maintain healthy pelvic functioning and prevent future problems.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in dire need of bridging.

For informative information on pelvic floor muscle training, please consult the following books by the author:

 MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

Cover

The Kegel Fix is written for educated and discerning women who care about health, well-being, fitness, nutrition and enjoy feeling confident, sexy and strong.  The book has separate chapters on each of the pelvic floor dysfunctions and provides a specific, targeted pelvic floor training regimen for each.