Archive for November, 2014

Sleep Erections: What’s Up with Them?

November 27, 2014

11/29/14

Andrew Siegel, MD

** This is equally relevant for the ladies as well as the gentlemen! Women get sleep erections just as men do, although obviously not as dramatic. Don’t forget that the clitoris is the female counterpart to the penis and it is qualitatively the same, although smaller in stature.

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There are 3 reasons humans experience erections: psychogenic, reflex, and nocturnal (sleep). Psychogenic erections are caused by erotic thoughts or sensual stimulation through vision, hearing or smell. Reflex erections occur in response to touch—sensory nerve impulses travel from the genitals to the spinal cord centers and then from the spinal cord centers back to the genitals. Nocturnal erections have a unique mechanism controlled by the brainstem.

Erections of the male penis and female clitoris can and do happen in non-sexual circumstances, particularly during sleep. Sleep erections often occur during a phase of sleep known as rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. During a typical night of sleep, 4-5 episodes of REM sleep will occur, each lasting about 10-15 minutes, at which time both dreams and erections are prominent. Interestingly, the content of dreams at the time of sleep-related erections is rarely erotic in nature. Of note, female REM sleep related clitoral erections occur along with other signs of arousal including vaginal lubrication.

Sleep erections are most prominent during puberty and gradually lessen with aging. As we get older, episodes of sleep erections become come fewer, shorter, less intense and begin later in the sleep cycle.

There seems to be a relationship between quality of sleeping and dreaming and the presence of sleep erections. Those who have the best quality sleep and dreams seem to have the best quality sleep erections, followed by poor sleepers/good dreamers, followed by good sleepers/poor dreamers and followed by poor sleepers/poor dreamers.

 Q. Why do we get sleep erections?

 A. The purpose behind sleep related erections is theorized to be to improve the oxygenation of the smooth muscle of the erectile tissue of the penis and clitoris to help maintain normal erections.

In the non-erect state, the blood oxygenation in the erectile tissue is 20–40 mm, while in the erect state it is 90–100 mm. It is thought that the flaccid state with its low oxygenation favors collagen and connective tissue formation in the smooth muscle of the erectile chambers, resulting in scarring and the potential for problems in achieving erections.

The hormone testosterone and the ED medications Viagra, Levitra, Cialis and Stendra have been found to improve the frequency, magnitude, duration and rigidity of sleep erections.

Bottom line: Sleep erections, present in both sexes, are a mechanism for protecting the anatomy and function of the erectile tissues, another clever trick that nature has devised to help ensure reproduction.

 

 

Reference: van Driel MF: Sleep-Related Erections Throughout the Ages. J Sex Med 2014;11:1867-1875

Applied Kegels: Functional Pelvic Fitness

November 19, 2014

Andrew Siegel MD 11/19/14

I’ll be in Miami for a few days at the SMSNA (Sexual Medical Society of North America) meeting, so will upload this blog earlier than usual.

 FUNCTIONAL PELVIC FITNESS

It’s one thing to work out your muscles in order to make them stronger, better toned and more durable, but it’s another dimension when you can put that effort to practical use over the course of your day. Since the pelvic floor muscles are muscles of function rather than form, muscles for “go” rather than “show,” they can be put into service when applied to common real life situations.

Urinary and Bowel Urgency (for both sexes)

Chances are that at one time or another you have experienced a sudden and urgent desire to use the bathroom when none was nowhere in sight. This often occurs as a result of an involuntary bladder or bowel contraction, when the bladder or bowel squeezes without your permission, sometimes on the basis of triggers that induce a conditioned response (classic triggers are hand washing, placing a key in the door to your home, rising from sitting, exposure to running water, entering the shower, cold or rainy weather, getting closer and closer to the bathroom, etc.). By recognizing the occurrence of the involuntary contraction and by actively squeezing your pelvic floor muscles using a “rapid flex” technique—rapidly pulsing the pelvic muscles 3-5 times—the urgency can be relieved (and the leakage that can sometimes occur can often be prevented). This works equally as well for bowel urgency as it does for urinary urgency.

Going a step beyond inhibiting urgency after it occurs is preventing it from occurring before it occurs. In order to do so, it is important to recognize any triggers that may induce your urgency. Immediately prior to exposure to a trigger, rapid flexes of the pelvic floor muscles can thwart the involuntary contraction before it even arises.

 

Dribbling After Urinating (for men)

An “after-dribble” of urine is more annoying than serious and is often a sign of weakening pelvic floor muscles, for which strengthening exercises have proven an effective remedy. Squeezing the pelvic floor muscles is the body’s natural way of expelling the contents of the urinary channel. When contracted, the bulbocavernosus muscle—the body’s urethral “stripper”—compresses the deep portion of the urethra, pushing the urine out. The 1909 Gray’s Anatomy aptly labeled this muscle the “ejaculator urine.”

By actively squeezing your pelvic floor muscles immediately after urinating by using a “basic flex” technique—powerfully pulsing the pelvic floor muscles 3-5 times for 1-2 seconds per contraction—the last few drops of urine will be directed into the toilet and not your pants.

 

Stress Urinary Incontinence (for both sexes)

Stress incontinence is urinary leakage provoked by sudden increases in abdominal pressure, triggered by sneezing, coughing, bending, lifting, exercising, positional change, etc. It is a common condition in women, often resulting from the pelvic trauma of childbirth, weakening the pelvic muscles and connective tissues that support the urinary channel. Although less common in men, it can occur following radical prostatectomy for prostate cancer and sometimes after prostate surgery done for benign conditions.

In order to help control stress incontinence, you need to be attentive to the triggers that provoke it. By actively squeezing the pelvic floor muscles immediately prior to the trigger exposure, the incontinence can be improved or eliminated. For example, if standing up provokes the incontinence, do a brisk pelvic floor muscle contraction using a “long, hard flex”—contracting the pelvic floor muscles powerfully for 3-5 seconds when transitioning from sitting to standing. This long, hard flex is a means of bracing the pelvic floor muscles immediately prior to an activity that incites the problem and can be a highly effective means of managing the stress incontinence. When practiced diligently, it becomes an automatic behavior.

 

Premature Ejaculation

Weak pelvic floor muscles seem to play a role in hindering your ability to delay ejaculation. Pelvic floor muscle exercises are a promising treatment option for premature ejaculation, as they will increase the strength, tone, power, and endurance of the pelvic muscles, which can help short-circuit the premature ejaculation. Numerous scientific studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of pelvic floor muscle training in the management of premature ejaculation.

To apply your pelvic muscle facility to the real life situation you need to recognize the imminent ejaculation, slow the pace of intercourse, pause the pelvic thrusting and perform a “hold”—a pelvic floor muscle contraction lasting about 10 seconds or so, until the point that the ejaculatory urgency disappears. By actively deploying your pelvic floor muscles by using this sustained contraction of the pelvic floor muscles, the ejaculation can often be forestalled and intercourse resumed.

Bottom Line: Pelvic floor muscle training has numerous practical benefits, from the bedroom to the bathroom. Learn more about the specifics of these exercises—rapid flexes, basic flexes, long hard flexes and holds, through the Private Gym pelvic floor muscle training program, a comprehensive, interactive, follow-along exercise program that strengthens the muscles that support sexual and urinary health. (www.PrivateGym.com)

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

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A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Private Gym: http://www.PrivateGym.com – now available on Amazon

10 Myths About Kegel Exercises: What You Need to Know

November 14, 2014

Andrew Siegel, M.D.

 

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Myth: Kegels are just for the ladies.

Truth: Au contraire…men have essentially the same pelvic floor muscles as do women and can derive similar benefits to sexual, urinary, and bowel health.

 

Myth: The best way to do Kegels is to stop the flow of urine.

Truth: If you can stop your stream, it is indeed proof that you are contracting the proper set of muscles. However, this is just a means of feedback to reinforce that you are employing the right muscles, but the bathroom should not be your Kegel muscle gymnasium.

 

Myth: You should do Kegel exercises as often as possible.

Truth: Pelvic floor muscle exercises strengthen and tone the pelvic floor muscles and like other muscle-strengthening routines, should not be performed every day. Pelvic exercises should be done in accordance with an intelligently designed plan of progressively more difficult and challenging exercises that require rest periods in order for optimal muscle growth and response.

 

Myth: You can and should do Kegels anywhere (while stopped in your car at a red light, waiting in line at the check out, while watching television, etc.)

Truth: Exercises of the pelvic floor muscles, like any other form of exercise, demand gravitas, focus, and isolation of the muscle group at hand. Until you are able to master the exercise regimen, it is best that the exercises be performed in an appropriate venue, free of distraction, which allows single-minded focus and concentration. This is not to say that once you achieve mastery of the exercises and a fit pelvic floor that you cannot integrate the exercises into the activities of daily living.

 

Myth: Holding the pelvic floor muscles tight all the time is desirable.

Truth: Not a good idea…the pelvic floor muscles have natural tone to them and when you are not actively engaging and exercising them, they should be left to their own natural state. There exists a condition—tension myalgia of the pelvic floor muscles—in which there is spasticity, tightness and pain due to excessive tension of these muscles. Pelvic floor training in this circumstance must be done with caution in order to avoid aggravating the pain, but maximal muscle contraction can induce maximal muscle relaxation, a meditative state between muscle contractions.

 

Myth: Focusing on your core is enough to ensure pelvic floor muscle fitness.

Truth: The pelvic floor muscles do form the floor of the “core” group of muscles and get some workout whenever the core muscles are exercised. However, for maximum benefit, specific focus needs to be made on the pelvic floor muscles. In Pilates and yoga, there is an emphasis on the core group of muscles and a collateral benefit to the pelvic floor muscles, but this is not enough to achieve the full potential fitness of a regimen that focuses exclusively on the pelvic muscles.

 

Myth: Kegel exercises do not help.

Truth: Au contraire…pelvic floor muscles have proven to help a variety of pelvic maladies in each gender. In females, pelvic floor muscle training can help urinary and bowel incontinence, pelvic relaxation, and sexual dysfunction. In males, pelvic floor muscle training can help incontinence (stress incontinence that follows prostate surgery, overactive bladder, and post void dribbling), erectile dysfunction, premature ejaculation and other forms of ejaculatory dysfunction as well as help bowel incontinence and tension myalgia of the pelvic floor.

 

Myth: Kegels are only helpful after a problem surfaces.

Truth: No, no, no. As in any exercise regimen, the best option is to be proactive and not reactive in order to maintain muscle mass and strength in order to prevent problems from arising before they have an opportunity to do so. Pelvic floor muscle training done during pregnancy can help prevent pelvic issues from arising in females and pelvic muscle training in males can likewise help prevent the onset of a variety of sexual and urinary maladies. There is no better time than the present to start pelvic exercises to delay or prevent symptoms.

 

Myth: You can stop doing Kegels once your muscles strengthen.

Truth: No, “use it or lose it” applies here as it does in any muscle-training regimen. Muscles adapt positively to the stresses and resistances placed upon them and so they adapt negatively to a lack of stresses and resistances. “Disuse atrophy” is a possibility with all muscles, including the pelvic floor muscles.

 

Myth: It is easy to learn how to isolate and exercise the pelvic floor muscles.

Truth: No, not the case at all. Studies have shown that over 70% of women who think they are doing pelvic floor muscle exercises properly are actually contracting other muscles, typically the rectus, the gluteal muscles, and the adductor muscles of the thigh. One of the greatest challenges is that there have been no well-designed, easy-to-follow pelvic muscle training programs…UNTIL NOW! The Private Gym Company was established after recognizing that there was an unmet need for a means by which a pelvic floor muscle-training program could be made accessible and available in the home setting. This comprehensive, interactive, follow-along exercise program is available on DVD…PrivateGym.com.

 

Myth: Kegels can adversely affect your sex life.

Truth: Absolutely not… In both genders, pelvic floor muscle training has been found to improve sexual function. The pelvic floor muscles play a critical role in both female and male sexuality, supporting clitoral and penile erections as well as ejaculation in males and orgasm in both genders.

 

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

6922

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Private Gym: http://www.PrivateGym.com – now available on Amazon

30 Interesting Kegel Facts

November 8, 2014

Kegel Facts

Andrew Siegel MD (11/8/14)

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  • Arnold Kegel (1894-1981) was a gynecologist who taught at the University of Southern California School of Medicine. He was singularly responsible in the late 1940s for popularizing pelvic floor exercises in women in order to improve their sexual and urinary health, particularly after childbirth. His legacy is the pelvic floor exercises that bear his name, known as “Kegels.”
  • Arnold Kegel invented a resistance device called the perineometer that was placed in the vagina to measure the strength of pelvic floor muscle contractions.
  • Arnold Kegel did not invent pelvic floor exercises, but popularized them in women. Pelvic floor muscle exercises have actually been known for thousands of years, Hippocrates and Galen having described them in ancient Greece and Rome, respectively, where they were performed in the baths and gymnasiums.
  • Kegel exercises are often used in women for stress incontinence (leakage with exercise, sneezing, coughing, etc.) and pelvic relaxation (weakening of the support tissues of the vagina causing dropped bladder, dropped uterus, dropped rectum, etc.).
  • Arnold Kegel wrote four classic articles: The Non-surgical Treatment of Genital Relaxation; Progressive Resistance Exercise in the Functional Restoration of the Perineal Muscles; Sexual Functions of the Pubococcygeus Muscle; The Physiologic Treatment of Poor Tone and Function of the Genital Muscles and of Urinary Stress Incontinence.
  • Kegel wrote: “Muscles that have lost tone, texture and function can be restored to use by active exercise against progressive resistance since muscles increase in strength in direct proportion to the demands placed upon them.”
  • Kegel believed that at least thirty hours of exercise is necessary to obtain maximal development of the pelvic floor muscles.
  • Kegel believed that surgical procedures for female incontinence and pelvic relaxation are facilitated by pre-operative and post-operative pelvic floor muscle exercises.
  • Kegel believed that well-developed pelvic muscles in females are associated with few sexual complaints and that “sexual feeling in the vagina is closely related to muscle tone and can be improved through muscle education and resistive exercise.” Following restoration of pelvic floor muscle function in women with incontinence or pelvic relaxation, he noted many patients with “more sexual feeling.”
  • Kegel believed that impaired function of the genital muscles is rarely observed in tail-wagging animals, suggesting that with constant movement of the tail, the pelvic floor muscles are activated sufficiently to maintain tone or to restore function following injury.
  • The pelvic floor muscles form the floor of the all-important core group of muscles.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are involved in 3 “S” functions: support of the pelvic organs; sphincter control of the bladder and the bowel; and sexual
  • Men have virtually the same pelvic floor muscles as do women with one minor variation: in men the bulbocavernosus muscle is a single muscle vs. in women it has a left and right component as it splits around the vagina.
  • Men can derive similar benefits from Kegel exercises in terms of improving their sexual and urinary health as do women.
  • Kegel exercises can improve urinary control in men, ranging from stress urinary incontinence that follows prostate surgery, to overactive bladder, to post-void dribbling.
  • Kegel exercises can improve sexual function in men, enhancing erections and ejaculation.
  • If the pelvic floor muscles are weak and not contracting properly, incontinence and sexual dysfunction can result. If they are hyper-contractile, spastic and tense, they can cause tension myalgia of the pelvic floor muscles, a.k.a. a “headache in the pelvis,” which often negatively affects sexual, urinary and bowel function.
  • The pelvic floor muscles contract rhythmically at the time of climax in both sexes. These muscles are the motor of ejaculation, responsible for the forcible ejaculation of semen at sexual climax. Kegel exercises can optimize ejaculatory volume, force and intensity.
  • The pelvic floor muscles have an important role during erections, activating and engaging to help maintain penile rigidity and a skyward angling erection. They are responsible for the transformation from a tumescent (softly swollen) penis to a rigid (rock-hard) penis. They exert external pressure on the roots of the penis, elevating blood pressure within the penis so that it is well above systolic blood pressure, creating a “hypertensive” penis and bone-like rigidity.
  • The Kegel muscles are located in the perineum, the area between the vagina and anus in a woman and between the scrotum and anus in a man.
  • The Kegel muscles are not the thigh muscles (adductors), abdominal muscles (rectus), or buttock muscles (gluteals).
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you see the base of the penis retract inwards towards the pubic bone and the testicles rise up as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you can make your erect penis lift up as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • You know you are doing Kegel exercises properly when you can interrupt your urinary stream as you contract your Kegel muscles.
  • The 1909 Gray’s Anatomy referred to one of the male Kegel muscles as the erector penis and another as the ejaculator urine, emphasizing the important role these muscles play in erections, ejaculation, and the ability to push out urine.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are 70% slow-twitch fibers, meaning fatigue-resistant and capable of endurance to maintain constant muscle tone (e.g., sphincter function), and 30% fast-twitch fibers, capable of active contraction (e.g., for ejaculation).
  • Kegel exercises are safe and non-invasive and should be considered a first-line approach for a variety of pelvic issues, as fit muscles are critical to healthy pelvic functioning.
  • The pelvic floor muscles are hidden from view and are a far cry from the external glamour muscles of the body. However, they deserve serious respect because, although not muscles with “mirror appeal,” they are responsible for powerful and beneficial functions, particularly so when intensified by training. Although the PFM are not muscles of glamour, they are our muscles of “amour.”
  • The Kegel muscles—as with other muscles in the body—are subject to the forces of adaptation. Unused as intended, they can suffer from “disuse atrophy.” Used appropriately as designed by nature, they can remain in a healthy structural and functional state. When targeted exercise is applied to them, particularly against the forces of resistance, their structure and function, as that of any other skeletal muscle, can be enhanced. Kegel exercises are an important component of Pilates and yoga.
  • As Kegel popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises in females in the late 1940’s, so Siegel (rhymes with Kegel) popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises in males in 2014, with a review article in the Gold Journal of Urology entitled: Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Men: Practical Applications, a book entitled: Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health, and his work co-creating the Private Gym male pelvic floor exercise DVD and resistance program.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

6922

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Author of Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health: http://www.MalePelvicFitness.com

Private Gym: http://www.PrivateGym.com – now available on Amazon

Use Your X or Lose It

November 1, 2014

Andrew Siegel, MD

Use X or lose it…X can be anything–you fill in the blank–your muscles, your brain, your bones, your sexual function.

The cells and tissues of our bodies—including muscles, bones, brains, and every other organ—are endowed with a remarkable capacity for “plasticity,” the quality of being able to be shaped and molded in an adaptive response to the environment they are exposed to. What it comes down to is that our human body is an “adaptation machine.”   Our composition is “fluid” as opposed to “static,” and our tissues are constantly being remodeled, restructured and refashioned in adaptive responses that occur in accordance to the forces, stresses, resistances and demands placed upon them. This plasticity is an amazing phenomenon that can be tapped into by purposely challenging our tissues with the appropriate resistances to enable them to perform at extreme high levels of function.

Today’s blog is a discussion of use X or lose it in the context of male sexual function.

Hard Fact: If you go for too long without an erection, smooth muscle and other tissues within the penis may be damaged, resulting in a loss of penile length and girth and negatively affecting your ability to achieve an erection.

Your penis needs to be utilized the way nature intended, just like every other body component…and that means not just to direct your urinary stream with laser-like precision! Your penis is a marvel of engineering, uniquely capable of increasing its blood flow by a factor of 40-50 times over baseline, this surge of blood flow happening within seconds and accomplished by relaxation of the smooth muscle within your penile arteries and erectile tissues. When your penis is erect, not only is rigidity achieved, but the erection also serves to keep your penile muscles and tissues richly oxygenated, elastic and functioning well. The dramatic increase in penile blood flow that occurs with an erection enhances subsequent erectile performance via the release of nitric oxide, one of the important chemical mediators of erections.

In the absence of regular sexual activity, disuse atrophy (wasting away with a decline in anatomy and function) of your penile smooth muscle and erectile tissues can occur. In a vicious cycle, the poor blood flow resulting from lack of use produces a state of poor oxygen levels in the penile tissues, that, in turn, can induce scarring, which can further compound sexual dysfunction.

Scientific studies have found that sexual intercourse on a regular basis protects against ED and that the risk of ED is inversely related to the frequency of intercourse. Men reporting intercourse less than once weekly had a two fold higher incidence of ED as compared to men reporting intercourse once weekly.  (Am J Med 2008 July;121(7): 592-596).

Radical prostatectomy, the surgical removal of the prostate gland for treatment of prostate cancer, can cause penile shortening. The gap in the urethra (because of the removed prostate) is bridged by sewing the bladder neck to the urethral stump, with a consequent loss of length thought to be on the basis of a telescoping phenomenon. Erectile dysfunction associated with damage to the nerves that are responsible for erections further compounds the shortening by causing disuse atrophy and scarring. For this reason, getting back in the saddle as soon as possible after surgery will help “rehabilitate” the penis by preventing disuse atrophy.

A Few Words on Adaptation

Your muscles and other tissues are capable of hypertrophy (growth) or atrophy (shrinkage), depending upon the environment to which they are subject to. Exposure to a stimulating and active “environment” on a long-term basis can positively affect not only your external appearance, but also more importantly, your internal health. Conversely, exposure to a non-stimulating, sedentary environment on a long-term basis can negatively affect your external appearance and internal health.

Every cell, tissue and organ of your body is endowed with a remarkable capacity for “plasticity,” the quality of being able to be shaped and molded in an adaptive response to environmental changes. It deserves repeating that your body and its parts are “fluid” as opposed to “static” and are constantly being remodeled, restructured and refashioned in adaptive responses occurring in accordance to the forces, stresses, resistances and demands placed upon it.

Use It or Lose It

Our bodies demand physical activity in order to function optimally. For example, our bones require weight bearing and biomechanical stresses in order to stay well mineralized and in peak functional condition, as bone mineralization is stimulated by the stresses brought on by a variety of movements. The same holds true for every organ in our body—to maintain maximal functioning they need to be put into the service for which they were designed. As much as our bodies adapt positively to resistance, so they will adapt negatively to a lack of resistance. For example, after wearing a cast on one’s arm for 6 weeks, there is noticeable wasting of the arm muscles, nothing other than disuse atrophy. This phenomenon will occur to any body part not used in the manner for which it was designed.

Beyond Using It

The magic of plasticity and adaptability can be tapped into by challenging your body to adapt to resistances to enable it to perform at extreme levels of function. Exercise is about the adaptation—in neuromuscular, mechanical, and metabolic terms—to the specific demands that are placed on it. As your body is subjected to gradual and progressive “overload,” adaptation occurs and a “new normal” level of fitness is achieved.

Your pelvic floor muscles play an important role during erections, activating and engaging to help maintain penile rigidity and a skyward angling erection. There is good reason that the 1909 Gray’s Anatomy labeled one of the pelvic floor muscles the “erector penis.” Numerous studies have documented the benefits of male Kegel exercises in the management of ED.

Participating in a pelvic floor muscle training program can be a very useful tool to improve ED. It will sharpen your awareness of your pelvic floor muscles and enable you to isolate them and increase their strength, tone, and endurance. As your pelvic floor muscles become more robust, erections will improve accordingly. A comprehensive program such as the Private Gym includes a basic series of progressive male Kegel exercises without resistance followed by the use of resistance equipment to maximize pelvic floor muscle strengthening and performance. The pelvic muscles—like any other muscle in your body—will gradually and progressively adapt to the load placed upon them and will strengthen in accordance with the resistance.

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Elston Howard was a New York Yankee who invented the batting “donut,” a circular lead weight that slides onto baseball bats and is used by on-deck batters. This added weight during practice swings is useful for stretching, enhancing bat speed and strength training; additionally, it makes the bat feel very light once it comes time to step up to the plate and remove the weight. Howard employed the resistance principle to heighten power—use the weighted bat in practice and when it comes time to step up to the plate, you’re going to perform better.

 

batting donut on bat

 

This principle will work on your “bat,” too—utilize resistance training in practice and when it comes time to “step up to the plate,” you’re going to perform better. Resistance training turns conditioning into a weapon that is capable of producing “outstanding” erections, maximizing endurance, and  boosting one’s confidence.

Bottom line: You can lose it, maintain it, or optimize it by not using it, using it, or subjecting it to exercise and resistance training, respectively. You are bestowed with an amazing and magical capacity for plasticity and adaptation, which can be transformative when used to your advantage and benefit.

Wishing you the best of health,

2014-04-23 20:16:29

http://www.AndrewSiegelMD.com

A new blog is posted every week. To receive the blogs in the in box of your email go to the following link and click on “email subscription”: www.HealthDoc13.WordPress.com

Note: As Arnold Kegel popularized pelvic floor muscle exercises in females in the late 1940’s, so I am working towards the goal of popularizing pelvic floor muscle exercises in males. This year I published a review article in the Gold Journal of Urology entitled Pelvic Floor Muscle Training in Men: Practical Applications to disseminate the importance and applications of these exercises to my urology colleagues. I wrote Male Pelvic Fitness: Optimizing Sexual and Urinary Health, a book intended to educate the non-medical population. I, along with my partner David Mandell and our superb pelvic floor team, co-created the Private Gym male pelvic floor exercise DVD and resistance program.

For more info on the book: www.MalePelvicFitness.com

For more info on the Private Gym: www.PrivateGym.com