Archive for August, 2017

Urologic Injuries Among U.S. Soldiers Deployed To The Middle East

August 26, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   8/26/17

Urological trauma (Urotrauma) is not uncommon among members of the USA military deployed in the Middle East. From October 2001-August 2013, approximately 1500 male soldiers suffered genital and/or urinary injuries.  Most were external, involving the penis, scrotum, testicles and urethra. At least one-third of these external injuries were severe, with 150 men losing either one or both testicles. The increased survival following complex traumatic injuries, which in prior conflicts would have likely resulted in death, now often result in survival of men with severe injuries, including those of the urological system. These injuries significantly affected sexual, urinary and reproductive health.

Defense.gov_News_Photo_110109-A-6521C-047_-_U.S._Army_soldiers_Staff_Sgt._Chad_Kair_Sgt._1st_Class_Travis_Leonhardt_and_Sgt._1st_Class_Charles_Houston_coordinate_security_during_a_meeting_to.jpg

Attribution of image above: By English: Sgt. Sean P. Casey, U.S. Army (www.defense.gov) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Improvements in battlefield medicine have significantly increased survival rates among injured soldiers.  However, these improvements have resulted in unprecedented numbers of soldiers—who previously would have died—surviving with injuries.  When traumatic injuries to the urinary and genital tract occur, they often result in urinary and sexual dysfunction, fertility issues and severe psychological trauma.

During the 12-year period under review, there were 30,000 injuries to deployed soldiers. 5% of soldiers sustained one or more urological injuries.  The majority of the injured were junior enlisted and members of the US Army or US Marine Corps, under 30 years old.  Most urological injuries occurred during battle and were predominately caused by explosive devices causing penetrating injuries. The scrotum was most commonly injured, followed by the testicles, penis, and urethra.  Loss of the entire penis and/or one or both testicles occurred in about 150 men. The consequence of severe genital injury is often a shortened, disfigured, nonfunctional penis, even despite conventional reconstructive surgery. Commonly accompanying urological trauma are brain trauma, pelvic fracture, colon and rectal injury and lower extremity injuries resulting in amputation.

The current pattern of urological injury represents a shift from internal urological structures—including the kidney, ureter, and bladder—to external urological structures.  This is attributed to the use of body armor that protects the chest and abdomen, but not the external genitals.  Furthermore, the rugged terrain in Afghanistan exposes soldiers patrolling on foot to genital blast trauma from ground-based explosive devices. Traditionally, the protective clothing to minimize genital trauma from ground-based explosive high-energy projectiles devices is a lightweight boxer brief undergarment and a thicker brief-type outer garment that is worn over combat trousers.  The US Army has introduced a new “pelvic protector” designed to shield the soldier’s genital and perineal areas from debris generated by improvise explosive devices.

Bottom Line:  Male external genitals were the predominant structures injured in recent warfare. Severe testicular and/or penile injury occurred in a substantial portion of the soldiers, with urological injuries often accompanying general body trauma. Sadly, most injuries—many of which are disfiguring genital injuries—occur at the time of peak sexual and reproductive potential, negatively affecting relationships and paternity.  Fortunately, advances in injury prevention, organ reconstruction/replacement, penile transplantation, regenerative medicine and advanced sperm salvage have the potential of making a significant difference in the health and well-being of soldiers with significant genital/urinary trauma.

Resource for this entry: “Epidemiology Of Genitourinary Injuries Among Male United States Service Members Deployed To Iraq And Afghanistan: Early Findings From The Trauma Outcomes And Your General Health Project” J Janak, J Orman, D Soderdahl and S Hudak, Journal of Urology: Volume 197, pages 414 – 419, February 2017

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Healt

 

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Men’s Health: Holistic Urology Approach

August 19, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   8/19/17

pixabay

Thank you, Pixabay, for image above

Men Don’t Ask For Directions, Etc…

With respect to their health, women are usually adept at preventive care and commonly see an internist or gynecologist regularly.  On the other hand, men—who could certainly take a lesson from the fairer sex—are generally not good at seeing doctors for routine checkups. Not only has our culture indoctrinated in men the philosophy of “playing through pain,” but also the lack of necessity of seeking medical care when not having a specific problem or pain (and even when men do develop dangerous health warning signs, many choose to ignore them.). Consequently, many men have missed out on some vital opportunities: To be screened for risks that can lead to future medical issues; be diagnosed with problems that cause no symptoms (such as high blood pressure, glaucoma and prostate cancer); and counseled regarding means of modifying risk factors and optimizing health.

Many Men Don’t Have A Doc

Urologists evaluate and treat a large roster of male patients, a surprising number of whom have not sought healthcare elsewhere and do not have a primary physician. Urological visits offer an opportunity to not only focus on the specific urological complaint that drives the visit (usually urinary or sexual problems), but also to take a more encompassing holistic health approach, emphasizing modifications in diet, physical activity, and other lifestyle factors that can prevent many untoward consequences and maximize health. By getting men engaged in the healthcare system on a timely basis, they can be helped to minimize those risk factors that typically cause the illnesses that afflict men as they age.

Identifying and modifying risk factors can mitigate, if not prevent, a number of common maladies.  Modifiable risk factors for the primary killer of men—cardiovascular disease—include poor diet, obesity, physical inactivity, excessive alcohol, tobacco consumption, stress, high blood pressure, high blood glucose and diabetes, high cholesterol, obstructive sleep apnea, low testosterone and depression. The bottom line is that every patient contact provides an opportunity for so much more than merely treating the sexual or urinary complaint that brought the patient into the office. Furthermore, many systemic disease processes—including diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, cardiovascular diseases, etc.—have urological manifestations and symptoms that can be identified by the urologist who in turn can make a referral to the appropriate health care provider.

Erections are an Indicator of Health

Many men may not cherish seeing doctors on a routine basis, but a tipping point occurs when it comes to their penises not functioning!  Erectile dysfunction (ED) is a common reason for men to “bite the bullet” and call their friendly urologist for a consultation. The holistic approach by the consultant urologist is to not only manage the ED, but to diagnose the underlying risk factors that can be a sign of broader health issues than simply poor quality erections. Importantly, ED can be a warning sign of an underlying medical problem, since the quality of erections serves as a barometer of cardiovascular health.

    “A man with ED and no known cardiovascular disease                                                                      is a cardiac patient until proven otherwise.”

Graham Jackson, M.D., cardiologist from the U.K.

Since the penile arteries are small in diameter and the coronary (heart) arteries larger, it stands to reason that if vascular disease—generally a systemic process that is diffuse and not localized—is affecting the tiny penile arteries, it may affect the larger coronary arteries as well, if not now, then at some time in the future. In other words, the fatty deposits that compromise blood flow to the smaller vessels of the penis may also do so to the larger vessels of the heart and thus ED may be considered a “stress test.” In fact, the presence of ED is as much of a predictor of cardiovascular disease as is a strong family history of cardiac problems, tobacco smoking, or elevated cholesterol.

Dr. Jackson cleverly expanded the initials ED to mean: Endothelial dysfunction (endothelial cells line the insides of arteries); early detection (of heart disease); and early death (if missed). For this reason, men with ED should undergo a medical evaluation seeking arterial disease elsewhere in the body (heart, brain, aorta, and peripheral blood vessels).

Urologists have a broad network of colleagues (including internists, cardiologists, pulmonologists, gastroenterologists, medical oncologists, radiologists, radiation oncologists, general surgeons, etc.) that can be collaborated with and to whom patients can be referred to if and when their expertise is needed.

Urine is Golden

Of all the bodily secretions that humans produce, urine uniquely provides one of the best “tells” regarding health.  A simple and inexpensive urinary dipstick can diagnose diabetes, kidney disease, urinary tract infection, the presence of blood and hydration status, in a matter of moments.

What a dipstick can reveal:

specific gravity… hydration status

pH…acidity of urine

leukocytes…urinary infection

blood…many urological disorders including kidney and bladder cancer

nitrite…urinary infection

bilirubin…a yellow pigment found in bile, a substance made by the liver; its presence may be indicative of jaundice

protein…kidney disease

glucose…diabetes

Case report of a recent patient

54-year-old male with six-month history of frequent daytime urination as well as awakening 3-4 times during sleep hours to urinate. Additionally, he has difficulty maintaining erections and premature ejaculation. Physical examination of the abdomen, genitalia and prostate was unremarkable. Urinalysis showed large glucose. Lab studies showed glucose 204 (normally < 100); HbA1c 10.6% (normally < 5.6); testosterone 202 (normally > 300) and PSA 4.2 (elevated for his age). 

He was referred to an internist for management of diabetes that manifested with urinary frequency, elevated urine and blood glucose and elevated HbA1c (a measure of blood glucose levels over the past 6 weeks).  With appropriate management of the diabetes, the urinary frequency resolved. Because of the PSA elevation he is scheduled for an MRI of the prostate, and because of the low testosterone, he is undergoing additional endocrine testing to see if the problem is testicular or pituitary in origin and certainly will be a candidate for medical therapy if improved lifestyle measures fail to sufficiently elevate the testosterone.

Bottom Line: Preventive and proactive care—as many pursue regularly for their prized automobiles (e.g., lubrication and oil changes, replacing worn belts before they snap while on the road, etc.)—provides numerous advantages.  The same strategy should be applied to the human machine!  Since contact with a urologist may be a man’s only connection with the healthcare system, a vital opportunity exists for the urologist to offer holistic care in addition to specialty genital and urinary care.  The goal is to empower men by getting them invested in their own health in order to minimize disease risk and optimize vitality. 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

 

Diabetes And Urological Health

August 12, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  8/12/17

Your taste buds may crave sugar (glucose), but the rest of your body sure doesn’t!

A common presenting symptom of undiagnosed diabetes is frequent urination because of the urine-producing effect of glucose in the urine. People with such urinary frequency will often consult a urologist (urinary tract specialist) erroneously, thinking that the problem is kidney, bladder or prostate in origin, when in actuality it is the sugar in the urine that is the source of the problem.

Because of this urinary frequency presentation of diabetes, urologists often have the opportunity to make the initial diagnosis and refer the patient for appropriate care. Similarly, many uncircumcised men who have foreskin problems–particularly when the foreskin becomes stuck down over the head of the penis and will not retract (phimosis)–have undiagnosed diabetes. A simple dipstick of urine in conjunction with the typical presenting symptoms of frequent daytime and nighttime urination and/or foreskin issues directs the proper diagnosis.

Diabetes has detrimental effects on all body systems, with the urinary and genital systems no exception. Today’s entry reviews the impact of diabetes on urological health. Many urological problems occur as a result of diabetes, including urinary infections, kidney and bladder conditions, foreskin issues and sexual problems.  Additionally, diabetes increases the risk of kidney stones. Although many of the same urinary issues that are present in diabetics commonly also occur with the aging process (in the absence of diabetes), the presence of diabetes hastens their onset and severity.  Diabetes can have catastrophic consequences including the following: heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney failure requiring dialysis and vascular disease resulting in amputations.

Wickipedia public domain copy

Thank you, Wikipedia, for the above public domain image

Diabetes 101

Diabetes is a disease in which blood glucose levels are elevated. Glucose is the body’s main fuel source, derived from the diet.  Insulin, a hormone secreted by the pancreas, is responsible for moving glucose from the blood into the body’s cells so that life processes can be fueled. In diabetes, either there is no insulin, or alternatively, plenty of insulin, but the body cannot use it properly. Without functioning insulin, the glucose stays in the blood and not the cells that need it, resulting in potential harm to many organs.

Two distinct types of diabetes exist. Type 1 is an autoimmune condition in which the body’s immune system destroys insulin-producing cells, severely limiting or completely stopping all insulin production.  It is often inherited and is responsible for about 5% of diabetes. It is managed by insulin injections or an insulin pump.

Type 2 diabetes is caused by overeating and sedentary living and is responsible for 95% of diabetes. This form of diabetes is caused by insulin resistance, a condition in which the body cannot process insulin and is resistant to its actions. Anybody with excessive abdominal fat is on the pathway from insulin resistance towards diabetes.  Type 2 diabetes is a classic example of an avoidable and “elective” chronic disease that occurs because of an unhealthy lifestyle.

Sad, but true: Chances are that if you have a big abdomen (“visceral” obesity marked by internal fat) you are pre-diabetic. This leaves you with two pathways: the active pathway – cleaning up your diet, losing weight and getting serious about exercise, in which this potential problem can be nipped in the bud. However, if you take the passive pathway, you’ll likely end up with full-blown diabetes.

Common presenting symptoms of diabetes are frequent urination, thirst, extreme hunger, weight loss, fatigue and irritability, recurrent infections, blurry vision, cuts that are slow to heal, and tingling or numbness in the hands or feet.

Complications of diabetes occur because of chronic elevated blood glucose and consequent damage to blood vessels and nerves.  Diabetes accelerates atherosclerosis, a condition in which fatty deposits occur within the walls of arteries, compromising blood flow and the delivery of oxygen and nutrients to tissues. Diabetic “small blood vessel” disease can lead to retinopathy (visual problems leading to blindness), nephropathy (kidney damage leading to dialysis), and neuropathy (nerve damage causing loss of sensation).  Diabetic “large vessel disease” can cause coronary artery disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease.  Diabetes increases the risk of infections because of poor blood flow and impaired function of infection-fighting white blood cells.

Diabetes and the bladder

Many diabetics have urological problems on the basis of the neuropathy that affects the bladder.  These issues include impaired sensation in which the bladder becomes “numb” and the patient gets no signal to urinate as well as impaired bladder contractility in which the bladder muscle does not function properly, causing inability to empty the bladder completely.  Other diabetics develop involuntary bladder contractions (overactive bladder), causing urinary urgency, frequency and incontinence.

Diabetes and the kidneys

Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, accounting for almost half of all new cases. Even with diabetic control, the disease can lead to chronic kidney disease, kidney failure and the need for dialysis or kidney transplantation.

Diabetes and urinary/genital Infections

Diabetics have more frequent urinary tract infections than the general population because of factors including improper functioning of the infection-fighting white blood cells, glucose in the urine (a delightful treat for bacteria) and compromised blood flow. Diabetics have a greater risk of asymptomatic bacteriuria and pyuria (the presence of white cells and bacteria in the urine without infection), cystitis (bladder infections), and pyelonephritis (kidney infections).  Impaired bladder emptying further complicates the potential for infections.  Diabetics have more serious complications of pyelonephritis including kidney abscess, emphysematous pyelonephritis (infection with gas-forming bacteria), and urosepsis (a very serious systemic infection originating in the urinary tract requiring hospitalization and intravenous antibiotics).  Fournier’s gangrene (necrotizing fasciitis) is a soft tissue infection of the male genitals that often requires emergency surgery (that can be disfiguring) and has a very high mortality rate.  Over 90% of patients with Fournier’s gangrene are diabetic. Diabetic patients also have an increased prevalence of infections with surgical procedures, particularly those involving prosthetic implants, including penile implants, artificial urinary sphincters, and mesh implants for pelvic organ prolapse.

Diabetes and the foreskin

Balanoposthitis is medical speak for inflammation of the head of the penis and foreskin. As mentioned previously, a tight foreskin that cannot be pulled back to expose the head of the penis (phimosis) can be the first clinical sign of diabetes in uncircumcised men. At least 25% of men with this problem have underlying diabetes.  It is common for these men to have fungal infections under the foreskin because of the risk factors of a warm, moist, dark environment in conjunction with the presence of glucose in the urine. The good news is that phimosis and fungal infections often respond nicely to diabetic control.

Who Knew? I learned from a patient of mine that this issue is referred to in slang as “sugar dick.”

Diabetes and sexual function

Sexual functioning is based upon good blood flow and an intact nerve supply to the genitals and pelvis.  Diabetics often develop sexual problems (in fact, diabetes is the most common cause of erectile dysfunction) because of the combination of neuropathy and blood vessel disease.  Men commonly have a reduced sex drive and have difficulty achieving and maintaining erections.  Diabetes increases the risk of erectile dysfunction threefold.  Diabetes has clearly been linked with testosterone deficiency, which can negatively impact sex drive and sexual function.  Because of the neuropathy, many diabetic males have retrograde ejaculation, a situation in which semen goes backwards into the bladder and not out the urethra.  Female diabetics are not spared from sexual problems and commonly have reduced desire, decreased arousal and sexual response, vaginal lubrication issues and painful sexual intercourse.

Diabetic management

With Type 2 diabetes it is vital to modify lifestyle, including dietary changes that avoid diabetic-promoting foods and replacement with healthier foods in order to have appropriate sugar control to help prevent diabetic complications. Diabetics should refrain from high glycemic index foods (those that are rapidly absorbed) including sugars and refined white carbohydrates and instead should consume high-fiber vegetables, fresh fruits, and whole-grain products.  Regular exercise is equally as important as healthy eating, and the combination of healthy eating, physical activity, and weight loss can often adequately address Type 2 diabetes.

When lifestyle measures cannot be successfully implemented or do not achieve complete resolution, there are different classes of medications that can be used to manage the diabetes. However, lifestyle modification should always be the initial approach, since lifestyle (in large part) caused the problem and is capable of improving/reversing it.  At times, when diet, exercise and drugs are unable to control the diabetes, bariatric (weight loss) surgery may be needed to control and even potentially eliminate the diabetes.

Bottom Line:  Diabetes is a serious chronic illness with potentially devastating complications. Type 1 diabetes is relatively rare and unavoidable, but is manageable with insulin replacement. Type 2 diabetes is epidemic and its prevalence has increased dramatically coincident with the expanding American waistline. It can be improved/reversed through integration of healthy eating habits, weight management, and exercise. Lifestyle modifications can be amazingly restorative to general, urological and sexual health and overall wellbeing. After all, our greatest wealth is health.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

Amazon page for Dr. Siegel’s books

 

 

Urology 101:  Much More Than “Pecker Checking”!

August 5, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  8/5/17

CME2P

I am a second-generation urologist. It is unlikely that there will be a third-generation urologist as my oldest child is a film-maker, my middle child works in tech marketing and my youngest is off to college later this month, intent on becoming a child psychologist. After she spent a day in the office with me, she told me that the experience caused her to have post-traumatic stress disorder!

As a youngster, I attended summer camp in New Hampshire at Camp Moosilauke . My friends made fun of my father’s profession, referring to him as a “pecker checker.”  Today’s entry is a brief review of what urology really is and what urologists do for a living. One thing is for sure…sooner or later most everyone will need the service of a urologist. 

“Urology” (uro—urinary tract and logos—study of) is the branch of medicine that deals with the diagnosis and treatment of diseases of the urinary tract in males and females and of the reproductive tract in males. The urinary organs under the “domain” of urology include the kidneys, the ureters (tubes connecting the kidneys to the urinary bladder), the urinary bladder, and the urethra (channel that conducts urine from the bladder to the outside).  These body parts are responsible for the production, storage and release of urine.

The male reproductive organs under the “domain” of urology include the testes, epididymis (structures above and behind the testicle where sperm mature and are stored), vas deferens (sperm duct), seminal vesicles (structures that produce the bulk of semen), prostate gland and, of course, the scrotum and penis.  These body parts are responsible for the production, storage and release of reproductive fluids.  The reproductive and urinary tracts are closely connected, and disorders of one oftentimes affect the other…thus urologists are referred to as “genitourinary” specialists.

Urology is a balanced specialty– urologists treat men and women, young and old, from pediatric to geriatric.  Whereas most physicians are either medical doctors or surgeons, a urologist is both, with time divided between a busy office practice and the operating room.  Although most urologists are men, more and more women than every before have been entering the urological workforce.

Factoid: My pathway to urology was 4 years of college, 4 years of medical school, 2 years of general surgery residency, 4 years of urology residency and 1 year of specialty fellowship in pelvic medicine and reconstructive urology.  I started practicing at age 33.

Factoid: Becoming board certified is the equivalent of a lawyer passing the bar exam. There are three possible board certifications in urology: general urology, pediatric urology, and female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Thereafter, one must maintain board certification by participating in continuing medical education and pass a recertification exam every ten years.  I am dually certified in general urology as well as female pelvic medicine.  The common problems I take care of in my female pelvic medicine practice are urinary incontinence (stress urinary incontinence and overactive bladder), pelvic organ prolapse and recurrent urinary tract infections

Urologists are the male counterparts to gynecologists and the go-to physicians when it comes to expertise in male pelvic health.  Urological surgery involves operating on patients with potentially life-threatening illnesses, particularly cancers of the genital and urinary tracts.  In terms of new cancer cases per year in American men, prostate cancer is number one accounting for almost 30% of cases; bladder cancer is number four accounting for 6% of cases; and cancer of the kidney and renal pelvis (the inner part of the kidney that collects the urine) is number six accounting for 5% of cases.  Urologists are also the specialists who treat testicular cancer.  Urologists also treat women with kidney and bladder cancer, although the prevalence of these cancers is much less in women than in males.

Urology has always been on the cutting edge of surgical advancements (no pun intended) and urologists use minimally invasive technologies including fiber-optic scopes to view the entire inside of the urinary tract, as well as ultrasound, lasers, laparoscopy and robotics.  There is overlap in what urologists do with other medical and surgical disciplines, including nephrology (doctors who specialize in medical diseases of the kidney); oncology (medical cancer specialists); radiation oncologists (radiation cancer specialists); radiology (imaging); gynecology (female specialists); and endocrinology (hormone specialists).

Common reasons for a referral to a urologist include: blood in the urine, whether it is visible or picked up on a urine test; an elevated or an accelerated PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen); prostate enlargement; irregularities of the prostate on digital rectal examination; and urinary difficulties ranging the gamut from urinary leakage to the inability to urinate (urinary retention).

Urologists manage a variety of other issues. Kidney stones, which can be extraordinarily painful, keep us very busy, especially during the hot summer months when dehydration is more common. Infections are a large part of our practice and can involve the bladder, kidneys, prostate, testicles and epididymis.  Sexual dysfunction is a very common condition that occupies much of the time of the urologist—under this category are problems with obtaining and maintaining an erection, problems of ejaculation, and testosterone issues. Urologists treat not only male infertility, but also create male infertility when it is desired by performing voluntary male sterilization (vasectomy).   Urologists are responsible for caring for scrotal issues including testicular pain and swelling. Many referrals are made to urologists for blood in the semen.

 

RUPNOK

 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

Amazon page for Dr. Siegel’s books