Archive for July, 2017

Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation (PTNS) For Overactive Bladder (OAB)

July 29, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   7/29/17

ptns-v2@2x

PTNS therapy is a non-drug, non-surgical option to treat OAB symptoms including urinary urgency, frequency and urgency incontinence. PTNS consists of 12 weekly sessions in the office, followed by a maintenance regimen. During each 30-minute session, a thin needle electrode is placed into the ankle region and is connected to an external electrical stimulator. Up to 80% of patients improve with minimal, if any, side-effects.

OAB

Overactive bladder is a common and annoying condition present in both females and males marked by episodes of urinary urgency, frequency and, at times, incontinence. A variety of methods can be used to improve symptoms and quality of life, including the following: behavioral modifications, bladder retraining, pelvic floor muscle training, bladder relaxant medications and Botox injections.  Although medications are commonly used for OAB, the problem is that side effects and expense often limit their continued usage.

Neuromodulation

An effective alternative is neuromodulation, the least invasive technique of which is known as PTNS.  PTNS uses a thin, acupuncture-style needle placed in the ankle that is attached to a hand-held device that generates electrical stimulation.  This is a significantly less invasive means of neuromodulation than is Interstim, which requires implantable wire electrodes to be placed in the spine and continuous electrical stimulation with an implantable battery-powered pulse generator. In both instances, the sacral plexus—responsible for regulating bladder and pelvic floor function—is “modulated” by the electrical stimulation, causing a beneficial effect with improvement of OAB symptoms. With PTNS, the electrical stimulation travels up the tibial nerve to the sacral plexus, whereas with Interstim, the sacral plexus is directly stimulated by electrodes.

Nuts and Bolts of PTNS

PTNS involves once weekly visits to the office for 12 weeks, 30 minutes per session.  It can be performed on both female and male patients.

At each session, the patient is seated comfortably with the treatment leg elevated and supported.  A fine caliber needle electrode—similar to an acupuncture needle—is inserted into the inner ankle in the vicinity of the tibial nerve.  A grounding surface electrode is placed as well.  An adjustable electrical pulse is applied to the needle electrode via an external pulse generator. Activation of the tibial nerve is confirmed with a sensory (mild sensation in ankle or sole) and/or a motor (toe flex/fan or foot extension) response. Thereafter, the power of electrical stimulation is adjusted to an appropriate level and the 30-minute session begins. The patient can read, listen to music, nap, meditate, etc.

Clinical Response

Improvement in OAB symptoms often occurs by session 6, sometimes sooner. Patients who respond well to the 12-week protocol may require occasional maintenance treatments.  70-80% of patients will achieve long-term improvement in OAB symptoms. PTNS incurs minimal risks with the most common side effects being mild pain and skin irritation where the needle electrode is placed.

Insurance

PTNS is covered by most insurances, including Medicare.  PTNS cannot be used in patients with pacemakers or implantable defibrillators, those prone to excessive bleeding, those with nerve damage or women who are pregnant or planning to get pregnant during the treatment period.

YouTube on PTNS

“My PTNS” educational program

My nurse practitioner and I will be giving a seminar (free of charge) on PTNS on 7PM on Thursday, September 14, 2017 at the Marriott Hotel, 138 New Pehle Avenue, Saddle Brook, NJ.  Light refreshments will be served.  Space is limited, so if interested, please call 201-487-8866 to reserve a spot.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

Amazon page for Dr. Siegel’s books

 

 

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Maintaining Masculinity With Aging

July 21, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  7/21/17

“Time has a nasty way with human materials.”…Zadie Smith

“The reality of our bodies is that they are born and grow and in time suffer and decline.”  …Senator Ben Sasse

Bona Lane

No matter how old, most men wish to be able to travel down this road until their final breath.

Although the term masculinity may be better understood conceptually than described in words, it can be defined as possessing positive qualities traditionally associated with men: virility, drive, strength, vigor, resiliency, confidence, self-sufficiency, etc. Carried to an extreme, it can sometimes be associated with alpha behaviors including aggression, hyper-sexuality and supreme authority. Certainly, masculinity implies a certain “swagger” that clearly is unique from femininity. Sadly, aging and natural deterioration gradually rob men of many masculine attributes with the ultimate result–at some point in time–infirmity and frailty.

The Inevitable Loss of Horsepower

Our bodies-as-machines slowly lose their maximal horsepower and morph into less performative and functional machines.  The realities and challenges that accompany reaching senior years–the anatomical and functional deterioration that affect every organ system–are a direct blow to masculinity. A central premise of masculinity is having a strong and fit body; however, aging is at direct odds with masculinity because of the loss of bone and muscle mass, slower healing, accumulation of injuries and the occurrence of disease processes, resulting in declining strength and fitness.

All systems go to ground, as eventually we do. The senses–vision, hearing, taste, smell, touch–slowly rust away. Locomotion, nervous system, urinary system, bowel system, cognition and memory deteriorate. There is a good reason that athletes are considered “old” in their thirties. Rigidity of erections, the literal totem of masculinity, declines in proportion to age in years.

The silver lining is that although the degenerative process is inevitable and there will come a time when frailty will ensue, with the combination of strength training, cardiovascular conditioning, core and balance work, this process can be deferred substantially. Thinned bones, wasted muscles and hunched posture can be largely prevented by proactive and preemptive strikes against their onset.

I have an amazingly fit and cognitively intact 95-year-old patient who goes to the gym three times a week.  He lamented to me that because of an injury he was unable to work out for a few weeks and as a result he felt flabby and listless.

Retirement: Death with Benefits

At some point in the aging process, retirement from work becomes a reality for the vast majority of men.  Leaving work is one of the more challenging aspects of aging as our careers can often be considered “masculine” experiences from a primal perspective, since our roles as “hunter”—“warrior”—“gatherer” provide for our families.  Aside from financial resources, works provides benefits on so many levels—engendering a sense of usefulness and purpose, identity, dignity, self-worth, achievement, recognition, respect, (particularly self-respect), status and influence.  Furthermore, work also provides connection, collaboration and networking that are central to the human experience.  There is something special about having purpose and being productive, both of which give real meaning to one’s existence and help maintain vitality. This does not necessarily involve continuing to work full-time and compromising our fun and leisure activities, but rather achieving a healthy balance between work and play with part-time work, an encore career, volunteering, etc.

As a urologist with many years of clinical experience, I can attest to the fact that one of the shared attributes of my older patients who have aged well (Youthful Elderly Persons, a.k.a. Yeppies) is that they have NOT retired, often working well into their eighties and beyond.

Mitigate Risks

Typically associated with “masculinity” is risk-taking behavior.  Men are more likely than women to engage in activities such as smoking, heavy drinking, fast driving without seat belts, participating in sports with high injury rates, etc.  However, as we age, continued participation in such activities will not help the masculine cause, so at some point those who wish to maintain their masculinity will need to curtail unhealthy lifestyle activities and tailor sport participation in such a way as to maximize benefits, but minimize risks, for example, playing doubles tennis instead of singles.

Masculine to be Feminine

Masculinity often entails “alpha” behavior, which typically implies stoicism and self-reliance, in contrast to the female gender that is generally more emotive, communicative and willing to seek help from others. This translates to less preventive health care as men tend to be more reactive than proactive.  Furthermore, it generally leads to men having less meaningful and more superficial relationships than our female counterparts. This cool and independent alpha manner does not foster the skillset necessary to deal with many of the unpleasant circumstances that often accompany aging. It behooves men to seek preventive health care as well as nourish internal health by developing deeper and more meaningful relationships with our significant other, children, family and friends. We are a species who exists to coexist and connect and it is this social web that provides a safety net for us, valuable always, but particularly so when isolation, depression, fear, anxiety, etc., strike.

Bottom LineThe aging process gradually and insidiously erodes “masculinity.” Continuing to work in some capacity, working out regularity, working towards minimizing high-risk activities and maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and working “inwards”—fighting the culturally-based stoicism and self-reliance that runs counter to humans as highly social creatures–in concert can preserve “masculine capital” to an advanced age.  Although aging can be considered the “enemy” and will ultimately prevail, it is all about the possibilities as opposed to the limitations of the process.

Thank you to Rick Siegel–my brother–for suggesting an entry on this topic, based upon reading a Wall Street Journal article from 2/27/17: “Need To Redefine Masculinity As We Get Older” by Dana Wechsler Linden.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health

Co-creator of the PelvicRx male pelvic floor muscle training DVD.

 

 

 

Sex And The Female Pelvic Floor Muscles

July 15, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD   7/15/17

The vagina and clitoris are the stars of the show, but the pelvic floor muscles are the behind-the-scenes “powerhouse” of these structures. The relationship between the pelvic muscles and the female sexual organs is similar to that between the diaphragm muscle and the lungs, the lungs as dependent upon the diaphragm for their proper functioning as the vagina and clitoris are on the pelvic muscles for their proper functioning.  The bottom line is that keeping the pelvic muscles fit and vital will not only optimize sexual function and pleasure, but will also benefit urinary, bowel and pelvic support issues as well as help prevent their onset. 15606-illustrated-silhouette-of-a-beautiful-woman-or

Image above, public domain

Size Matters

While penis size is a matter of concern to many, why is vaginal size so much less of an issue?  The reason is that penises are external and visible and vaginas internal and hidden. The average erect penis is 6 inches in length and the average vagina 4 inches in depth, implying that the average man is more than ample for the average woman. The width of the average erect penis is 1.5 inches and the width of the average vaginal opening is virtually zero inches since the vagina is a potential space with the walls touching each other at rest. However, the vagina is a highly accommodative organ that can stretch, expand and adapt to the extent that 10 pound babies can be delivered vaginally (ouch!).

More important than size is the strength and tone of the vaginal and pelvic floor muscles. Possessing well-developed and fit vaginal and pelvic floor muscles is an asset in the bedroom, not only capable of maximizing your own pleasure, but also effective in optimally gripping and “milking” a penis to climax.  Additionally, when partner erectile dysfunction issues exist, strong pelvic floor muscles can help compensate as they can resurrect (great word!) a penis that is becoming flaccid back to full rigidity.

Female Sexuality

Sex is a basic human need and a powerful means of connecting and bonding, central to the intimacy of interpersonal relationships, contributing to wellbeing and quality of life. Healthy sexual functioning is a vital part of general, physical, mental, social and emotional health.

Female sexuality is a complex and dynamic process involving the interplay of anatomical, physiological, hormonal, psychological, emotional and cultural factors that impact desire, arousal, lubrication and climax. Although desire is biologically driven based upon internal hormonal environment, many psychological and emotional factors play into it as well. Arousal requires erotic and/or physical stimulation that results in increased pelvic blood flow, which causes genital engorgement, vaginal lubrication and vaginal anatomical changes that allow the vagina to accommodate an erect penis. The ability to climax depends on the occurrence of a sequence of physiological and emotional responses, culminating in involuntary rhythmic contractions of the pelvic floor muscles.

Sexual research conducted by Masters and Johnson demonstrated that the primary reaction to sexual stimulation is vaso-congestion (increased blood flow) and the secondary reaction is increased muscle tension.  Orgasm is the release from the state of vaso-congestion and muscle tension.

Pelvic Muscle Strength Matters

Strong and fit pelvic muscles optimize sexual function since they play a pivotal role in sexuality. These muscles are highly responsive to sexual stimulation, reacting by contracting and increasing blood flow to the pelvis, thus enhancing arousal.  They also contribute to sensation during intercourse and provide the ability to clench the vagina and firmly “grip” the penis. Upon clitoral stimulation, the pelvic muscles reflexively contract.  When the pelvic muscles are voluntarily engaged, pelvic blood flow and sexual response are further intensified.

The strength and durability of pelvic contractions are directly related to orgasmic potential since the pelvic muscles are the “motor” that drives sexual climax. During orgasm, the pelvic muscles contract involuntarily in a rhythmic fashion and provide the muscle power behind the physical aspect of an orgasm. Women capable of achieving “seismic” orgasms most often have very strong, toned, supple and flexible pelvic muscles. The take home message is that the pleasurable sensation that you perceive during sex is directly related to pelvic muscle function. Supple and pliable pelvic muscles with trampoline-like tone are capable of a “pulling up and in” action that puts bounce into your sex life…and that of your partner!

Factoid:  “Pompoir” is the Tamil, Indian term applied to extreme pelvic muscle control over the vagina. With both partners remaining still, the penis is stroked by rhythmic and rippling pulsations of the pelvic muscles. “Kabbazah” is a parallel South Asian term—translated as “holder”—used to describe a woman with such pelvic floor muscle proficiency.  

Pelvic Floor Dysfunction

As sexual function is optimized when the pelvic floor muscles are working properly, so sexual function can be compromised when the pelvic floor muscles are not working up to par (pelvic floor muscle “dysfunction”).  Weakened pelvic muscles can cause sexual dysfunction and vaginal laxity (looseness), undermining sensation for the female and her partner. On the other hand, overly-tensioned pelvic muscles can also compromise sexual function because sexual intercourse can be painful, if not impossible, when the pelvic muscles are too taut.

Vaginal childbirth is one of the key culprits in causing weakened and stretched pelvic muscles, leading to loss of vaginal tone, diminished sensation with sexual stimulation and impaired ability to tighten the vagina.

Pelvic organ prolapse—a form of pelvic floor dysfunction in which one or more of the pelvic organs fall into the vaginal space and at times beyond the vaginal opening—can reduce sexual gratification on a mechanical basis from vaginal laxity and uncomfortable or painful intercourse. The body image issues that result from vaginal laxity and pelvic prolapse are profound and may be the most important factors that diminish one’s sex life. As the pelvic floor loses strength and tone, there is often an accompanying loss of sexual confidence.

Urinary incontinence—a form of pelvic floor dysfunction in which there is urinary leakage with coughing, sneezing and physical activities (stress incontinence) or leakage associated with the strong urge to urinate (urgency incontinence or overactive bladder)—can also contribute to an unsatisfying sex life because of fears of leakage during intercourse, concerns about odor and not feeling clean, embarrassment about the need for pads, and a negative body image perception. This can adversely influence sex drive, arousal and ability to orgasm.

A healthy sexual response involves being “in the moment,” free of concerns and worries. Women with pelvic floor dysfunction are often distracted during sex, preoccupied with their lack of control over their problem as well as their perception of their vagina being “abnormal” and what consequences this might have on their partner’s sexual experience.

Pelvic Floor Training

Pelvic floor muscle training is the essence of “functional fitness,” a workout program that develops pelvic muscle strength, power and stamina. The goal is to improve and/or prevent specific pelvic functional impairments that may be sexual, urinary, bowel, or involve altered support of the pelvic organs.

Many women exercise regularly but often neglect these hidden–but vitally important muscles– that can be optimized to great benefit via the right exercise regimen.  The key is to find the proper program, and for this I refer you to your source for everything Kegel: The KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

 

Urethral Compression Devices To Manage Male Urinary Incontinence

July 8, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  7/8/17

Male urinary leakage can often be cured or significantly improved with behavioral treatments, pelvic exercises, medications, or surgery. However, there are times when incontinence cannot be satisfactorily addressed by these means. Furthermore, there are circumstances in which medications or surgery cannot be considerations and situations in which patients want only simple and basic management.

This entry reviews the following male urinary incontinence appliances: “Dribblestop,” “Regain,” “Acticuf,” and “Urostop.” They all have in common a pinching mechanism that is applied to the urethra, similar to squeezing your penis between thumb and forefinger to prevent urinary leakage. The goal of using these devices is to stop the urinary leakage while keeping the blood circulation to the penis intact and maintaining a comfortable fit. This can be accomplished because only a minimum amount of pressure on the urethra is required to stop the unwanted flow of urine.

Dribblestop is a foam-padded, lightweight plastic clamp for men with moderate to severe leakage. It works by applying compression pressure to the top and bottom of the penis to pinch the urethra closed.  The device is worn just behind the head of the penis. A set contains two clamps that are held together by adjustable links (of 3 varying lengths) to calibrate the urethral compression.  The compression can be further fine-tuned by choosing one of two notches on the clamps.

dribblestop

Dribblestop 

 

Regain is a flexible plastic compression device for men with mild to moderate leakage. It consists of upper and lower arms connected by hinges. A foam pad that compresses the urethra is present on the lower arm and an elastic Velcro strap is attached to the upper arm. The penis is placed through the central opening and the device is bent to envelop the penis. The elastic strap is wrapped around to hold the device in place and to apply light pressure to the underside of the penis.  It is available in 3 sizes: small (penile circumference < 2.5 inches), medium (2.5 – 4 inches), and large (> 4 inches).  A package contains 3 devices, each providing about one week’s usage.

regain

Regain

regain2

Regain deployed

 

Acticuf is a disposable pouch for mild-moderate urinary leakage. It is an absorbable pocket closed on the deep end that has a mouth that opens and closes to contain the penis and compress the urethra.  The pouch is held horizontally between thumb and forefinger and squeezed to open it. The penis is inserted in the pouch as deeply as possible and the Acticuf mouth snugs down on the penis.  It can be loosening up by squeezing and releasing the compression mechanism a few times. It should be repositioned every 3-4 hours or so and not worn while sleeping.  It should be removed and discarded when saturated. A set consists of 10 pouches.

acticuff

Urostop is used for preventing urinary leakage that occurs at the time of sexual activity, whether during foreplay, intercourse or climax.  It consists of an adjustable tension silicone loop that is cinched down to occlude the urethra.  It is placed at the base of the penis prior to sex. The ring is slid down until it is adjacent to the ends of the loop and the erect penis is placed within the loop and the device is slid down to the penile base.  The end of the tubing without the ball is pulled to achieve the desired tension. The device should not be left on for more than 30 minutes. To remove the device, the end of the tubing with the ball is pulled.  Only water soluble lubricants should be use and it should be cleaned with soap and water after each use.  The device should be replaced after 6 months of use or sooner if it shows signs of wear and tear.

Urostop

Urostop

These urethral compression devices and many more urology products for men and women can be purchased online or via telephone from The Urology Health Store.   Shipping to the continental USA is free with orders over $50 and 10% discount can be obtained with promo code: “Urology10”

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health 

Femicushion: Conservative Management Of Pelvic Organ Prolapse

July 1, 2017

Andrew Siegel MD  7/1/17

Medical trivia: Did you know that July 1 is the transitional day in which medical students become interns, interns become residents, residents become fellows, and residents and fellows become attending physicians? It is typically a day of mass confusion in the hospital. For this reason, it is always better to be treated in June than July!

Pelvic organ prolapse (POP) is a common female condition due to weakened pelvic anatomical support.  It results in one or more of the pelvic organs falling into the vaginal space, and at times, outside of the vaginal opening.  Several of my previous entries have covered the topic of POP and its treatment:

Introduction to POP

More about POP

A pessary is an internal device available in different sizes and shapes that is placed within the vagina to keep the fallen pelvic organ in its proper anatomical position. I reviewed pessaries in a previous blog entry: The basics of pessaries

Today’s entry is on Femicushion, a newly available soft cushion that functions as an external pessary, which offers the advantage of not needing to be positioned deeply within the vagina as is a standard pessary.  This device is ideal for women who cannot or do not want to have surgery for their POP and are not thrilled with the concept of wearing an internal pessary.

femicushion posicionado

The Femicushion is composed of washable, medical-grade silicon and is available in three sizes based upon the anatomy of the vaginal opening.

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After the POP is “reduced” (the prolapsed pelvic organ is pushed back into its normal anatomical position), the appropriately sized Femicushion is placed just within the vaginal opening. Its presence prevents the fallen pelvic organ from descending outside the vaginal opening.

IMG_1397

Once in place, it is maintained in proper position with a special pad with Velcro that is attached to adjustable undergarments (all washable):

Femicushion

The Femicushion is designed to be worn during the day and removed at night. It is washed upon removal, to be worn the following day.

The Femicushion causes less complications than an internal pessary, since it is external and is removed and cleaned on a daily basis, reducing the risk for vaginitis and bleeding. Furthermore, it eliminates forgetting to remember the presence of the internal pessary that can give rise to erosions and other serious medical issues.

Dr. Sophia Souto and colleagues performed a pilot study of the Femicushion concluding that it is an effective means of alleviating POP symptoms and improving the quality of life of women suffering with POP.  Dr. Souto was kind enough to send me all of the images used in today’s entry.  For an excellent reference on the topic, see the following article published by Dr. Souto et al: Femicushion: A new pessary generation – pilot study for safety and efficacy.  Pelviperineology 2016: 35: 44-47

The Femicushion device can be purchased online at the Urology Health Store: Use “Urology 10” code for 10% discount and free shipping.

http://www.UrologyHealthStore.com

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”:  www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Dr. Andrew Siegel is a practicing physician and urological surgeon board-certified in urology as well as in female pelvic medicine and reconstructive surgery.  Dr. Siegel serves as Assistant Clinical Professor of Surgery at the Rutgers-New Jersey Medical School and is a Castle Connolly Top Doctor New York Metro Area, Inside Jersey Top Doctor and Inside Jersey Top Doctor for Women’s Health. His mission is to “bridge the gap” between the public and the medical community that is in such dire need of bridging.

Author of MALE PELVIC FITNESS: Optimizing Sexual & Urinary Health http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Author of THE KEGEL FIX: Recharging Female Pelvic, Sexual and Urinary Health  http://www.TheKegelFix.com